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Thursday, March 5, 2015

How Daylight Savings Time Affects Those with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

First Light Home Care
How Daylight Savings Time Effects Your Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease
Posted by Gina Kaurich in Alzheimer's & Dementia Care, Caregiving, Health & Wellness
Daylight Savings Time starts Sunday March 8.

Read this for some insight as to how daylight savings time may affect your loved one or client with dementia
It occurred to me as I sat at breakfast with my mother in law, Martha, who suffers with Alzheimer’s disease that she didn’t seem quite herself today.  That may sound strange to some of you but even as an individual is progressing through the dementia stages they do retain certain parts of their personality.  Now, sometimes the subtle changes can occur before an illness such as a urinary tract infection or even dehydration.  So I started this morning with running through the gamut of potential problems.  Beginning with the small things such as the lighting being adequate, is she warm enough, does she have her hearing aids in place and are they turned up so she can hear me.  I then moved on to what I call the intermediate of potential issues, such as did she take her medications last night and today, did she seem stuffy or congested this morning, had she had a bowel movement yesterday, or did her unusually quiet behavior reflect something else.  She seemed tired and when she asked what time it was, it hit me; last night was the shift to Daylight Savings Time.
Now you would not expect this to create any problems for someone who is not cognitively aware of the time of day any longer; but just like a baby or child, the individual with Alzheimer’s has a sense something is different.  We did not necessarily get her up an hour earlier or make any changes to her routine but she sensed a change.  She asked repeatedly during the day what time it was and finally said she felt tired today.  There are times when she is such a “hoot”!  Her surprised reaction when we told her the time was, “Oh my, how could I have slept so long.”  And when we all laugh, she laughs and enjoys herself right along with the rest of us, it is wonderful.  I love to see her have those happy moments.
Meals were the epicenter of her confusion with Day Light Savings time; she just couldn’t believe it was time to eat again.  This made us all laugh again since Martha is a very tiny woman who weighs about 98 pounds but eats constantly.  Around our house we have candy dishes filled with her favorite “Hershey Kisses” along with bowls of unsalted pecans, almonds and fruit.  Needless to say, she does not go hungry.  However, today her eating pattern has shifted and instead of eating all of those treats between meals, she is eating them about an hour later.  Our grandchildren came over and she helped fix tacos, salad and brownies for dinner and guess who ate her weight in brownies?  It is wonderful to watch how animated she becomes when around children.  You can see she is back to raising her daughter and five boys; her old behaviors to keep them busy kick in.
Once dinner was over and as the sun went down she began to become restless and uncomfortable; not unusual for most people with dementia.  Martha rubs her hands together when she is unsettled which helps by giving us an indicator to her state of mind.  Her bright blue eyes begin to fade.  She asks my husband to take her home which we finally figured out to mean Tennessee, where she grew up with “Momma and Daddy”.  Then she wants to know if the lady of the house cares if she goes to bed.  She and I walk together upstairs to begin her bedtime routine and she says to me that she is so tired and the day has gone by so fast.  I agree and to some degree am always surprised at how much she continues to teach me every day about those living with dementia.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Mind Building Games for Seniors



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



eHow

Memory is one of the most difficult problems associated with aging. Seniors are more susceptible to degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and related dementias. One way to lower your risk of developing one of these mind-robbing diseases is to engage in mind-building games that force you to solve problems in a fun way. Find challenging games (like the ones listed below) that keep the brain active.

Computer Games

Technology allows us to use our brain in more ways than ever before. We can advance skill levels, save our results and refer back to them to follow our progress. Below are two computer games that are mind-building for seniors.

Posit Science -- Brain Fitness Program 2.0: This program ($395) has shown improvement in the memory of those who used it in the prescribed way.

MindFit: This game provides an Individualized system of mind-building games.
According to a March 2009 study at the International Alzheimer's conference in Salzburg, Austria, this game provides short-term memory improvement of 18 percent among participants age 50 and over. The price of this game ranges from $129 to $149.

Online Games

Just the act of surfing the Internet is good for seniors looking to keep their minds active. According to an article in the October 19, 2009 issue of Science Daily, "First-time Internet users find an increase in brain building after just one week."
A good online resource is Brain Games, which is a program created by Prevention Magazine (see References). The site includes links to a variety of mind-building games for seniors.

Board and Card Games

Board and card games that use strategy are also a great tool to help build the mind. Not only do the games....read all of Mind Building Games for Seniors

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Quotes by famous women

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

National Women's Day is on March 11. Here are some quotes you can use to spark some great discussions

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• Adventure is worthwhile in itself. Amelia Earhart
• Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person
at the bottom. Sandra Day O’Connor
• Giving frees us from the familiar territory of our own needs by opening our mind to the unexplained worlds  occupied by the needs of others.
Barbara Bush
Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul. Marilyn Monroe
• I do the very best I can to look upon life with optimism and hope and looking forward to a better day, but I don't think there is anything such as complete happiness. Rosa Parks
• I have become my own version of an optimist. If I can't make it through one door, I'll go through another door -- or I'll make a door. Something
terrific will come, no matter how dark the present. Joan Rivers
• If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation. Abigail Adams
• If you always do what interests you, at least one person is pleased. Katherine Hepburn
• In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can't build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery and death. Anne Frank
Independence is happiness. Susan B. Anthony
• Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless. Mother Teresa
• Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. Grandma Moses
• No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. Eleanor Roosevelt
• Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Marie Curie
• One of the things I learned the hard way was that it doesn't pay to get discouraged. Keeping busy and making optimism a way of life can restore your faith in yourself. Lucille Ball
• Thank goodness I was never sent to school; it would have rubbed off some of the originality. Beatrix Potter
• The important thing is not what they think of me, but what I think of them. Queen Victoria
• When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been
opened for us. Helen Keller
• Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning. Gloria Steinem 

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Celebrating we are family day


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

March 11 was International We Are Family Day
 
How did you celebrate it?
We celebrated it by showing everyone why the residents, family members, staff, volunteers and anyone else who visits make your facility a great family.
 


