"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

Amazon SearchBox

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Social Care Workforce Not Ready To Deliver Dementia Care - MPs

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, here is an article of interest in MedicalNews Today

A report published revealed the social care workforce is unfit to deliver quality care for people with dementia.

'Prepared to Care' a report by the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Dementia found large variation in the dementia skills of the social care workforce. Barriers to delivering good care included low levels of training, ineffective regulation, lack of accreditation for trainers and a limited understanding of dementia by commissioners.

During a four month long inquiry, families told MPs how a lack of skills led to poor care for loved ones. Experts reported less than half of staff providing home care had any dementia training and many were given just 15 minutes to deliver good care. In other evidence, high quality care reinforced that the right skills make a huge difference to people's lives. The report recommends that workforce development plans outlined in the National Dementia Strategy for England be quickly implemented.

Jeremy Wright MP, Chair of All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia says,

'It is deeply disturbing that the UK is not equipped to deliver high quality dementia care. One in three people over 65 die with dementia. This report identifies significant barriers to good care but it also presents unique opportunities to put things right. Organisations who deliver good care show us that ongoing training, support and the opportunity to practice person-centred care transform people's lives. We must improve training and support across the UK and give staff recognition for the difficult and important role they undertake.'

Neil Hunt, Chief Executive of Alzheimer's Society says,

'As the number of people with dementia reaches more than a million in less than 20 years, the entire social care workforce must be geared up to deliver good dementia care. Dementia care is a highly skilled profession. Social care staff must given the right support and training and the Department of Health must show leadership to deliver workforce development commitments in the National Dementia Strategy. Since the 1950's improvements in cancer care have given millions of people a better quality of life. The same must now be done for people with dementia.'

Elsewhere the report recommends that the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) could be used to develop career pathways for dementia care that could attract new staff and government funding for training. MPs also advocate that the Short Observational Framework tool (SOFI) could be used to inspect services for people with dementia and that an accreditation programme for trainers must be developed.

All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Dementia (APPG) raises awareness dementia amongst parliamentarians and aims to influence legislation and policy making to improve the lives of people with dementia and their carers.
Published in April 2008 the APPG on Dementia report, 'Always a last resort' found that up to.....read all of Workforce Not Ready To Deliver Dementia Care
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

3 comments:

BIO: Being Inward Outward said...

It is imperative that we don't lose trust in the those who are supposed to be responsible for the greater good...

LoveTohiDe said...

I've always feared that my elders will suffer from dementia. Reading about this here makes me fear for the worst.

Ramon said...

this is truly.. but I agree with BIO, as long as those responsible are addressing the concern, there is no need to be alarmed. This report calls for increased awareness and opens opportunities to make things right. On the other hand, authorities must be quick to respond and develop ways to improve training as well as raise support funds.

-------------

fluoxetineimprove symptoms of depression by increasing the availability of certain brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. It is believed that these brain chemicals can help improve emotions.