Amazon SearchBox

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

More activity ideas for fall

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Exercise Programs: November Stretch, Fall Fanbourines, Pumpkin Pass, Autumn Moves, Fall Fitness, Up And At ‘Em, Rhythm Band, Pilgrim’s Parachute, Thanksgiving Stretch, Work Off The Turkey, Swaying Scarves, Let’s Get Moving: Put on some soothing music and lead your residents in very slow, gentle movements such as stretching out arms, hands, moving their heads slowly side to side etc. Demonstrate the movements for them and or help them by lifting their arms etc. You can add props to your exercise programs to make it more stimulating and promote additional movement. Try scarves, batons, streamers etc. courtesy of activitytherapy.com

Healthcare professionals:Access your CEU or Certification courses on your mobile device

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Access your CEU or Certification courses on your mobile device!
easyceu
If you're as busy these days as I am, you know how great it is to be able to get some of the "to-dos" off your list while waiting in line, on the train or bus, or in those few minutes between appointments.

I've come to LOVE my iPad and iPhone for this purpose.  I can read a few pages of the novel I'm really into, grab a couple of emails on the go, catch up with work or agonize about yet another obscure NY Times crossword clue.  One thing is for sure - I'm wired in and loving it!

If you're nearing your renewal month for your CEUs, take a minute of your time - from your desktop or your mobile - to check out all the new courses we offer on
easyceu
.  We've added a significant number of new, leadership level courses through a recent acquisition - I know you'll find them interesting, useful and value-priced, too!

We're also VERY excited about the new Certificate courses we've added, including:
Assisted Living Administrator Certification (also NAB approved!)
Assisted Living Nurse Certification
Nursing Facility Administrator in Training
Nursing Facility Director of Nursing Certification
Whether you want to advance up the career ladder yourself with these additional Certifications, or you want to build the professional skills and reputation of your team, these are valuable additions!  Imagine your resume or your team's credentials with these Certification courses listed... you get the picture!

And try getting your CEUs on your mobile phone, iPad or other on-the-go device today!
easyceu

NEW Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of Older Adults - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu


NEW Cultural Diversity and Care of the Elderly - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu


NEW Ethical Issues in Health Services Management - 3.75 CEUs
easyceu

   
NEW Falling and Older Adults - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu
  

NEW Grief, Dying and Death - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu
  
 
NEW Hydration, Dehydration and the Aged - 5 CEUs
easyceu
   

NEW Infection Control in Long-Term Care - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu


NEW Leadership: The Skills Needed - 1.25 CEUs
easyceu

   
NEW Understanding and Assessing Pain in the Elderly - 6.25 CEUs
easyceu

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Top October cooking activity ideas

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here are two cooking ideas using apples that can be easily modified to accommodate a variety of diets

Apple Butter
3 1/2 cups apple sauce,
sugar, (the formula is: sugar equal to half the amount of applesauce) Use sugar substitute for folks who are diabetic
A heaping tablespoon of cinnamon,
Half a teaspoon of cloves ( optional)
Cook it on low all day in a
crock pot!

This is especially good to make on a cold fall day. The aroma of it cooking is a true sensory experience.

The Frosty Apple
Ingredients
1 pint vanilla ice cream(Use no sugar added ice cream for folks with diabetes)
1 quart naturally sweet apple cider (Use Healthy Balance Apple Drink or another low sugar apple beverage for folks with diabetes)
4-6 scoops vanilla ice cream (optional)
Freshly ground nutmeg

Let a pint of vanilla ice cream soften at room temperature or microwave it for 20 seconds. Put ice cream and cider into a blender or food processor and blend until frothy and well mixed.
Stir in nutmeg. Pour into tall glasses and top with a scoop of ice cream(optional). Remember to add the appropriate amount of thickening agent for those on nectar or honey thick liquids
Sprinkle nutmeg on top. Yield 6 one-cup servings.

Making apple smiles is an edible craft

Ingredients
Apples cut into eighths- wedge style
I put lemon juice on them so they do not turn brown
Peanut butter -use another sticky substance for those allergic to nuts
Mini marshmallows or small pieces of apples

Smear peanut butter or substitute on the apple wedge
Put marshmallows or substitute near the top.

When they are complete the finished product looks like a smile.

For those on ground diets, peel the apples, cut the apples and bake them so they are soft before use.

For those who are on a sugar restricted diet

For those on puree diets, put some yogurt or vanilla pudding on a dish of applesauce shaped like a smile.


Friday, September 23, 2016

Top Early Fall Activity Brain Boosters for Those with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Keep the Mind of People with Alzheimer's, Related Dementias, Long Term Care Residents, and Others, Active

There are many types of activities that can be done in the fall with those who have dementia. Many of the activities can be done with other long term care residents as well. Remember any activity that makes people think will go along way in slowing the decline of dementia. In addition sparking conversation as these suggested topics do, also helps to keep a dementia person's mind active.

