Amazon SearchBox

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

W. C. Fields day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]





Order W C Fields movies


W C Fields Day is April 26


Here is some info on W C Fields


(born Jan. 29, 1880, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.died Dec. 25, 1946, Pasadena, Calif.) U.S. actor and screenwriter. He was a vaudeville headliner as a juggler and appeared for seven seasons (191521) in the Ziegfeld Follies. His starring role in the stage hit Poppy (1923) brought him to Hollywood for its film adaptation, Sally of the Sawdust (1925). He emerged as a top film comedian only after the advent of sound pictures, when audiences could hear his distinctive raspy voice. His screen personalityan unlovable but hilarious con man, braggart, misanthrope, and hater of children and dogswas largely his own. Fields wrote and improvised the action for most of his films, which include comedies such as You Can't Cheat an Honest Man (1939), My Little Chickadee (1940), The Bank Dick (1940), and Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941). His only serious role was Mr. Micawber in David Copperfield (1935).
For more information on W.C. Fields, visit Britannica.com.


Here are some W C Fields quotes


Brainy Quote
A rich man is nothing but a poor man with money.
W. C. Fields


A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her.
W. C. Fields


Abstaining is favorable both to the head and the pocket.
W. C. Fields


Ah, the patter of little feet around the house. There's nothing like having a midget for a butler.
W. C. Fields


All the men in my family were bearded, and most of the women.
W. C. Fields


Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake.
W. C. Fields


Anyone who hates children and animals can't be all bad.
W. C. Fields


Children should neither be seen or heard from - ever again.
W. C. Fields


Don't worry about your heart, it will last you as long as you live.
W. C. Fields


Drown in a cold vat of whiskey? Death, where is thy sting?
W. C. Fields

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Celebrating Baseball Day with those who have dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


The season of spring is here. A person’s fancy turns to baseball.
In fact we celebrate Baseball Day in April. On my activity calendar, I have it co-inside with a home team’s game. My home team is the Boston Red Sox.

So what can we do to make this day special even for the non baseball fan.

First, we can plan a party.
This is always fun even if we do not do everything we plan.
We can make invitations and decorations.

We can read a poem about baseball at the party or at another time when it fits into your schedule.

A good poem is Casey at the Bat

Friday, April 21, 2017

Earth Day Ideas


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here are some great ideas


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Earth Day Poem
All Things Beautiful
by C.F. Alexander
All things bright and beautiful,
All creatures great and small,
All things wise and wonderful -
The Lord God made them all.
Each little flower that opens,
Each little bird that sings,
He made their glowing colors,
He made their tiny wings.
The purple-headed mountain,
The river, running by,
The morning, and the sunset
That lighteth up the sky.
The tall trees in the greenwood,
The pleasant summer sun,
The ripe fruits in the garden -
He made them, every one.
He gave us eyes to see them,
And lips that we might tell
How great is God Almighty,
Who hath made all things well.

Earth Day History

Earth Day was first suggested by John McDonnell (from the United States) in 1969 at a UNESCO Conference on the Environment. The United Nations began an Earth Day celebration on the March Equinox and continued this celebration every year since.

Responding to global warming and other environmental degradation, Gaylord Nelson (a Wisconsin Senator) called for an environmental teach-in to be held on April 22, 1970. This Earth Day involved over 2000 colleges and universities and roughly 10,000 primary and secondary schools. The main purpose of the day was to promote environment awareness and reform.

Earth Day is still celebrated on 2 days - the March Equinox and April 22nd. The April date usually involves more schools. In fact, Earth Week has evolved from this precious day allowing students, teachers and parents to have more time to learn about environmental awareness.

Earth day is intended for all of us to recognize how we influence our limited resources from our planet. There are often activities, campaigns and events scheduled on this day to promote awareness of Earth issues



Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Coin Trivia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are some coin trivia questions

If these questions are too difficult, make up your own such as
Which president is on an older quarter?
Which coin is the biggest?
Which coin is worth the most money?

If these questions are too difficult, then use questions
giving a choice of two answers, such as:
Which coin is worth 10 cents, the quarter or the dime?

Hip\
Pocket
Change



Happy National Coin Week  National Coin Week was started to help people get to know about numismatics…the hobby and study of coins and paper money.
In 1983, President Reagan set aside the third week in April as a time for people to think about coins.  Why?  Because collecting coins can help you learn about science, history, and important people, places, and events.  Besides, lots of people find that collecting coins is just plain fun!

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Easy Patriot's Day Art

A Patriot's History of the United States: From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Easy patriotic art for those with dementia

One in particular one that I like is a wall hanging

You will need:
1/2 half sheet of blue construction paper
red and white crepe paper streamers
glue or tape

Give each participant or team, 1/2 sheet of blue construction paper
Also give them about 8 inches of red and 6 inches of white crepe paper strips.
Have them cut or rip them into approximately 2 inch pieces so they have 7 pieces of about the same size
Have them glue or tape the crepe paper to the blue construction paper on the horizontal edge, alternating colors with 4 red strips and 3 white strips
The side they glue the strips to, is the back
Let the glue dry
This is a good time to sing some patriotic songs or play patriotic trivia

When they are almost dry or dry,decorate the front with star sticker, white stickers, or you can have them glue a smaller sign on the front that says
Happy Patriot's Day or they can glue a picture of Paul Revere on the front

They can put a ribbon loosely across the top so they can display their hanging

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Patriot’s Day activities for those with dementia(part 2)


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great
dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,
Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is part 2 of the Patriot's Day dementia activity

When you are discussing Patriot’s Day or any day for that matter, if the questions you ask are too hard then give the person with dementia a choice of two possible answers

Or you can say:I think it is……..

Or do not ask questions. Just make a statement with the last word or two left out. See if the person with dementia spontaneously says something to complete the phrase.

You can also play the sensory matching game adding some patriotic items like small flags or items that are red, white and blue.

What about reading part of The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere. You certainly could have a side discussion about Boston, the Revolutionary War or horses.

Come back for more

Paul Revere's Ride (part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Go to "Current Activities in Geriatric Care", to learn about activities

Poetry eserver


Paul Revere's Ride
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


part 2


Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse's side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.


A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.


It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer's dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.


It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.


It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.


You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,---
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
>From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.


So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,---
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere