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Friday, October 31, 2014

November 1 is author's day

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals.Benevolant Society

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Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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famous authors

Thumbelina “, “The Ugly Duckling “, “The Little Mermaid “, “The Emperor’s New Clothes “, and “The Princess and the Pea all by Hans Christian Anderson

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll

The Last of the Mohicans and The Deerslayer.by James Fenimore Cooper

A Christmas Carol , Oliver Twist , Nicholas Nickleby, A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield and Great Expectations all by Charles Dickens<샄Ы> </샄ы>

Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Scarlet Letter or The House of the Seven Gables . By Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

The Call of the Wild and White Fang by Jack London

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Raven, Murders In The Rue Morgue, The Mask Of Red Death, The Fall Of The House Of Usher, The Black Cat, The Pit And The Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart. By Edgar Allan Poe<샄Ы> </샄ы>

Hamlet , Macbeth , Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , The Prince and the Pauper, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court , and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. by Mark Twain

Journey to the Centre of the Earth , From the Earth to the Moon , 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea , The Mysterious Island and Around the World in Eighty Days. By Jules Verne

The Invisible Man, The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau and The War of the Worlds. by H.G. Wells

The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest. By Oscar Wilde

Old Man and the Sea, For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway 




Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Famous people born in November activity

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Creating Together Journal

Do you know when these people were born in November?

Names
Susan Berg
Daniel Boone 
Burt Lancaster 
Roy Rogers 
Billy Graham 
Sally Field 
Katherine Hepburn 
Martin Luther 
Grace Kelly 

Dates
November 9, 1909
November 2, 1734
November 5, 1911
November 10, 1483
November 12, 1929
November 26, 1949
November 6, 1946
November 2, 1913
November 7, 1919



Answers: Daniel Boone: November 2, 1734, Burt Lancaster: November 2, 1913,  Roy Rogers: November 5, 1911, 
Billy Graham:  November 7, 1919,  Sally Field: November 6, 1946, Katherine Hepburn: November 9, 1909,  
9 Martin Luther: November 10, 1483, Grace Kelly: November 12, 1929, Susan Berg, November 26 1949.

When you do this activity, give hints such as higher or lower. Make it exciting!!

Monday, October 27, 2014

Halloween activities for everyone!

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



by Kathleen Milazzo, Chicago Recreation Examiner

Halloween is a wonderful excuse for a party and whether you are hosting one at a nursing home or having it at your own house, there are Halloween activities that everyone can participate in.

One of the most traditional Halloween activities is apple bobbing, however I even have trouble with that activity. The very young, the elderly, and the handicapped have even more difficulty and usually don't involve themselves in that game. For some it can feel as though they are being left out, but not to worry, we can fix that!

First, you need to know if you don't already that Alzheimer patients do not like water. Secondly, it's important with older individuals that you preserve their dignity, so you've got to present the activities to them carefully, especially when it's something that the young usually do. You may want to remind them that at their age they've earned the right to kick back and have some fun. You can also tell them that bobbing for apples in water is a kids game but that you've got a version that's a little more dignified for adults. Tell them they'll have fun and what do they care what anyone thinks. Finally start off by reminiscing and discussing with them how they celebrated at Halloween parties when they were young. Get them to laugh and remember if they can.

To further get them in the mood, costumes are in order. You only need to get some funny masks and/or hats. They can feel more a part of the party at little effort and cost.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Dementia and Halloween

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Eons

Dementia/Alzheimer’s and Halloween have something in common- they are both scary! To an dementia/Alzheimer’s person Halloween can be destabilizing because of children constantly ringing the doorbell, strange decorations, confusing costumes and ghostly creaking sounds which contribute to the spirit of the holiday. This doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate, but you might want to reevaluate the ritual to see it with Dementia/Alzheimer’s eyes.

Here are some tips for a fun Halloween:

•Prepare for the celebration by discussing your plans with the Alzheimer’s person and describing the holiday dynamics like trick or treaters. For example, show your loved one a decoration and ask, “Do you like this decoration?” If he or she says, “This frightens me,” then respect this perception. Don’t try to talk him or her out of it. Most patients will be okay with pumpkins and cats; however, witches and ghosts might be unnerving.

•Keep furniture in its place. Consequently, your loved one will not become confused or even worse, bump into things and fall. Dementia affects balance and perception. Watch out for low-lying candles! It’s always easier to prevent than to treat.

•Avoid rigging up strange sounds like ghostly laughter or creaking doors because they bombard people with too much stimuli.

•Let neighbors know that candy will be placed outside the door, (the honor system), so that children will not keep ringing the doorbell and frightening your loved one. Or put up a note on the door with instructions for trick or treaters. However, if your loved one is adequately prepared and looks forward to the children at your doorstep by all means let them come in and strut their stuff!

