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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

What's My Thanksgiving Line?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter 


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition 
 

Here is a dementia Thanksgiving activity


A Game About Thanksgiving Food for Dementia Sufferers, Long-Term Care Residents



Thanksgiving is right around the corner and will be here before you know it.


This game is ideal for folks with Alzheimer's disease, related dementias, other long-term care residents, those attending adult daycare and people with these diseases living at home.


The group leader can be an activity staff member, other long-term care staff member, a volunteer or family member.


This game is easy to do, a lot of fun, can be adapted and modified for other occasions, and can be used with a wide variety of audiences.


The game is loosely based on the classic television show called, What's My Line. This program originally aired in the 1950s and 60s.


Instead of guessing the guests profession, the guest is pretending to be a Thanksgiving dish.


Before starting the activity, set the stage for the group or individual playing. Tell them that each person is going to pretend to be a food served at a Thanksgiving dinner.


It is probably best to discuss foods eaten on Thanksgiving first. If possible, give each participant a list of food eaten during Thanksgiving. The list can be given before the discussion or after depending on the group's cognitive level. Alternately, you could have a whiteboard or a blackboard and write down the foods as they are mentioned.


As the foods are talked about, it is probably a good idea to discuss the characteristics of the food to remind the group members about the foods. You could include this information on your list.


You will also want to have pictures of popular Thanksgiving foods. You could also write a food name on an index card to hand to the participant who is having trouble thinking of a food on his own. Have a number of cards, each with a food written on it. Also have some blank cards for those who have thought of a food on their own. Handing them the card with the food name on it is a good reminder of the food's name should they forget what they chose.


Remember, folks with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias have poor short term memory.


After the discussion, it is time to play the game. Tell the group or individual again that each person is going to have a turn "being" a Thanksgiving food

Choose a person in the group to be the first contestant. You could be the first player to show everyone how the game is played.

Give the player a card with a
food name written on it or have a short private conversation to decide what the food to be guessed will be

Tell all we are going to ask the contestant about the
food he is pretending to be

Here is a sample list of questions.

Alter it as needed

Is the
food a vegetable, meat, or dessert?

Is the
food served hot or cold?

What color is the food?

You may have to provide a choice of two colors

Is the
food hard or soft?

Is the
food sweet, sour, etc?

Do you
eat the food with a fork or spoon?

After each question is asked and answered, ask if someone wants to guess what the
food is.

Give each person in the group a turn to pretend to be a food.

During the activity, make sure you or the group leader is excited and animated. Make it sound like you are really on a
game show.

You could give out prizes or hugs to those who guess correctly.

This
game is a perfect lead into other discussions about Thanksgiving.

You can reminisce about past Thanksgivings. You can talk about why you are thankful for each person there, or what each participant is thankful for. Planning a Thanksgiving
dinner might also be fun. Also sharing favorite Thanksgiving recipes is sure to be enjoyable.

When you are finished, thank everyone for coming. Tell them how much you enjoyed being with them

Monday, September 15, 2014

Thanksgiving Activities for Those with Dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia


According to the National Institute of Mental Health(NIMH) over 5.4 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Countless others are impacted by their illness. Studies have shown that eating right staves off dementia and slows the decline of someone who already has Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia.


What can you do as a friend, loved one, or health care professional, to make Thanksgiving enjoyable and healthy.


The first thing is to keep it simple. Do not make elaborate dishes that take lots of time. There are plenty of easy healthy recipes out there. Using South Beach Diet, Zone Diet or Weight Watchers recipes is a good place to start. You can modify the recipes according to the dementia persons' likes and dislikes.


Another tip is to involve persons with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Ask them about their preferences. If they say that they do not know, help them by telling them about things you like. Say, for example, I like squash. How about you? Then talk about ways to make squash. In this way, you can discuss every item you want to have for Thanksgiving.
Have them help you prepare the food. Give dementia persons simple tasks to do. Of course, you need to know their strengths and weaknesses to choose an appropriate chore. Make sure the assignment is failure free. In other words, there is no right or wrong way to do it. While you are preparing the food, reminisce about past Thanksgivings. Do not ask: Do you remember when...? Rather say That was so much fun when we...


