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Friday, February 12, 2016

A Rose Mandala to Color and Rose Facts


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is some information to help you celebrate Rose Day which i in February


Interesting Facts about Roses 

  • Copy this mandala rose picture or have your group create their own mandala art

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Haelth Benefite of Chocolate

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

The researchers caution however, that more studies are needed to confirm the link, and other factors besides chocolate consumption could be contributing to the decreased stroke risk. Also, one reviewed study showed no connection between stroke risk and chocolate consumption.
Still, the results add to a growing list of potential advantages to eating chocolate, including a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. But this doesn't mean you should gorge yourself on the candy this Valentine's day either.

Among the pros and cons of chocolate:

Chocolate can be good for you
Many previous studies have linked eating chocolate with health benefits, including:
  • A 2008 study found that people who ate a small amount of dark chocolate a day (about 6.7 grams) had lower levels of a protein that is associated with inflammation in their blood.
  • Other recent studies have found that blood platelets clump together more slowly in chocolate eaters. Clumping platelets can lead to the formation of blood clots, which in turn can cause a heart attack. Chocolate consumption may lower blood pressure, help prevent formation of artery plaques and improve blood flow, according to other research.
  • Eating chocolate may even help with math, or at least counting. A study reported in 2009 showed that people did a better job of counting backwards in groups of three after they had consumed a hot cocoa drink containing large amounts of a compound found in chocolate. These compounds, called flavonoids, which we'll get to later, may increase blood flow to the brain.
  • Chocolate may also have anti-cancer benefits because flavonoids may help reduce the cell damage that can spur tumor growth.   
"More and more research is showing that [eating chocolate] is really more beneficial than we ever imagined," said Katherine Tallmadge a registered dietician and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.
However, she notes that the advantages you get still appear to be quite small. "It's not anything major, but it's still an advantage, and even slight advantages can make a difference for some people," she said.
Not all chocolate is created equal
Certain forms of chocolate are better for your health than others, and it comes down to one key component of the rich snack: flavonoids.
These compounds, which are found in the seeds of cacao plants (from which chocolate is made), are antioxidants that are thought to help protect cells against damage that might come from environmental toxins, or simply byproducts of vital processes in the body.
Consuming flavonoids has been linked to heart benefits. But since flavonoids are bitter, most commercial chocolate goes through processing steps that remove these compounds. Less processed, or darker chocolates, will tend to have higher levels of flavonoids. Your best choice in terms of healthiness is to go with natural, unsweetened cocoa powder, Tallmadge said.
"You can have mounds of it," because it is low in calories and full of flavonoids, Tallmadge told LiveScience.
Runners-up for health benefits are bittersweet and semisweet chocolate with a high cocoa percentage, she said. Unfortunately for milk-chocolate lovers, this type of chocolate has lower levels of flavonoids.
Chocolate can be bad for you
The underlying health benefits don't give you an excuse to eat chocolate by the pound.
"Because we mainly eat it as a candy with sugar added, it's going to be high in calories and not necessarily good for you in high quantities, because it will take the place of more nutritious foods," Tallmadge said.
For instance, if you gorge on chocolate, you might skimp out on fruits and vegetables, which are also important for heart health and disease prevention.
Tallmadge advises that people who want to eat chocolate limit themselves to one ounce per day. "Any more than that and you're probably going to take in too many calories for weight control," she said.
Like the heart and blood vessels, dark chocolate can protect the brain from conditions related to high blood pressure, clots and free radical damage. Chocolate also affects the brain’s function, thereby affecting mental function, cognition and mood. One of the really good health benefits of dark chocolate!
Other foods and beverages can also provide flavonoids, including citrus fruits, onions, green tea and red wine

Yet another health benefit has been linked to eating chocolate: It may decrease your risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

The analysis, which will be presented in April at the American Academy of Neurology's 62nd Annual Meeting, reviewed the results of three previous studies. One study with more than 44,000 participants found that those who ate a weekly serving of chocolate were 22 percent less likely to suffer a stroke than those who ate no chocolate.

Monday, February 8, 2016

Valentine's Day Activities for Those Suffering from Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

With more than 5.5 Americans living with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, loved ones and healthcare professionals need to take every chance to make the lives of those stricken better and happier.

It is also important that while doing this, you stimulate a dementia sufferer's mind to make his or her decline slower.

What can you do this Valentine's Day that will be engaging, fun and exciting for someone with dementia?

What you do depends a lot on the likes, dislikes and interests of the person with dementia. Make sure you do something fun together, no matter what it is.
First before the holiday even begins, you and persons with dementia can create and send valentines.

