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Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Playing Crazy Eights:A Fun Activity for Long Term Care Residents

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

What you need: Two or more players and a deck of playing cards.

How to play: One player, chosen as the dealer, deals out five cards (seven cards if only two are playing) to each player. The rest of the cards get placed face down as the stock pile. The top card on that pile is turned over face up beside the pile to start the discard pile. The game goes clockwise from the dealer, and the first player must play a card on the discard pile or take one from the stock pile. The game keeps going until someone gets rid of all of his or her cards.

The rules: To be able to play a card on the discard pile, the card must match either the number or the suit of the card on top of the discard pile. For example, if the queen of diamonds is on top, the card to be played must be either any queen or any diamond. All eights are "crazy," meaning you can play them anytime. However, you must say which suit will be played next when you play the eight card.

How to win: Be the first player to get rid of all of your cards.

What else you need to know: In a variation of this game, score penalty points for all cards left in your hand after someone wins. Face cards count as 10 points; eights count as 50 points, and all number cards count as face value. Play until someone gets 500 penalty points.

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

History of schools

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

wikipedia

In the 1800s children were dressed like little adults and, in fact, treated like adults in that they were (in the lower classes) expected to go to work as early as 5 or 6. They were probably more serious than our children; working in a dangerous factory will knock lots of foolishness out of a child. There was no such thing as a teenager and no cult of children who need to be spoiled and entertained. Girls were often married at 15 or 16 and, in the middle to lower classes, boys were expected to decide at about 10 what trade they wanted to go into, so they could be apprenticed.
There was no standard or requirement for literacy; the boys in the upper classes were fluent in Latin, Greek, often French, with some Italian. They were heavily versed in the literary classics. Their less fortunate peers went to school when they could and often taught themselves after work.
Girls in the upper classes were literate and probably knowledgeable in light literature (poetry, novels, etc.) but were discouraged from learning anything more than "feminine accomplishments": playing the pianoforte, drawing, fine needlework.
Poor girls were lucky to be able to read, but often knew something the "better" girls did not: how to run a household.
These children were also raised with a greater presence of death. Dying in childbirth was fairly common and, since birth control was illegal and unreliable, childbirth was tough to avoid. It was rare for a mother, of any class, to raise all her children without one fatality.
Fathers were often killed in factory accidents--with no OSHA to monitor working conditions. The Victorians' repulsive methods of disposing of waste generated many of the fatal illnesses they suffered.
And many people died at their doctor's hands, being bled or "cupped" for all sorts of illnesses and complaints, or treated inappropriately for under-diagnosed symptoms.
I think this climate, in which responsibility was ever-present and mourning was big business, had to have a melancholy affect on children that, luckily, our children don't have.


