Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Plan to honor CNAs


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, celebrate Certified Nursing Assistants Day,
Related image

Here is just some of what they do
C.N.A.s provide hands on care to those who are unable to care for themselves. This includes bathing, dressing, feeding and toileting residents, among other things.

The C.N.A. ensures the safety and comfort of residents entrusted to their care. Among the most prized trait in C.N.A.'s is PATIENCE. This is a job that requires much patience. Everyday they are confronted with many challenges,

A CNA rides out the storms of Alzheimer's patients right alongside of them. They are the ones who search high and low throughout the building for a misplaced item that one of the residents is desperately looking for. They are the ones who hear "I want to go home" from the lips of the residents sometimes several times a night, and comfort them the best way they know how.They are the ones offering hugs and smiles in a dark and lonely world, where many times, the staff becomes the only family a resident has.

They are their source of love, acceptance and friendship. They are the ones who try to quell loneliness and depression in the people they care for, sometimes resorting to singing, sometimes just acting silly to coax a smile. They are the ones who comfort and hold the hand of residents as they slowly slip away.

All of these things and more, that is what they are.

So plan to honor CNAs this June

Monday, May 13, 2019

Casey at the bat day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Then think spring, think baseball





Here is a nice baseball poem


Casey at the Bat day is June 3
By Ernest Lawrence Thayer Taken From the San Francisco Examiner - June 3, 1888


The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day;
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play,
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,


A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;
They thought, “If only Casey could but get a whack at that —
We’d put up even money now, with Casey at the bat.”But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,


And the former was a hoodoo, while the latter was a cake;
So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat;
For there seemed but little chance of Casey getting to the bat.But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Blake, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and men saw what had occurred,
There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.


Then from five thousand throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;
It pounded on the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,
For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.


There was ease in Casey’s manner as he stepped into his place;
There was pride in Casey’s bearing and a smile lit Casey’s face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in the crowd could doubt ’twas Casey at the bat.


Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt.
Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt.
Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Defiance flashed in Casey’s eye, a sneer curled Casey’s lip.


And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,
And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped —
“That ain’t my style,” said Casey. “Strike one!” the umpire said.


From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore;
“Kill him! Kill the umpire!” shouted some one on the stand;
And it’s likely they’d have killed him had not Casey raised his hand.


With a smile of Christian charity great Casey’s visage shone;
He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the dun sphere flew;
But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said “Strike two!”


“Fraud!” cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered “Fraud!”
But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.
They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,
And they knew that Casey wouldn’t let that ball go by again.


The sneer has fled from Casey’s lip, the teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.
And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go,
And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey’s blow.

Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright,
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and little children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville — mighty Casey has struck out.

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Top ten Memorial Day activities for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Veteran, American, Independence, Pride, Flag, Military

I cannot believe that Memorial Day
is almost here

Here are some easy, yet fun things to do together

10. Arrange flowers real of fake. You can use red, white and blue flowers to make the bouquet or centerpiece look patriotic.

9. Plan a picnic or a party from beginning to end

8. Have a picnic perhaps using the ideas from your plans. If the person with dementia does not want to go outside, no problem, have the picnic inside.

7. Go to the beach if it is warm enough or the park. Go at off times to avoid the crowd. Again if you fear a negative reaction to going to the beach, bring the beach to your home. Get some sand, sea shells and other beach paraphernalia.

6 Have a small get together at home. Hire or have someone to assist the ADRD person.

5. Draw some patriotic pictures. You can use paints, magic markers or crayons. Fireworks are easy to draw.

4. Read a patriotic story or poem. Create your own story or poem.

3. Discuss a simple recipe. See how many ingredients you can name. Give hints as necessary. Make a simple dish together.

2. Watch a musical patriotic movie. Suggestions are: Yankee Doodle Dandy and Stars and Stripes Forever
They may have to be watched in segments depending on the attention span of the dementia person.

1. Make a list of all the patriotic songs you know. Give hints to the impaired person as necessary. A good book for tips on how to do this is Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful,Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged,Their Loved Ones,and Involved Professionals Then listen to and sing these songs.

Remember all activities are person appropriate. Therefore knowing their likes and dislikes is helpful.
Also you must be flexible. If things do not go as planned, have a backup plan.

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Top ways to help a veteran with dementia on Memorial day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Image result for veteran pictures

  • Veterans who suffer from various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer disease, often have very specific care needs. It is important that these veterans are cared for by people who understand their condition and have the appropriate instruction and skills. Therefore encourage family members of veterans to gain the training they need to care for their loved one with dementia.

  • For those in nursing homes and other institutions, make sure veterans with dementia are visited often. All people, including those with memory loss, need human contact. They need to be hugged. They need to hear your voice. They may not know you but as long as you know who they are, that's all that matters.