•Know your loved one’s dietary restrictions, especially if he or she is diabetic. If you keep Halloween candy in a nearby bowl, you might be surprised that much of it will be missing. Those candy corns can give anyone a sugar rush! Instead place some healthy, colorful treats like cut-up apples with cinnamon or berry/yogurt parfaits. Bake your own pumpkin pie using wholesome ingredients as you follow a lighter recipe.

Halloween can be tweaked and personalized to communicate a meaningful updated ritual. Both you and your loved one will enjoy the current anticipation as you tap into a positive memory of past celebrations. Make decorations together to maximize the occasion. Art therapy provides positive stimulation and creative self-expression. And while you are coloring and pasting, play music in the background, preferably from your loved one’s time period, for happiness synergy.

Did you ever think that Halloween can be scary for your parents with dementia??

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Thursday, October 23, 2014

National Cocoa Day is coming

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to  get an easyceu or two
 
Punchbowl

It’s National Cocoa Day! Nothing warms you up better on a cold winter day than a nice cup of hot cocoa! Cocoa (the dried, fully fermented seeds of the cacao tree) is the basis for cocoa powder, which is used to make the hot cocoa beverage we all know and love. Did you know that monkeys were the first creatures to discover that the cacao plant was edible and quite tasty? Over 1500 years ago, monkeys began to consume the pulp of the plant and spit out the beans. Humans soon began to follow the monkey's example and the rest is history.

Cacao trees are grown all over the world, but it is believed that the first cacao trees grew in South America. Cocoa is similar to wine in that its flavor differs depending on the location where it is grown. It's a good thing that cacao trees are plentiful because approximately 300 to 600 cocoa beans are needed to make just two pounds of chocolate!

To celebrate National Cocoa Day, make your favorite type of cocoa to enjoy. For a holiday twist on a traditional cup of cocoa, try adding a candy cane!


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

More on Hi Neighbor Month

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

What kind of relationship do you have with your neighbors? Many people today don’t even know their neighbors these days. Today show your neighbors how much they mean to you. Bake some cupcakes, brownies or frame a photo of you together and give it to them. You can give them a card to let them know they are an important part of your life. Maybe you can plan a neighborhood holiday get together. This is the time of year to celebrate your neighborhood.

 




Hi Neighbor"

“Hi Neighbor” was created to encourage people to come outside and talk with their neighbors, reconnect with those they haven’t seen in awhile and begin establishing relationships that build strong communities. Initially a one night event in June, the CRC now promotes the entire month of June as “Hi Neighbor” month. This is a great time to plan a party, do a good deed for a neighbor or just visit.

 

The History of Hi Neighbor

Do you know your neighbors? Have you taken any time recently to stop and chat with those that live near you? Many of us might answer no to both of these questions. Our busy lives and the construction of modern homes with the focus on backyard patios rather than front porches, have led to isolation among neighbors. Worthington has taken steps to change this through our annual “Hi Neighbor” night. Sponsored by the Community Relations Commission, “Hi Neighbor” began in 2001 and received international attention through media outlines throughout the United States, Canada and Britain.

The idea for this event grew from conversations that former City Council Member Courtney Chapman had with several Worthington residents. The September 11th tragedy has made many of us long for more connections with family, friends, and neighbors. Worthington City Council is supportive of this initiative to build neighborly relationships throughout the City, and asked the Community Relations Commission to organize this event. “Hi Neighbor” nights in Worthington
are meant to be informal opportunities for neighbors to get to know each other. Participants could bring along family photos of new grandchildren or recent vacations. . The possibilities are endless.
 



Sunday, October 19, 2014

December is Hi Neighbor Month

 
Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two
 
 
There are more words on this video even though it is with Barney


Here are words to the song Hi Neighbor


spoken
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Whadaya know
And whadaya say
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Throw all your worries away
Come on and shake my hand
And let a grin do the rest
It makes you feel so grand
To get your chin off your chest
And shout
"Hi, Neighbor!"
My Neighbor
Time to play
And say "Hi!"
Never, never, never wear a frown
Or let yourself get down
Just take a minute
And you'll all begin it
Hi, Hi, Neighbor!
(Instrumental interlude)
(spoken)
Well, Hiya, Neighbor!
Ah ... Howdy, Partner!
Whadaya know
And whadaya say
Hey!
(spoken)
Hi, Neighbor!
Why ... ah, Howdy, Partner!
Throw your worries
Away for a day
Come on and shake my hand
And let a grin do the rest
It makes you feel so grand
To get your chin off your chest
I'm shoutin' to ya
"Hi, Hi, Neighbor!"
My Neighbor
Time to play
And say "Hi, Neighbor!"
Hi, Neighbor!
Keep the chin up
Light the grin up
Follow right up with
"Hi!"