In the early 1900s, the wealthy children attended private academies.  The schools were houses with a few rooms in them set aside for classrooms.  They were small, with only about three or four pupils in each grade.  One teacher taught several grades in just one room.  In the private schools, girls and boys were not together. They went to separate academies.
Some of the subjects the girls learned were reading, spelling, history, arithmetic, geography and penmanship or handwriting. Sometimes they learned manners and dancing, French, drawing and how to walk and act like a young lady.
The public schools, on the other hand, were free and mostly attended by the kids who were not rich.  Boys and girls were at the same school. There was a class for each grade level with about 20 to 30 kids in each class.
n 1904, children were supposed to go to school until the age of 16; however, most kids never finished the 8th grade.  They went to work in factories, farms and coalmines to help their families.  Some went to high school and a few went to college.  In those days, very few women went to college. Even the rich girls didn't all get to go to college.
From 1910 to 1940, high schools grew in number and size, reaching out to a broader clientele. In 1910, for example, 9% of Americans had a high school diploma; in 1935, the rate was 40%. By 1940, the number had increased to 50%.[ This phenomenon was uniquely American; no other nation attempted such widespread coverage. The fastest growth came in states with greater wealth, more homogeneity of wealth, and less manufacturing activity than others. The high schools provided necessary skill sets for youth planning to teach school, and essential skills for those planning careers in white collar work and some high-paying blue collar jobs. Economist Claudia Goldin argues this rapid growth was facilitated by public funding, openness, gender neutrality, local (and also state) control, separation of church and state, and an academic curriculum. The wealthiest European nations such as Germany and Britain had far more exclusivity to their education system and few youth attended past age 14. Apart from technical training schools, European secondary schooling was dominated by children of the wealthy and the social elites.
The United States chose a type of post-elementary schooling consistent with its particular features — stressing flexible, general and widely applicable skills that were not tied to particular occupations and geographic places had great value in giving students options in their lives. Skills had to survive transport across firms, industries, occupations, and geography in the dynamic American economy.
Public schools were funded and supervised by independent districts that depended on taxpayer support. In dramatic contrast to the centralized systems in Europe, where national agencies made the major decisions, the American districts designed their own rules and curricula
In 1975 Congress passed Public Law 94-142, Education for All Handicapped Children Act. One of the most comprehensive laws in the history of education in the United States, this Act brought together several pieces of state and federal legislation, making free, appropriate education available to all eligible students with a disability. The law was amended in 1986 to extend its coverage to include younger children. In 1990 the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) extended its definitions and changed the label "handicap" to "disabilities". Further procedural changes were amended to IDEA in 1997
No Child Left Behind, passed by a bipartisan coalition in Congress in 2002, marked a new direction. In exchange for more federal aid the states were required to measure progress and punish schools that were not meeting the goals as measured by standardized state exams in math and language skills.  By 2012 half the states were given waivers because the original goal that 100% students by 2014 be deemed "proficient" prov ed unrealistic
The education and job world that young people are entering is so different from just 15 or 20 years ago, it’s not even comparable. For the first time in history we have a truly global economy and global competition. It’s completely the opposite of the Baby Boomers’ experience. Then, America was the center of the world. The Second World War had made the U.S. the most advanced and powerful nation ever seen, while our most capable competition was buried in ash and rubble. Now, not only has the world caught up, it’s educated, connected and competing for U.S. jobs that were the exclusive right of U.S. workers just a couple of decades ago.
People are all over the map with blame — bad teachers, lazy students, distracted parents, video games, junk food — which tells me no one has any real answer. I just know what I keep telling my kids: keep your eyes, ears and options open and your priorities straight because the only living you deserve is the one you earn.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Keeping Nursing Home Residents Safe during Outdoor Activities


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Now that summer has begun in the northern part
of the United States, our thoughts turn to outdoor
activities for the residents. This is a good
time to review some ways to keep the residents
healthy and happy while enjoying some fun in
the sun.
Last year was one of the hottest summers on
record. Having to stay indoors to keep cool was
difficult for the residents with heart conditions
or respiratory problems. Even residents
without these problems were advised to stay
indoors and out of the baking heat and oppressive
humidity. This can be hard when summer is
usually filled with outdoor activities and outings
to the residents' favorite places.
Now is the time to plan outdoor games, picnics,
barbecues, trips to see the residents’ favorite
baseball teams play and other out trips, walks
around the grounds of the facility, sitting outside
talking to visitors or the staff, etc. Now
that the residents are able to spend more time
outdoors, the activity staff needs to build in
some precautions when planning outdoor activities.
Exposure to the sun, insect bites, heat exhaustion,
storage and preparation of food, and
dehydration can put the residents and facility
at risk.
Before planning outings, work with the director
of nursing to develop a protocol for the differ-
...read all of Keeping Nursing Home Residents
Safe during Outdoor Activities by subscribing to

Keeping residents safe while on the go.(LIABILITY landscape): An article from: Nursing Homes

Friday, August 19, 2016

Art unlocks memories buried by dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, another reason to use art therapy with those who have Alzheimer's and related dementias

DemocrarandChronicle.com
People disappear into dementia, losing their memories, their personalities, their ability to connect as they once did with spouses and children and the world around them.