In part one, suggested activities are related to school, trees, harvests, and apples. All of these subjects are things that are associated with early fall

School begins in the fall.
There are all sorts of activities related to going to school. The song School Days is a nice way to begin an activity based on going to school. You can also
Talk about favorite school subjects
Have a spelling bee. (You would be surprised how many folks with dementia can still spell)
Talk about lunch at school (many went home for lunch) You can still talk about a good lunch to eat while going to school.
You could make a bag lunch and have group participants guess what food is in the bag. You could have them taste the food and guess what it is

Next you can talk about trees.
See how many types of trees they can name. Make sure you give everyone who is present a turn. Give hints as needed.
Bring in leaves from various trees and see if they know what tree they are from.
You and they could make a wreath out of leaves using a paper plate rim as the backing. You can add a bow to make it look festive.
You can talk about why trees leaves turn colors in the fall.
You can ask group participants, what their favorite color is.
You could have a side discussion all about colors.
You can talk about the weather in the fall.
You can discuss Indian Summer.
You can sing songs about fall such as: Shine On Harvest Moon

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Jewish holidays and other fall activities

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two






Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

More Ways to Keep the Mind of People with Alzheimer's Disease, Related Dementias, Long Term Care Residents, and Others, Active This Fall

As with the early fall activities and discussion topics, the ones for mid fall also stimulate the mind of those with Alzheimer's disease, related dementias and other long term care residents. Keeping these people engaged in activities and conversation help to slow their loss of function. Having them keep a positive attitude also is a must

Mid fall activity topics include more about apples, but this time in combination with honey. Also on the list are the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. In addition to this, classical music and the piano are timely topics because September is national piano month and national classical music month.

The first activity idea incorporates apples, honey and the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashana. Rosh Hashana(the Jewish New Year) is most often in September, but it depends on the Jewish calendar which has goes by the moon. Simply put, Rosh Hashana is a solemn holiday. It is a time for reflection, a time when you examine your life and make amends for all the wrongs that you may have been part of during the past year. Yom Kippur is the "day of atonement" when you ask forgiveness for all your sins of the past year. There are some traditions of these holidays that everyone can enjoy

This year Rosh Hashana begins at sundown on October 2 ends at sunset on October 4. Yom Kippur starts on the evening of Tuesday, October 11 and ends at sunset on October 12.

All Jewish holidays start and end in the evening.

A tradition on Rosh Hashana is to dip apples into honey. If you do this, it is said that you will have a sweet new year. This activity is relatively easy to do. You can have a discussion about the Jewish holidays. If you have any Jewish residents, make sure to involve him/her in the planning process. They may even reveal some more easy to do traditions to you.

Also call on them often during the discussion even if they are lower functioning. You might say something like, "Bella told me she used to(a tradition she told you about or you read about) on Rosh Hashana" Bella is the low functioning resident. It will make Bella feel good.

Then you can talk about honey.

Friday, September 16, 2016

activity for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

This link http://www.tryvindale.com/Vi6UaNPn may be the gateway to an activity your loved one with mild to moderate dementia may enjoy doing.

There are no right or wrong answers, just opinions

Try it out and let me know how it goes.

By the way, it is FREE

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Celebrate Basketball Day

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two




Celebrate Basketball Day with these facts about basketball history

World Almanac for Kids

Basketball was invented in December 1891 by the Canadian clergyman, educator, and, later, physician James Naismith, then an instructor at the Young Men's Christian Association Training School (now Springfield College) in Springfield, Mass. Naismith formulated the game on the request of his superior, Dr. Luther H. Gulick (1865-1918), that he organize a vigorous recreation suitable for indoor winter play. The game took over elements of football, soccer, and hockey, and the first ball used was a soccer ball. Teams had nine players, and the goals were wooden peach baskets affixed to the walls. By 1897-98, teams of five became standard. The game rapidly spread nationwide and to Canada and other parts of the world, played by both women and men; it also became a popular informal outdoor game. U.S. servicemen in World War II popularized the sport in many other countries.

Many U.S. colleges adopted the game between about 1893 and 1895. In 1934 college games were staged in New York City's Madison Square Garden for the first time, and college basketball began to attract much interest. By the 1950s it had become a major college sport, thus paving the way for a growth of interest in professional basketball.

The first pro basketball league, the National League, was formed in 1898 to protect players from exploitation and to promote a less rough game. One of the first and greatest pro teams was the Original Celtics, organized about 1915 in New York City. They played as many as 150 games a season and dominated basketball in the 1920s. The Harlem Globetrotters, founded in 1927, a notable exhibition team, specializes in amusing court antics and expert ballhandling.

In 1959 the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame was founded in Springfield, Mass. Its rosters include the names of great players, coaches, referees, and others who have contributed significantly to the development of the game. See Basketball Hall of Fame, Naismith Memorial.

By the 1960s pro teams from coast to coast played before crowds of millions annually. Since the 1980s the NBA has become one of the most popular sports organizations in the world, due in part to the marketability of a number of high-profile star players.

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine