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Sunday, November 19, 2017

31 types of happiness

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

ssohp

What Is Happiness?



What is happiness? Is it possible to define something so seemingly simple, yet, obviously complex?

Happiness is one of those experiences we just know as it happens. If you need to think about whether you’re happy, you probably aren’t at that moment.
Who can’t spout off a list of things that we think we need to be happy? It might include something as immediate as peace and quiet after a long day to something as futuristic as a beach house for retirement. And many things in between, from possessions to experiences.
Ironically, science has shown that wanting expensive things makes us happier than actually buying them, yet we still make dream boards of our ideal happy life and keep that ongoing happiness want list in our mind because the hunt for happiness makes us happy.
Happiness is elusive because there isn’t an exact recipe for it, no matter how much we want one.  Happiness changes with the moment we are in. We’ve all had we just  experiences that we thought would make us happy but didn’t. And we’ve all had experiences where we believed we’d be miserable and ironically experienced unexpected happiness instead.
Unhappiness also happens to the happiest of people. No one is a robot that operates at one emotional speed set on happy. We are meant to feel a gamut of emotions including happiness, but it also encompasses grief, pain and sadness. Sometimes, we need to feel our unhappiness, which ironically makes room for us to feel happiness too.
Before starting the Society I’m sure I tried virtually every “get happy” philosophy or how-to program available from the spiritual to the cognitive. I believed if I just did something better, smarter or faster, I’d be happy more often. While I certainly learned things in every program, none of them was going to make me happy all the time. I’ve always seen the silver lining in most situations, but apparently I didn’t want to have to look for a silver lining because life was always happy.
What I learned from my searching was that although you can’t be happy all of the time, you can be happy most of the time. If you want to be happy more, it’s easy — recognize more happiness that’s already happening.  After starting the Society I identified different types of happiness to make recognizing more happiness easier. Sometimes happiness is the relief and satisfaction we get when we finish cleaning the kitchen. Sometimes, it’s watching a child or pet do something that amuses us. Or sometimes it’s obvious such as going to a party. But, ultimately, happiness is about recognizing and experiencing moments of happiness when they happen.
If you want to recognize more happiness, start by taking your Happiness Inventory? You’ll discover you have more happy moments than you recognize.
If you want to know more about the 31 Types of Happiness, check out our Secret Society of Happy People 31 Types of Happiness Guide available in print (it’ll fit in your purse) and on your ereader.
Happiness is a diverse, complex, and wonderful moment that we experience in multiple forms everyday.
Below are the Secret Society of Happy People’s 31 Types of Happiness that you can share on your social media site (considering making one your social media icon for a day). Also, please tell us about last type of happiness that you experienced in the comments below.
The more happiness we recognize the happier we’ll be. The happier we are, the happier the world will be.
 Share Some Happiness What Is Happiness?

Click On Your Favorite Images …

Email them, Facebook them, Tweet them, Pin them, Google+ them or save them & take them with you wherever you go!!


Awestruck 300x300 What Is Happiness?Amused 300x300 What Is Happiness?Anticipation  300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Balanced 300x300 What Is Happiness? Blessed 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Celebratey 300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Cheerful 300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Confident 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Content 300x300 What Is Happiness? Enthusiasm 300x300 What Is Happiness? Giving 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Honorable 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Humor 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Helpful 300x300 What Is Happiness? Hopeful 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Kindness 300x300 What Is Happiness? Inspired 300x300 What Is Happiness? Joyful copy 300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Lively 300x300 What Is Happiness? Love 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Mellow 300x300 What Is Happiness? Motivated 300x300 What Is Happiness?Nostalgic 300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Peaceful 300x300 What Is Happiness?Optimistic 300x300 What Is Happiness?Relieved 300x300 What Is Happiness? Playful 300x300 What Is Happiness?
Spiritual 300x300 What Is Happiness? Satisfaction 300x300 What Is Happiness? Social 300x300 What Is Happiness?
 Thankful What Is Happiness?

Friday, November 17, 2017

Thanksgiving Activities for Those with Dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia


According to the National Institute of Mental Health(NIMH) over 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Countless others are impacted by their illness. Studies have shown that eating right staves off dementia and slows the decline of someone who already has Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia.