  • Talk to them about their service to our country. Often they will share stories with you because their time in the service made a huge impression on them 

  • Tell them how proud you are of them. Thank them for their service. This is sure to make them feel good. Most likely, it will make them smile

  • Smile with a veteran. Laughter is wonderful medicine.

  • Sing patriotic songs with a veteran with dementia. Often they will be able o sing many familiar songs even though, they may not be able to speak.

  • Read to them. Have them read to you. Large simple statements are best.
  • Share pictures with them, especially large colorful ones

  • Make a visitor's packet for them.

  • For more ideas on things you can do with a veteran or anyone with dementia on this Memorial Day or any day, read the book, Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, 
  • Their Loved Ones, and Involved Professionals 

  • So please remember all our veterans on Memorial Day including those with dementia


Monday, April 22, 2019

Legal marijuana and nursing homes

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Carlo Calma


Marijuana usage among the elderly has become a growing trend, as more and more states decriminalize the use of the substance — creating a delicate situation for many skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and senior living providers.
To date, 29 states, including Washington, D.C., have legalized the medical use of marijuana, and California recently joined a smaller group of states that allow the recreational sale and consumption of the drug.
In terms of the growth in usage among the older adult demographic, findings by researchers from the New York University School of Medicine and Columbia University indicated a 250% relative increase of cannabis usage by adults age 65 and older.
With medical usage on the rise among the elderly — particularly for those who take the drug to manage pain — SNFs and senior living providers must work hard to not only comply with state and federal laws, but to also combat the stigma associated with marijuana, according to Dr. Zachary Palace, chief medical officer at Hebrew Home at Riverdale.
Based in the Bronx, New York, Hebrew Home at Riverdale is a SNF owned and managed by New York-based RiverSpring Health.
“Looking at medical cannabis as a recreational drug can limit people’s objectivity of the real benefits it can have when it’s used as a pharmacological agent [and] to treat specific diagnoses,” Palace told Skilled Nursing News. “The stigma associated with it, due to its … abuse recreationally — we need to try to remove that stigma.”
State and federal laws
Removing the stigma attached to marijuana can be a difficult undertaking, as each state has its own individual laws mandating the medical use of the drug.
In New York, for example, patients must first be certified by a physician to obtain the drug. Afterwards, they must apply with the New York Department of Health to obtain a registry identification card.
At Hebrew Home at Riverdale, the only two formats in which patients can take the drug is either in tincture form — an oil-based solution that is administered under the patient’s tongue — or in oil-filled capsule form, Palace explained.
But in addition to complying with state laws, Hebrew Home at Riverdale must also navigate through strict federal laws.
“As a SNF, we are required to follow federal guidelines in order to be able to accept Medicare and Medicaid funds for providing services for our patients, so we are held to the federal guidelines for which cannabis is a Schedule-I substance,” Palace said. “As such, having a Schedule-I [substance] in our facility’s possession would be in violation of the federal law, as well as the facility administering medicinal cannabis.”
To circumvent these federal concerns, the facility had to address how the substance was stored, and how it was administered, Palace explained.
“Our policies and procedures provide that for patients who qualify for medicinal cannabis, that they are required to maintain it in an area that is deemed to be their own personal property,” Palace said.
These patients are provided with a lockbox in their room to which only they have the key, making the storage unit their own personal possession.
With respect to administering the controlled substance, the facility requires that the patient self-administer the medical cannabis.
“If they’re not capable of self-administering the medical cannabis, then they are, by New York State law, allowed to designate up to two caregivers who would administer it for them,” Palace said.
These designated caregivers can be a family member or friend, who must also register with the New York Department of Health.
Managing and tracking
Because patients at Hebrew Home at Riverdale are self-administering the drug, the facility does not monitor the patient as they consume the controlled substance. However, staff are trained to make assessments, according to Palace.
“We do follow-up with the patient in terms of how they perceive they’re doing, if they feel a benefit from it, whether they want to continue with it or not, and their own subject to feeling of medicinal benefit,” he said.
To prevent abuse, staff are also trained to spot unusual behavior among patients who use the drug.
“If nurses observe anything out of the ordinary … that would be reported to the physician on the floor,” Palace said.
At Balfour Senior Living, medical marijuana is administered by nursing staff following a doctor’s order for the treatment.
There, staffers track usage through medication administration records (MAR), and the substance is stored and locked in medical carts at nurses’ stations, according to Eric Meyer.
Meyer serves as the executive director for the Louisville, Colo.-based  operator of continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs).
“The MAR indicates how to administer [and] how much to administer to that resident,” Meyer told SNN. “The nurse administers [the substance] and then documents how much is given to the resident, so it’s pretty much measured out.”
Providing tools similar to MARs is one of the services PDI Medical provides to patients and nursing staff. The Buffalo Grove, Ill.-based medical marijuana dispensary has become a supplier for senior care providers, and continues to make partnerships within the industry.
“I have a medication flow sheet that gets filled out and orders for products … how it’s given, and how often it’s dosed for the nurses to adhere to — very similar to a medication flow sheet for any kind of medication that gets administered,” Joseph Friedman, chief operations officer at PDI Medical, told SNN. “We do that and then we also have all of the necessary processes in place for patients and caregivers to become registered with the state.”
A furious outcry
For Friedman, education is key to combatting the stigma that persists with the usage of marijuana in the medical setting. This is especially true as U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has doubled down on the Trump administration’s opposition to recreational use of the drug, and as the Rohrbacher-Blumenauer Amendment — a provision protecting medical marijuana programs in states from federal interference — is set to expire on January 19.
“If [the government] rescinds [the amendment] and removes protections for these 70-year-old ladies that are walking into my dispensary, or moms that have these kids whose seizures are being controlled with medical cannabis, I think that’s going to create a great, furious outcry from [those who] are getting a benefit,” Friedman said.
However, the medical and long-term care industries realize the medicinal benefits of the drug, as a study published in the Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine suggests that legal access to cannabis may reduce the use of multiple classes of dangerous prescription medications.
“I think there’s a lot of validity to the use of medical cannabis for its indicated diagnoses,” Palace said. “Any medication can be abused, and medical cannabis is clearly no different. But when it’s prescribed for its approved indication, it can be a very effective alternative.”
Written by Carlo Calma

Saturday, April 20, 2019

A Mother's Day Devotional

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





Get your subscription to http://goldencarers.com 

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is a Mother's Day devotional from
Faithful Friends
Nursing Home Ministry


Half of what I think I know about mothers comes from having one. The other half comes from being married to one. In fact, I probably know more about my mother from being married to my sons' mother for twenty-two years. Here are the key things I've learned:
Mothers are the people who take Jesus at His word when He says to forgive each other "seventy times seven."

Mothers are the ones who still believe in you when everyone else begins to doubt.

Never get between a mother and her cubs. Even if you are the father, you lose.

The best gift you can give your children is to love their mother.

A mother's prayers are more powerful than any force on earth or in heaven.

A father may know best, but a mother cares best, and children will pick caring over knowing every time.

We may pray to "Our Father," but the face of God we see, the hand of God we clutch, and the heart of God we trust, belongs to our mothers.

Lord, thanks for giving us mothers so that we can see, hold, and hear You more clearly.

By Eric Fellman - Devotional From Daily Guideposts


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Her children rise up and call her blessed. . . . Proverbs 31:28 (RSV)

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Do not forget the ladies in nursing homes on or around Mother's Day



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Choosing the right present for someone with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia is certain to give him/her joyful times independently or with a loved one. Here are some tips on how to pick a perfect gift. You can give a gift anytime, but Mother's Day is coming soon which is a perfect opportunity to give that special someone a special gift.

Over 5.3 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or a client of yours? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, a gift that will keep on giving.

Of course, person appropriate offerings are the best. This means matching a gift to a person's interests and abilities, However, there are some presents that will make them smile no matter what.

One such gift is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you. Mothers especially love babies

Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD especially a musical love story. A classic movie of this type is Rogers and Hammerstein̢۪s movie, Carousel (1945) or South Pacific (1949)

Any Roger's and Hammerstein movie is a good choice, However matching their interests and favorite actors and actresses should simplify the gift giving process. You can even discuss some of the movies to get a better feel for the one they might like the best.

A video sing along is great for persons who has Alzheimers disease or another dementia. Even if they were not music lovers in the past, music is extremely therapeutic for them. Often non-verbal folks with dementia will sing along to a song that is familiar to them. Russ Carlton has a series of videos that will enchant a person with dementia.

An audio cassette or CD is another good choice. Just as with the movies, talking about songs often brings to light a good musical selection. There are some by Mitch Miller that are favorites of many. Also Broadway tunes are a preference of those with Alzheimers disease or a related dementia.

Especially for a lower functioning person with dementia is the gift of hand or body lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he/she might have. If he/she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give him/her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels and how much you love this person,

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts before Mother's day, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit a dementia person, he/she will appreciate your company even though he/she may not be able to express it. Take him/her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or share some messages of love. Just spend some quality time with a dementia person. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting.

A phone call or a Mother's day card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

So no matter what you do, do not forget your favorite lady friend with dementia this Mother's day because it will make you and her feel good. What could be better than that?

Order most of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com or from the artists directly