Have a good belly laugh while talking about the good old days. Remember, research indicates that laughter does make someone feel better.


Fill your home with pleasant soothing aromas. Making a soup before or after Thanksgiving is a good way to do this. Cook the soup on a low flame all day long to let those heavenly smells fill the air.


Do not have too many guests at the meal. Make sure to keep it low key.


You may want to have two Thanksgiving meals. One for you and one for them. The one for them need not be on Thanksgiving Day. Pick a day that you and the dementia person can spend the day together enjoying all the happiness has to offer.


Now that you have read about the tips for healthy dementia dining, go have a great day
The book Adorable Photographs of Our Baby makes a great holiday gift for someone with dementia


Saturday, September 13, 2014

Autumn craft: A simple centerpiece

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two






Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Autumn gardens are filled with the makings for bouquets and arrangements that can be placed outside or, when it turns cooler and the holidays approach, brought inside for a centerpiece. Try an arrangement with the following late-blooming flowers, vegetables, berries, fruits, and leaves:

Flowers
Sunflowers, asters, dahlias, zinnias, hydrangeas, September flower, sage, autumn bugbane

Vegetables and herbs
Pumpkins, winter squash, gourds, peppers, winter wheat, dill, sage

Berries and fruits
Cranberries, beautyberries, nandina, baneberries, porcelain berries, crabapples, blue cohosh berries, apples, pomegranates, mandarin oranges

Leaves
Colorful leaves from trees such as maple, oak, and magnolia; bushes such as viburnum and burning bush; or vines such as grape leaves and porcelain vine


Thursday, September 11, 2014

A Memory Pie - Creating a life experience for today which will create discussion for tomorrow.

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Spark of Life

Jenn French

Kristina Larsson & Pamela Morales share how residents and staff at Meath House, Trigg, discovered cooking had never been so much fun as when it included every resident in their dementia ward.

It all started outside - on a beautiful day - where the residents were enjoying picking apples off our apple tree. In a team effort, the tallest picked the apples off the highest branches and passed them to those waiting below. Then we all geared up in gloves and hairnets for pie making, and, of course, everyone looked absolutely fabulous! The atmosphere was one of a big family coming together. Can there be anything better than the smell of homemade apple pie, wafting throughout the home and the sound of laughter coming from the kitchen? It was absolutely wonderful to see the residents' pride in making that lovely, fresh apple pie. Everyone talked about it for days and many of us agreed that it was the best apple pie we'd ever tasted.

Transforming apple pie into memories

Now the residents are making their own collage with bake-up day photos, getting creative and reminiscing at the same time.

Everyone participates in the craft sessions, even if just by looking at the photos, or being encouraged to share ideas and thoughts.

Making their own collage, and then seeing it displayed, will ensure that this is one activity that will continue to prompt discussion. Whether young or old, seeing ourselves in a photo brings out the same question: "Is that really me?"

Laughter is truly the best medicine and don't we all love to have fun? We definitely do here at Meath and making that apple pie certainly put a smile on everyone's face.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

An awesome apple activity

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information you will find valuable

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Remember October is Apple Month


For lower functioning residents, talk about the color of apples. Maybe you could have some real apples for them to see touch and feel.

You could have other large items that are red, green or yellow(the color of apples) for the residents to talk about. You could also have some red material of different textures for the residents to feel. Many lower functioning residents like the feel of certain materials and like to rub big pieces of material.




Sunday, September 7, 2014

A creative activity for those with dementia


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazineAlzheimer's Activities Expert


Here is an activity was posted on the September issue of Activity Director Today a while back

Engaging in creative endeavors is vital for long term care residents. It is an important
way to keep them thinking. It keeps their minds working and raises self esteem.

One such activity that easily encourages creativity, I call, A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

This is an easy activity to do as long as you have the right picture for participants to describe and the right frame of mind to facilitate the discussion of the picture. As with any activity you need to adapt and modify it so that it is success oriented and failure free.