Enthusiastically we told everyone involved that there is a special bond and common goals that they all share. Also tell them that they should be proud of this family.  We mentioned that individuals in any good family work together in respectful and cooperative ways to promote a good environment for everyone.


 We played the song, We Are Family. We substituted the names of people or groups of people like CNAs, nurses, activity department employees or whoever you want to mention as being part of the family.
 
 
We did this simple activity, especially for lower functioning groups, which is to do the ABCs of peoples’ names. Especially focus on the names of people who are residents, resident family members and/or staff members. Then say that all the people mentioned are part of the facilities family. To make this activity easier, just have residents mention as many random names as they can think of. You can show the residents pictures of familiar people or you can invite staff to make a brief appearance and have them mention their name. You can then repeat their name(s) and invite residents to say the names with you. At the end of the activity, make sure to say that everyone is part of the facility family.
Another activity we did was make a family quilt. Each resident, staff member, volunteer or family member, who wanted to, decorated a piece of cardstock with help if necessary. Even though quilts are usually made up of squares, using an 8.5 x 11 piece of cardstock might be easier and less costly. When everyone, who wanted to completed his/her piece, we put all the pieces together. This showed everyone that each person is part of a bigger family. All who want to are to put whatever they want to represent themselves or their family. They used photos, drawings, fabric, paint, words anything they want to that fits on the piece of cardstock. It is amazing to see how it looked after it was all put together.
I hope you have brought warm happy feelings into the lives of your residents, family members, staff and volunteers by celebrating International We Are Family Day.

 
 
Here is one of our quilts

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

The President’s Volunteer Service Award

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Points of Light

The President’s Volunteer Service Award was created to thank and honor Americans who, by their demonstrated commitment and example, inspire others to engage in volunteer service. It is also the only presidential award that is available to the general public without having to be nominated or judged on criteria. It is an award that allows citizens to be honored and recognized for service that is important to them.
The President's Council on Service and Civic Participation (the Council is nonexistent) was established in 2003 to recognize the valuable contributions volunteers are making in our communities and encourage more people to serve. The Council created the President’s Volunteer Service Award program as a way to thank and honor service-minded Americans.
Recognizing and honoring volunteers sets a standard for service, encourages a sustained commitment to civic participation and inspires others to make service a central part of their lives. The President’s Volunteer Service Award recognizes individuals, families and groups that have achieved a certain standard – measured by the number of hours served within 12-month period or cumulative hours earned over the course of a lifetime.
To date The President's Volunteer Service Award program has partnered with more than 80 Leadership Organizations and more than 28,000 Certifying Organizations to bestow more than 1.5 million awards to the nation's deserving volunteers.
The Award
Depending on which award package is ordered, award recipients can receive:
  • An official President’s Volunteer Service Award lapel pin
  • A personalized certificate of achievement
  • A congratulatory letter from the President of the United States
Award Criteria
Any individual, family or group can receive presidential recognition for volunteer hours earned within a 12-month time period or over the course of a lifetime at home or abroad. The following are the eligibility requirements for each age group:
  • Kids: Age 5-14
  • Young Adults: Individual Age 15-25
  • Adults: Individual Age 26 +
To apply and track your hours visit The President's Volunteer Service Awards official website.

Sunday, February 22, 2015

National Vokunteer Week: Sample Letter to the Editor

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

[ORGANIZATION NAME] Announces Recognition Plans for 2013 National Volunteer Week

Local Volunteers Encouraged to Celebrate Service During National
Volunteer Week
[CITY/STATE, MONTH DAY, 2013 – ORGANIZATION NAME, ORGANIZATION
DESCRIPTION], today announced plans to celebrate National Volunteer Week, a time dedicated to demonstrating to the nation that by working together, we have the fortitude to meet our challenges and accomplish our goals.

National Volunteer Week, April 6-12, is about taking action and encouraging individuals and their respective communities to be at the center of social change discovering and actively demonstrating their collective power to foster positive transformation.

The volunteers at ORGANIZATION NAME have helped us to meet our challenges and have actively given our residents a higher quality of life by helping them in so many ways.

We will be honoring our volunteers on XXX by XXX

Friday, February 20, 2015

National Volunteer Week is Coming

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Points of Light
National Volunteer Week is a time to celebrate people doing extraordinary things through service. Established in 1974, National Volunteer Week focuses national attention on the impact and power of volunteerism and service as an integral aspect of our civic leadership. The week draws the support and endorsement of the president and Congress, governors, mayors and municipal leaders, as well as corporate and community groups across the country.
Through programs such as the President's Volunteer Service Award, Daily Point of Light Award and the Extra Mile – Points of Light Volunteer Pathway, we recognize individuals, families, nonprofit organizations and government entities and the tremendous impact they are making on our country's most critical challenges year-round.

Take action

  • Share your stories – Tell us about the impact volunteers are having in your community or through your organization.
  • Learn more about these volunteer recognition programs and how to nominate volunteers for awards.
  • For more information on National Volunteer Week, please contact Jennifer Geckler at jgeckler@pointsoflight.org.