Amazon SearchBox

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Flower discussion for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Flower Week is Soon. Are you ready?

FLORA'S DIAL
containing A FLOWER DEDICATED TO EACH DAY IN THE YEAR

This is an enhanced listing of the index of the book
alphabetical by Flower Names A-D

Month Day
Flower Flower Meaning
A
September
14
Acacia
Platonic Love

September
16
Adonis
Sorrowful Recollections

March
25
Allspice
Languishing

April
8
Almond Tree
Indiscretion

January
4
Aloe
Grief

December
8
Althea
Dying for love

December
29
Amaranth
Immortality

February
22
Amaryllis
Pride

December
30
Ambrosia
Mutual Love

May
1
American Star-Wort
Welcome !

March
9
Anemone
Forsaken

July
11
Angelica
Inspiration

December
31
Apple Blossom
He prefers you

December
28
Arbor Vitæ
Unchanging Affection

December
27
Ash Tree
Grandeur

July
13
Asphodel
Unending Regret

October
19
Austrian Rose
Very Lovely



B
February
27
Bachelor's Button
Single Wretchedness

December
26
Balm of Gilead
relief

April
9
Balsam
Impatience

April
10
Barberry
Ill Temper

July
12
Basil
Hatred of the other sex

July
14
Bay
Fadeless Affection

December
23
Bear's Breach
Misery

April
11
Beech
Prosperity

July
15
Belladonna
Loneliness

July
16
Bell-Flower
Constancy

July
17
Bilberry
Treachery

April
12
Bindweed
Obstinacy

April
14
Birch
Meekness

July
18
Bittersweet
Truth

June
20
Black Mulberry
I shall not survive you

June
11
Black Poplar
Courage

September
30
Blue Bell
Solitude

August
18
Blue Periwinkle
Early Love

March
11
Blue Violet
Faithfulness

September
17
Box
Stoicism

July
19
Bramble
Weariness

April
26
Bridal Rose
Happy Love

April
27
Broken Straw
Trouble ! Trouble !

July
20
Bulrush
Independence

August
22
Bunch of Currants
You please all

August
1
Burgundy Rose
Simplicity

January
27
Burning Nettle
Cruelty

September
18
Buttercup
Ingratitude

August
16
Butterfly Orchis
Domestic Quiet



C
September
19
Cabbage
Self-willed

January
3
Cactus
Ardent Love

February
28
Calla
Magnificent Beauty

July
21
Canterbury-Bell
Constancy in Adversity

December
20
Cardinal Flower
Distinction

December
19
Carnation
Disdain

May
30
Carolina Rose
Love is dangerous

December
18
Cedar of Lebanon
Incorruptibility

July
22
Celandine
Joys to come

December
17
Chamomile
Love in Adversity

May
2
Chickweed
Will you meet me ?