Meet Me At The MAG" is a partnership between the Alzheimer's Association and the University of Rochester's Memorial Art Gallery aimed at helping them reconnect.

It is modeled after a successful and popular program at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, says Susan Daiss, the MAG's McPherson director of education.

"It's one of several things we're doing to integrate the visual arts and health care," she says, including a program that uses works of art to teach medical students to tap their powers of observation.

Meet Me At The MAG is one of those ideas that is so obviously promising you have to wonder why nobody thought of it long ago. "Museums are places of art," Daiss says, "and art is uniquely positioned to help unleash memories."

Sevev years ago, the gallery, with the help of medical students, ran a pilot program at an area nursing home, showing slides of artwork to patients with advanced dementia. "We saw enough to know this clearly could work," Daiss says.

So one day last month — a day when the gallery was otherwise closed to the public — several people with dementia and their caregivers were invited to visit the gallery. They were greeted by docents "trained to ask gentle questions such as 'What does this make you think of?'" Daiss says, "and then to follow the thread with further questions."

"One of the first paintings we saw was of two oak trees in Geneseo," says Joe Gersitz of Penfield, whose wife, Marion, has early-stage dementia. "Then we looked at a still-life of fruits and vegetables, with a girl sitting at a table crying from peeling onions." The art is meant to evoke emotions and tweak the senses, Gersitz says, and it did just that.

The art is carefully selected, Daiss says. "We look for works with a strong narrative content and the potential for association. We used a beautiful landscape of the Genesee River Valley by Asher B. Durand (a New York painter), and we used Norman Rockwell's Soldier on Leave from 1944. It shows a scene in a train where a number of couples are seated, but their faces are not visible. There is a young man in uniform, and there is a gardenia in the hair of a young woman." When the visitors looked at that painting, "the memories...............read the whole article

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Easy movements for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Looking for easy exercises for your residents. Here is a list. Attach familiar thoughts to them if you wish such as saying hello to you neighbor on your left or right for moving your head from side to side

Neck side to side
Shoulder shrugs
Bicep curls
Paddling a canoe
Tricep curls single
together
Climbing the ladder
Bent arm raises with a twist
Rowing a boat
Side arm raises
Front arm raises
Pour and hug
Hug yourself
Hand clapping
Punching
Swimming  front crawl
Breast stroke
Drum tapping
Windshield wipers
Chopping wood
Rocking a baby
Throwing a baseball
Throwing a basketball
Smiling
Saying the vowels
Waving a flag
Whole world
Hammering the weasel down
Hand rolling
Waves in the ocean
Head shoulders knees and knees

Monday, August 15, 2016

More about dementia tools

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


What I did not say is that both these books are extremenly useful tools for CNAs

Here is what Vernessa LuShaun Burgess, CNA from Delray Beach, Florida had to say

The book was very insightful. I especially enjoyed the pictures that the staff
and family can use. They will help me communicate with the memory challenged and
provide a personal touch while I am doing it. The ideas were also very helpful
because they involve an involve people with all stages of dementia and can
easily be adapted for verbal and nonverbalindividuals. I give the book two
thumbs up.
Thus have several copies of each book around so they(the CNAs) will be able to engage dementia residents more easily

Also you may want to check out the post on May 30,Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia
Your comments, please

Simple Fan Craft

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Homemadesimple
Perfect for hot weather entertaining, our handmade paper fans are both stylish and functional. Create your own with our simple step-by-step instructions, then use them at your next celebration or as a sweet decorative touch indoors.
How to Make a Paper Fan
To get started, simply download and print a fan template of your choosing, then gather these materials and follow our easy instructions to assemble:

Materials
Cardstock, 8.5” x 11”
Scissors
Scrapbook paper, color(s) of your choice
Pencil
Craft stick
Tape
Glue stick
Simply cut out the template or for an even easier craft print o template that does not have to be cut out. Even easier use a colored paper plate or have the audience members decorate the plate beforing attaching it securely to a craft stick.
For the best results attach more than half of the crat stich to the plate leaving the rest as a handle.