What can you do as a friend, loved one, or health care professional, to make Thanksgiving enjoyable and healthy.


The first thing is to keep it simple. Do not make elaborate dishes that take lots of time. There are plenty of easy healthy recipes out there. Using South Beach Diet, Zone Diet or Weight Watchers recipes is a good place to start. You can modify the recipes according to the dementia persons' likes and dislikes.


Another tip is to involve persons with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Ask them about their preferences. If they say that they do not know, help them by telling them about things you like. Say, for example, I like squash. How about you? Then talk about ways to make squash. In this way, you can discuss every item you want to have for Thanksgiving.
Have them help you prepare the food. Give dementia persons simple tasks to do. Of course, you need to know their strengths and weaknesses to choose an appropriate chore. Make sure the assignment is failure free. In other words, there is no right or wrong way to do it. While you are preparing the food, reminisce about past Thanksgivings. Do not ask: Do you remember when...? Rather say That was so much fun when we...


Have a good belly laugh while talking about the good old days. Remember, research indicates that laughter does make someone feel better.


Fill your home with pleasant soothing aromas. Making a soup before or after Thanksgiving is a good way to do this. Cook the soup on a low flame all day long to let those heavenly smells fill the air.


Do not have too many guests at the meal. Make sure to keep it low key.


You may want to have two Thanksgiving meals. One for you and one for them. The one for them need not be on Thanksgiving Day. Pick a day that you and the dementia person can spend the day together enjoying all the happiness has to offer.


Now that you have read about the tips for healthy dementia dining, go have a great day
The book Adorable Photographs of Our Baby makes a great holiday gift for someone with dementia


Wednesday, November 15, 2017

A Cornucopia of Fresh Thanksgiving Ideas

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

One of them is called A Cornucopia of Fresh Thanksgiving Ideas

It offers you, the Activities Dittector,other healthcare professional, or caregiver, a number of seasonal activities that can be adapted so they can be used on many occassions.


In a future post, I will discuss some additional tips to make thrse activities extra special

Monday, November 13, 2017

Thanksgiving gifts for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Get your loved one with dementia a perfect gift to enjoy on Thanksgiving or anytime.

Over 5.5 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or a client of yours? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, a gift that will keep on giving.

Of course, person appropriate offerings are the best. This means matching a gift to a persons interests and abilities, However, there are some presents that will make them smile no matter what.

One such gift is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.

Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD especially a musical love story. A classic movie of this type is Rogers and Hammersteins movie, Carousel (1945) or South Pacific (1949)

Any Roger's and Hammerstein movie is a good choice, However matching their interests and favorite actors and actresses should simplify the gift giving process. You can even discuss some of the movies to get a better feel for the one they might like the best.

A video sing along is great for persons who has Alzheimers disease or another dementia. Even if they were not music lovers in the past, music is extremely therapeutic for them. Often non-verbal folks with dementia will sing along to a song that is familiar to them. Russ Carlton has a series of videos that will enchant a person with dementia.

A music download or CD is another good choice. Just as with the movies, talking about songs often brings to light a good musical selection. There are some by Mitch Miller that are favorites of many. Also Broadway tunes are a preference of those with Alzheimers disease or a related dementia.

Especially for a lower functioning person with dementia is the gift of hand or body lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he/she might have. If he/she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give him/her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels and how much you love this person,

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts before Thanksgiving, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit a dementia person, he/she will appreciate your company even though he/she may not be able to express it. Take him/her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or share some messages of love. Just spend some quality time with a dementia person. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting.

A phone call or a Thanksgivings day card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

So no matter what you do, do not forget your favorite friend with dementia this Thanksgiving because it will make you and her feel good. What could be better than that?

Order most of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com or from the artists directly

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Think about National Bible Week now

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

National Bible.org





Communities are strengthened and lives are renewed by the reading of the Bible. The celebration of National Bible Week is an annual opportunity to encourage everyone in your community to begin, or to begin again, to read the Bible.


Started in 1941, National Bible Week is celebrated from Sunday to Sunday of Thanksgiving week. Many national events highlight the importance of this week – such as the issuing of a Presidential message, the entering of statementsinto the Congressional Record, and our annual dinner in New York City.


But the real celebration of National Bible Week happens when real people begin to read the Bible.