April
15
China Aster
True yet

September
20
China Pink
Aversion

October
14
China Rose
Grace

December
25
Christmas Rose
Relieve my Anxiety

December
24
Chrysanthemum
Cheerfulness in adversity

April
13
Cinquefoil
The Dead

December
13
Citron
Estrangement

February
13
Clematis
Artfulness

December
11
Cockle
Absence

April
1
Columbine
Folly

October
31
Common Nettle
Cruelty

December
12
Coreander
Hidden merit

December
15
Coreopsis
Always cheerful

September
21
Corn
Quarrel

December
10
Coronella
You will succeed

September
22
Cowslip
Pensiveness

December
14
Coxcomb
Singularity

September
11
Cranberry
Cure for heart-ache

December
9
Creeper
Protection

September
24
Cresses
Roving

September
25
Crocus
I am his

April
16
Crocus Blossom
Youthful gladness

August
20
Crow-Foot
Brilliancy

July
5
Crown of Roses
Virtue

August
21
Cuckoo Plant
Ardor

February
11
Cypress
Mourning



D
August
23
Daffodil
Contentment

August
24
Dahlia
Elegance and Dignity

June
4
Daily Rose
A Smile

April
17
Daisy
I share your sentiments

August
2
Damask Rose
Bashful Love

September
27
Dandelion
Coquetry

November
24
Dark Geranium
Melancholy

January
10
Dead Leaves
My love has ended

October
13
Deep Red Rose
Shame

February
12
Dew Plant
Serenade

December
7
Diosma
Good for nothing

September
26
Dock
Shrewdness

July
9
Dog Rose
Pain and Pleasure

March
6
Dog's Bane
Deceit

June
2
Double Red Pink
Unchanging Love

December
6
Dragon Plant
You are near a snare

You can use this list to have great discussions about flowers in so many different ways

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

April is Occupational Therapy Month

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

ehow

According to an article in “Age and Ageing” from 2004 in volume 33, pages 453-460, “occupational therapy interventions for elderly people in the community results in positive outcomes.” Nearly one-third of occupational therapists (OTR) and certified occupational therapy assistants (COTA) work with the geriatric population. They do a lot of types of treatments and activities, using many strategies. The main goal of helping those in the geriatric population is for them to regain or maintain the highest level of independence possible. It is the hope of most elderly people to stay in their homes as long as possible.

Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy commits to improving and maintaining the highest level of function possible of its clients so that people can have healthier, more productive and satisfying lives. Occupational therapy dedicates itself to quality health care which includes disease prevention, staying well and rehabilitation services for individuals across the lifespan. As people age, they use more occupational therapy services as a rule.

Effectiveness

Occupational therapy has been proven effective for the geriatric population, with a number of medical conditions and surgical recoveries. Besides working with individual people to increase their strength and regain important life skills, occupational therapists work with a geriatric community to counsel families, local governments and community groups to make sure that each group is doing its part to help older adults maintain their independence.

Conditions

The most common diseases, conditions and surgical recoveries that OTRs and COTAs are involved in for the elderly include: arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, broken shoulder, wrist, hip and knee replacement as well as repair or replacement of these body parts, depression, diabetes, sensory impairments and dementia. The key in geriatric care is to avoid these injuries and illnesses to begin with. To do this, OTRs and COTAs focus on adapting and modifying the performance of activities of daily living that have become difficult or impossible to do because of age-related changes, disorders or disabilities. Occupational therapy provides help with other activities that relate to geriatric clients that still work. They also find ways for elderly patients to be involved in leisure and social activities that are dependent upon the patient's capabilities and interests.

Settings
It is the aim of occupational therapy to improve the ability of elderly people so they can stay in their home. If institutionalized care is required, occupational therapy can enhance their lives there by helping them to maintain their highest level of function there, even if full recovery from a health issue is not possible.

Activities Of Daily Living

Occupational therapy focuses on ADLs because they are necessary for independent living. The basic ADLs include: going to the bathroom, bathing, grooming, dressing, eating and moving from one surface to another, such as moving from a chair to a bed or bathtub. Instrumental ADLs require more complex thinking. These tasks include things like preparing meals, using the telephone, operating a computer, managing finances and medications as well as cleaning; doing laundry, going shopping, and other errands, traveling from one place to another, which includes driving. Driving is quite complicated because it includes integration of visual, physical and mental tasks and being able to coordinate these tasks, which may be mild to moderately impaired as you age. Occupational therapy may help geriatric clients with other activities to help reduce the risks of social isolation and its detrimental consequences. They do this by assisting geriatric patients to maintain social activities they know and encouraging involvement in new ones as well as providing ways to promote continued learning and other mind-stimulating activities, which help promote feelings of self-worth and may help prevent dementia.

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Coin Trivia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are some coin trivia questions

If these questions are too difficult, make up your own such as
Which president is on an older quarter?
Which coin is the biggest?
Which coin is worth the most money?

If these questions are too difficult, then use questions
giving a choice of two answers, such as:
Which coin is worth 10 cents, the quarter or the dime?

Hip\
Pocket
Change

National Coin Week
Peter holds a shovel beside the words National Coin Week 2014, April 20 through 26.
Happy National Coin Week  National Coin Week was started to help people get to know about numismatics…the hobby and study of coins and paper money.
In 1983, President Reagan set aside the third week in April as a time for people to think about coins.  Why?  Because collecting coins can help you learn about science, history, and important people, places, and events.  Besides, lots of people find that collecting coins is just plain fun!

Friday, April 22, 2016

Dementia: Spring Story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


This story  is from

When I was little, I often helped my mother plant our family's garden. As soon as the chilly winds of Chicago winter gave way to spring, Mom would be outside with a spade, seed packets, gardening gloves, and a secret smile that had been hibernating all winter. That smile never seemed to shine as bright as on those first few days in April when she squatted in the mud with tiny seeds in her hands.
I would pull on my grubbiest jeans, choose my shovel with care, and bound across the yard before Mom could say, "You forgot a jacket!" I would kneel by her side for hours, carefully digging holes and cautiously pushing seeds into the earth with my chubby fingers. We would spend hour after hour repeating the process, until the formerly snow-smothered area barely knew what hit it!
Unfortunately, I grew up. Somehow, I found better ways to spend the first days of spring, and I threw my annual April morning job into the growing pile of childish, outgrown activities. After all, I was too old to kneel in the dirt all day planting some silly seeds. I came to the conclusion that the shopping mall needed my assistance more than Mom did.
Surprisingly, my mother never said much about my decision until two years ago, the spring I turned 14. I was on my way to a friend's house, when Mom stopped me.
"Would you please help me with the planting today?" she asked.
"Oh, Mom, I was just getting ready to leave," I pouted. "I'll probably be gone most of the day." "Well, could you possibly come home a little early and join me in the fresh air?" Mom asked.
I mumbled something along the lines of, "Uh, maybe . . . I'll see."
By the time I left the house, Mom was already in the garden. She looked up for a moment as I walked past, and from the corner of my eye I saw a certain pain and sadness in her gaze. At first my heart told me I should stay to help, but as I got farther from home and closer to an exciting day of hanging out with friends, I forgot my impulse.
A few hours later, as the sun started to fall from its place in the warm, spring sky, I decided to leave my friends a bit early and head back home.
"Mom usually finishes planting around six," I thought. "If I get back soon, I'll still have an hour or so to help her." I felt very noble for my selfless decision. But when I reached home, there were Mom's dirty boots by the door and a small pile of empty seed packets on top of the garbage can. I was too late.
I didn't think much about that day until nearly a year later.
One of my father's good friends suddenly lost his wife to cancer. The doctors hadn't discovered Sara's illness until it was too late. She died shortly after the diagnosis, leaving behind her husband and two small, confused children.
Right away, Mom went south to visit the family and see how the children, David and Rachel, were coping with the sudden loss of their mother. She spent a few hours with little Rachel. When she came home, she told me this story.
When Sara had received her terminal diagnosis, she asked her husband, "What should I leave our children? How do I give them something to remember me by, a symbol of my love for as long as they live?"
Mom learned the answer from Rachel.
"Mommy made me my own garden," Rachel cooed, as she tugged on Mom's hand and led her outdoors. Sara had decided to plant her children something that would live on long after she was gone.
Although the children had helped with the original planting, it was obvious that most of the work had been patiently completed by their mother. The result was a masterpiece, with so much more among the leaves and petals than simple foliage. A piece of Sara's heart and soul was left in full bloom for her children.
As I listened to my mother tearfully tell Sara's story, I realized the true power of a garden. How had I missed it? Our annual planting was not about kneeling in dirt, throwing in some seeds, and hoping for the best. It was about kneeling there together, planting potential life, and creating the best memories possible out of those moments together. I was so lucky to have a healthy, vibrant, caring mother who was always there for me. As I suddenly realized how badly I missed seeing her soft hands place seeds in mine, many things became clear. I began to understand that the pain I had seen in her eyes that day a year ago had come from missing the little girl who was once at her side.
A few weeks later, I came home to find several bags of seeds on the kitchen table. I knew spring planting was near. The following Sunday, I woke to rays of sunlight streaming through my window. I looked outside to see a figure stooping in the dirt. I threw on the first clothes I could find and ran outside.
The first rays that encircled me were the ones streaming from my mother's smile. The first water our seeds encountered were the teardrops sliding happily from my eyes. We worked together all day and didn't stop until nightfall.
I won't ever miss planting day again.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Great dementia caregiver info