If you decide to make the valentines, you can use construction paper, stickers, or doilies. You can precut hearts out of paper if necessary. Then ask the dementia person to place the stickers on the hearts. You may have to hand those with Alzheimer's disease, one sticker at a time. If this is too difficult, just ask the dementia person where the sticker should be placed. You can have fun with the stickers also. Stick one on your nose. Then laugh. As you know laughter is the best medicine.

Use your imagination to come up with other materials you can use to create a valentine such as: magic markers, lace, ribbon, or photographs

Remember even if the valentines do not look that good, it is the process not the product that counts.

In addition, you do not have to make the valentines. You can buy an inexpensive box of valentines. There are many that are appropriate for adults. Encourage those with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia to sign the cards. Often a person with mid stage dementia can still sign his name. If not, have him just look at the valentines. You can comment on the colors and objects on the valentines. Ask the dementia person what these things remind him of. If he needs help tell him what the objects remind you of


Saturday, February 6, 2016

Perfect Valentine gifts for those with dementia


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

You will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow Alzheimers1 on twitter


Over 5.5 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or work with? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease a Valentine's Day gift that will keep on giving long after the holiday is gone.

First on the list of gifts is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.

Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a love classic musical video or DVD. They will enjoy watching something from the good old days and singing the songs played throughout the picture. Here are a few suggestions: Singin' in the Rain, Meet Me in St. Louis, or Shall We Dance

Next is a sing a long CD or audio cassette of their favorite love songs. There is a series of these called, Old Time Favorites by Nancy Pitkin

You may want to get a sing a long video where your loved one can see and hear performers singing songs they love and are about love. A good one is, Sing-Along with Phil Bernardi: Songs We Know and Love

Here is another idea. Give a friend with dementia some hand lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he/she might have. If he/she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give him/her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels, how much you love this person, and a Valentine's Day experience you both share from the past.

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts before Valentine's Day, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit a dementia person, he/she will appreciate your company even though he/she may not be able to express it. Take him/her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or share some messages of love. Just spend some quality time with a dementia person. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting.

A phone call or a Valentine's card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

So no matter what you do, do not forget the person with dementia this Valentine's Day because it will make you and him/her feel good. What could be better than that!

Order any of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com. Order the book, Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, the audio CDs and cassettes and the videos and DVDs at seabaygame.com

These gifts are simple, inexpensive or free, and can be enjoyed by all

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Fragrance Day is March 21


Don't put up a stink about March 21. It  is Fragrance Day. It is a great smelling day. The olfactory nerves in your nose, will enjoy this special day. Ladies in particular, will enjoy today because they just love perfumes. And guys, you've gotta admit that your gal's perfume attracts you to her.

Perfumes have been in use for hundreds of years. In ancient times, they were used to hide body odors. At the time, baths were infrequent. After a few days, things began to smell less than ideal. Perfumes played an important role in making the atmosphere more palatable. Today, the daily shower eliminates the bad odors. But, we still like the smell and attraction of perfume. 

Celebrate today by buying some perfume or cologne for yourself, or  as a gift for someone. Make sure to put on just the right amount of perfume or cologne. Overpowering perfume ruins the value of the fragrance to the "sniffer".
Also, check your room deodorizers, and replace them with a new fragrance, if needed.



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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

President's day trivia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine



Who was the first president of the United States?


Which president cut down the cherry tree?


Which president was the father of our country?


Which president freed the slaves?


Which president was called,"Honest Abe"?


Name two presidents that had the same last name.


Hint: Adams, Roosevelt


Who was the oldest president?


How long is a presidential term?


How many terms can a president be elected for?




Which president said "Ask not what your country can do for you? Ask what you can do for your country?"


This question lends itself do a discussion about things persons can do for their country.


Which party starts with the letter D?


Which party's symbol is a donkey?


Which party starts with the letter R?


Which party's symbol is an elephant?


For more check this book out


Monday, February 1, 2016

How to have the Best Possible Relationship with Those who have Dementia (Part 1)

Make sure you check this out 

How to have the Best Possible Relationship with Those who have Dementia (Part 1)

Are you looking for more activity ideas for February??



Alzheimer's Care Guide

Alzheimer's Care Guide - The magazine for Alzheimer's Caregivers
The magazine for Alzheimer's Caregivers. Each issue includes a CE training article with quiz, plus free downloadable activities and educational materials.
IN THE JAN-FEB ISSUE:

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be