Use a picture that is colorful with large, easy to describe items, that interests your audience.

Baby photographs are one type of picture that seems to have universal appeal for nursing home residents especially those with dementia. an ideal book and flash cards Adorable Photographs of Our Babyhttp://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1424321859/ref=ord_cart_shr?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance

You act as the facilitator in some cases. Be ready to help the participants with discussion questions

Before you show the person(s) the picture, tell them you are going to help them write a
story about a picture because you know they are smart and have good ideas.

Now you are ready to show the picture(s) to the members of the group. As you ask the
questions, make sure you show the picture to the participant(s) that you are directing
the questions to. You or someone in the group can be the eyes for visually impaired
participants. However, you will see that the discussion may take on a life of its own
where the picture may not even be needed. Think of the picture as a story starter

You might begin with the question, “Do you like this picture?”

If the majority of the audience says, “No”, use a different one. It is important to have at
least two pictures available in case this happens.

Now that you have a picture most group members like, you want to ask a series of
questions about it.

As you ask the questions about the picture, note any remarkable responses. That is,
statements about the picture that will make the story interesting. Remember to assist
members of the audience with answers to questions by providing the help they may
need.

For example, if they are having trouble deciding what season is shown in the picture,
talk about the seasons of the year, by asking them to name the seasons. If they are
having trouble, give them a choice of two. If there is still some confusion, say that the
baby and the lady are wearing swimsuits. Ask about the season that swimsuits are
worn in etc.

Understand that you can ask any question that you want to, which will help facilitate the
discussion.


You may have to give two choices for an answer to a question if you do not get any
response from an open ended question. An example to the question, “How is he
feeling”, might be: “Is he happy or sad?” If you still don’t get a response, then say, “I
think he is happy because he is smiling. Do you agree (say the participant’s name)?”
Then you might extend the thought by asking about the baby’s face. There is a good
chance a participant may say that the baby is smiling. You could ask what kind of smile
he has etc... You can include these facts in the story when you write it.

Emphasize that there are really no right or wrong answers to any of the questions. Tell
them that it is just what they think the answer is. Again stress that you know how smart
and creative everyone is.

Thus this is a good creative outlet for long term care residents even if they have
limitations.

You may want to have the group members suggest an opening line to the story such
as: “Once upon a time”, “One sunny day”, “A few days ago” or whatever works.
After you have compiled all the answers to the questions, write a simple story about the
picture using all or some of the answers given.

Then, later on, show the picture and read the story perhaps noting some great remarks
of those that participated. Of course, be complimentary. You may want to post the story
or create a short story book. Sometimes I share ideas that were expressed in this
group to family members.


Adorable Photographs of Our Baby, flash cards, are ideal for this activityhttp://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1424321859/ref=ord_cart_shr?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance

As with any activity, a sure way to guarantee success is for you or the group leader to be
animated and excited about doing the activity. Praising the participants for their efforts is
key to a positive outcome as well


 

Friday, September 5, 2014

Alzheimer's training

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

At EasyCEU.com, we see the challenges caregivers face everywhere, and every day, in helping preserve quality of life for individuals with this diagnosis. That's why we're taking part in our local Alzheimer's Association's Walk to End Alzheimer's in just a few days. 
 
In honor of this, we're offering a great discount on our NAB approved Alzheimer's online CEU course!
 
Use promo code ALZCARE to get 15% off our NAB approved 
Alzheimer's online CEU course
 
Our NAB approved Alzheimer's online course is designed to review the pathophysiology and process of Alzheimer's disease, a brief overview of Alzheimer's disease research, and the impact of the disease on the patient and the family. Interventions to care for residents with Alzheimer's disease, and ways to help the family cope are discussed to help caregivers meet the challenge of caring for residents afflicted with this devastating disease. 
 
This fantastic program is available here:
 
If you take advantage of this discount, please consider donating to the Alzheimer's Association by clicking here.
 
Thank you,
 
Sharon K. Brothers, MSW
CEO
Institute for Professional Care Education
8740 SE Sunnybrook Blvd, Suite 300
Clackamas, OR  97015