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition] 

Here is a great wersite for caregivers CARE4ELDERS



Let me know what you think!

  •  

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Top ways to help a veteran with dementia on Memorial day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

  • Veterans who suffer from various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer disease, often have very specific care needs. It is important that these veterans are cared for by people who understand their condition and have the appropriate instruction and skills. Therefore encourage family members of veterans to gain the training they need to care for their loved one with dementia.

  • For those in nursing homes and other institutions, make sure veterans with dementia are visited often. All people, including those with memory loss, need human contact. They need to be hugged. They need to hear your voice. They may not know you but as long as you know who they are, that's all that matters.

  • Talk to them about their service to our country. Often they will share stories with you because their time in the service made a huge impression on them 

  • Tell them how proud you are of them. Thank them for their service. This is sure to make them feel good. Most likely, it will make them smile

  • Smile with a veteran. Laughter is wonderful medicine.

  • Sing patriotic songs with a veteran with dementia. Often they will be able o sing many familiar songs even though, they may not be able to speak.

  • Read to them. Have them read to you. Large simple statements are best.
  • Share pictures with them, especially large colorful ones

  • Make a visitor's packet for them.

  • For more ideas on things you can do with a veteran or anyone with dementia on this Memorial Day or any day, read the book, Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, 
  • Their Loved Ones, and Involved Professionals 

  • So please remember all our veterans on Memorial Day including those with dementia


Monday, April 11, 2016

Sensational ideas for those with dementia and other nursing home residents(Part 5)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two


USA Today

Sight
Your friend crosses the finish line first. A smiling child blows out her birthday candles. The sun sets in the Smoky Mountains. Fully 70 percent of the sensory info that defines our world is visual. The images we see help construct setting, mood, and memory. As with all our senses, what we see can insulate us from harm (train coming) and envelop us with delight (that fabulous Judith Leiber clutch that's been calling your name).
To keep those images in clear focus, you know the drill: Wear sunglasses, eat right, and don't smoke. Unfortunately, aging plays a role in vision loss, too. "For many, by age 40, the ability to see objects close-up becomes distorted," says Elizabeth Johnson, Ph.D., nutritional scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Nutrition Research Center at Tufts University. Our eyes also respond more slowly to dim light. The good news is you can protect and perk up your peepers.
Try some eye candy. Foods rich in nutrients, such as green leafy vegetables, fish, and fresh fruit, will keep your eyes healthy.
Rise and shine. Do outdoor activities such as jogging early in the morning, when pollution levels tend to be lower. Always wear your shades. And change your route to give your eyes fresh stimuli.
Go 3-D. The Earth may not be flat, but most of what we look at -- from computers to TV -- is. Give your eyes a 3-D workout: Spend a few minutes with a Magic Eye book. Or look out your window at the layers -- the window blinds, the trees outside, the sky behind the trees. Who knew your life was so deep?
Paint with your eyes. Draw this magazine with your eyes. Go up and around the page, around your hands holding it, the image on your page. Or follow a goldfish as it darts around its bowl. Instant eye exercise!
See more clearly. Just a few minutes of resting your eyes can have a big impact on how well you see. Cover your open eyes with your palms until you can see only darkness. When you take your hands away, your world will be brighter and crisper.

Come back for more