Local activities focus the attention of the community on the Bible’s spiritual, moral, and cultural values, and inspire people to engage the world’s greatest book.


You can help encourage Bible reading in your community!Here are some activities and events that will encourage everyone to read the Bible for themselves. Get involved in as many of these activities and events as possible.We encourage you to assemble a broad-based group representing all faith traditions using the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures.


Adapt the suggestions below for your community. Share with us what you do and we’ll feature iton our website. Email us at rbeni@nationalbible.org orwrite us at National Bible Association, 405 LexingtonAvenue, New York, NY 10174. 212-907-6427.(continued)


Request your public librarian to create a display of available books about the Bible (commentaries, Bible atlases,study helps) or literature inspired by biblical themes.


Encourage civic clubs such as Rotary, Lions, etc. todevote a meeting during National Bible Week to a speakerwho will develop a Bible-related theme such as the varietyof English translations, or the use of biblical principles inbusiness, etc.


Arrange for a community theater group or college drama club to perform a biblical play, or arrange for a freepublic showing of a film with a biblical theme.


Ask a community choral group or organize a mass choirfrom several houses of worship to present a public concert inwhich all selections are musical settings of biblical texts


Conduct a Bible reading marathon – a cover to cover,non-stop reading of the entire Bible – in a public place such asthe courthouse steps or in a shopping mall. The event takesapproximately 90 hours.


Create a ‘community Bible’ by asking individuals tohand-write the verses. In a larger community, youth groups ofvarious houses of worship could each take responsibility fora book of the Bible. In a smaller community, portions of theBible could be handwritten each year during November untilthe Bible is completed. The finished product might be presentedand permanently displayed in the public library.


Enlist volunteers to regularly read the Bible to theelderly who live alone or in retirement or nursing homes.


Organize a drive to collect used Bibles to be sent topeople who cannot afford to purchase a Bible of their own. Contact your state or regional Bible society or the BibleFoundation for additional information on where and how toship the used Bibles you collect.


Secure permission to use display cases at local shopsor churches to create a public display of unique Bibles ownedby community residents – antiques, large, small, differentlanguages, diglots (two languages in one edition), one carriedthrough a war.


Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaperexplaining how the Bible has impacted American culture andwhy it is important to celebrate National Bible Week.


Provide copies of National Bible Week public serviceradio announcements to each radio station in your community.Enlist a local business person to hand deliver the spots to thestation managers. Contact us at rbeni@nationalbible.org toobtain the spots.


Send press releases to all local media including informa-tion about each of the local activities you have planned. Be sureto provide the name of a contact person.

A sample press releaseis included in the National Bible Week Resource Packet.405 Lexington Avenue • 26th Floor • New York, NY 10174 • Phone: (212) 907-6427 • Fax: (212) 898-1147 • www.nationalbible.org • rbeni@nationalbible.org©1997-2007 National Bible Association.

All rights reserved.National Bible association NATIONAL BIBLE WEEK™Sunday to Sunday of Thanksgiving week each year.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

November is Alzheimer's Awareness Month



Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



November is Alzheimer's awareness month
What are you doing to find out all you can about this mind robbing disease and related dementias?
Visit this blog often to find out the latest news.
Here is what the president had to say
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America
During National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, we recognize the dignity and courage of the men and women living with Alzheimer's disease. We also honor the devoted family members and caretakers who bring them love and comfort, and we underscore our dedication to finding a cure for this tragic disease
...read the whole proclamation from 2011
Become an Alzheimer's advocate

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

"Chicken Soup for the Soul" and fairy tales

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

On Nov 12, we celebrated, “Chicken Soup for the Soul”, Day. I am sure you are familiar with “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories. They are heartwarming true short stories that bring smiles to people’s faces.

Reading “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories are a great time filler. You can have higher functioning residents, students, volunteers or staff members read these stories to the residents. I always read the stories with a lot of expression and enthusiasm asking questions as I read. This way you keep everybody’s attention.

You can find Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories online, you can borrow these books from the library or you can purchase them.

Here are some links to “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories



I hope you will shared some “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories with your residents this November and other times throughout the year.

Learn why fairy tales have some of the same positive attributes as "Chicken Soup for the Soul" stories in the February issue of the Activity Directors Today E-Magazine