Monday, April 30, 2018

Dementia: Spring Story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be



Spring Chicken Soup for the Soul Story
When I was little, I often helped my mother plant our family's garden. As soon as the chilly winds of Chicago winter gave way to spring, Mom would be outside with a spade, seed packets, gardening gloves, and a secret smile that had been hibernating all winter. That smile never seemed to shine as bright as on those first few days in April when she squatted in the mud with tiny seeds in her hands.
I would pull on my grubbiest jeans, choose my shovel with care, and bound across the yard before Mom could say, "You forgot a jacket!" I would kneel by her side for hours, carefully digging holes and cautiously pushing seeds into the earth with my chubby fingers. We would spend hour after hour repeating the process, until the formerly snow-smothered area barely knew what hit it!
Unfortunately, I grew up. Somehow, I found better ways to spend the first days of spring, and I threw my annual April morning job into the growing pile of childish, outgrown activities. After all, I was too old to kneel in the dirt all day planting some silly seeds. I came to the conclusion that the shopping mall needed my assistance more than Mom did.
Surprisingly, my mother never said much about my decision until two years ago, the spring I turned 14. I was on my way to a friend's house, when Mom stopped me.
"Would you please help me with the planting today?" she asked.
"Oh, Mom, I was just getting ready to leave," I pouted. "I'll probably be gone most of the day." "Well, could you possibly come home a little early and join me in the fresh air?" Mom asked.
I mumbled something along the lines of, "Uh, maybe . . . I'll see."
By the time I left the house, Mom was already in the garden. She looked up for a moment as I walked past, and from the corner of my eye I saw a certain pain and sadness in her gaze. At first my heart told me I should stay to help, but as I got farther from home and closer to an exciting day of hanging out with friends, I forgot my impulse.
A few hours later, as the sun started to fall from its place in the warm, spring sky, I decided to leave my friends a bit early and head back home.
"Mom usually finishes planting around six," I thought. "If I get back soon, I'll still have an hour or so to help her." I felt very noble for my selfless decision. But when I reached home, there were Mom's dirty boots by the door and a small pile of empty seed packets on top of the garbage can. I was too late.
I didn't think much about that day until nearly a year later.
One of my father's good friends suddenly lost his wife to cancer. The doctors hadn't discovered Sara's illness until it was too late. She died shortly after the diagnosis, leaving behind her husband and two small, confused children.
Right away, Mom went south to visit the family and see how the children, David and Rachel, were coping with the sudden loss of their mother. She spent a few hours with little Rachel. When she came home, she told me this story.
When Sara had received her terminal diagnosis, she asked her husband, "What should I leave our children? How do I give them something to remember me by, a symbol of my love for as long as they live?"
Mom learned the answer from Rachel.
"Mommy made me my own garden," Rachel cooed, as she tugged on Mom's hand and led her outdoors. Sara had decided to plant her children something that would live on long after she was gone.
Although the children had helped with the original planting, it was obvious that most of the work had been patiently completed by their mother. The result was a masterpiece, with so much more among the leaves and petals than simple foliage. A piece of Sara's heart and soul was left in full bloom for her children.
As I listened to my mother tearfully tell Sara's story, I realized the true power of a garden. How had I missed it? Our annual planting was not about kneeling in dirt, throwing in some seeds, and hoping for the best. It was about kneeling there together, planting potential life, and creating the best memories possible out of those moments together. I was so lucky to have a healthy, vibrant, caring mother who was always there for me. As I suddenly realized how badly I missed seeing her soft hands place seeds in mine, many things became clear. I began to understand that the pain I had seen in her eyes that day a year ago had come from missing the little girl who was once at her side.
A few weeks later, I came home to find several bags of seeds on the kitchen table. I knew spring planting was near. The following Sunday, I woke to rays of sunlight streaming through my window. I looked outside to see a figure stooping in the dirt. I threw on the first clothes I could find and ran outside.
The first rays that encircled me were the ones streaming from my mother's smile. The first water our seeds encountered were the teardrops sliding happily from my eyes. We worked together all day and didn't stop until nightfall.
I won't ever miss planting day again.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

Person centered dementia activities reduce agitation in those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

DGNews

NEW YORK --  -- Both person-centred care and dementia-care mapping reduce agitation in people with dementia in residential care. In addition, person-centred approaches can be taught quickly and should be introduced as standard practice in residential care homes, according to a study released early online and appearing in the April issue of The Lancet Neurology.

Two individually tailored behavioural interventions already used widely in clinical practice, person-centred care and dementia-care mapping, have been shown to improve outcomes for people with dementia, but the evidence is mainly descriptive and observational.

To provide further evidence, Lynn Chenoweth, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia, and colleagues conducted the Caring for Aged Dementia Care Resident Study (CADRES) to examine the effectiveness of these interventions and whether they could improve quality of life, decrease need-driven dementia-compromised behaviours, or reduce the use of psychotropic drugs and rates of accidents and injuries.

The study included 15 residential care sites in Sydney involving 289 residents with dementia aged 60 years or older. Patients were randomly assigned to person-centred care, dementia-care mapping, or usual care,

Carers received training and support in the relevant intervention or continued usual care. The Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI) was used to measure 29 behaviours of agitation including biting, scratching, and hiding things. Patients were assessed before the intervention, after 4 months of the intervention, and then at 4 months' follow-up.

Findings showed that.....read the whole post

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Songs about hair



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

These songs are related to April's Activity Director E-magazine article

Wikidump

"Bangs" -They Might Be Giants; "Bald" - The Darkness; "Cut My Hair" - The Who ; "Cut Your Hair" - Pavement ;"Devil's Haircut" - Beck ; "Devilock" - The Misfits ; "Five Colours In Her Hair - McFly ; "Fixing Her Hair" - Ani Difranco ; "Get a Haircut" - George Thorogood ;

"Hair" - Hair (musical) ; "Hair"-The Early November ; "Hair" - PJ Harvey ; "Haircut" - Kevin Devine ; "Haircut Economics" - Hot Hot Heat ; "I'm So Bald" - Mr. Mason ; "I Am Not My Hair" - India.Arie ; "I Think I'm Going Bald" - Rush ; "I Won't Cut My Hair"- D-A-D ; "Le Frisur (entire album)" - Die Ärzte ; "Lend Me Your Comb" - The Beatles ; "Long-Haired Child" - Devendra Banhart ; "Man and Wife, the Latter (Damaged Goods)" - Desaparecidos ; "More Than a Haircut" - The Waifs ; "Pull My Hair" - Bright Eyes ; "Pull My Hair" - Ying Yang Twins ; "Sampson" - Regina Spektor; "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair) - Scott McKenzie ; "Screaming Infidelities"- Dashboard Confessional ;

"The girl I love she got long wavy black hair" - Led Zeppelin ; "Torra Fy Ngwallt N Hir" - Super Furry Animals ; "Who Found Who's Hair in Who's Bed? - Owen ; "You're Not You" - The Good Life ; "Suicide Blonde" by INXS ; "Short Haired Woman - Lightning Hopkins ; "Silver Haired Daddy Of Mine - Johnny Cash and The Carter Family ; "He Took A White Rose from Her Hair - The Carter Family ; "Long Blonde Hair - The Meteors ; "Ain't Got No Hair - Professor Longhair ; "Black Is the Color Of My True Love's Hair - Nina Simone ; "Dark Hair'd Rider - Heavy Trash

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Words containing hair

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas onThe Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition


Listwords

armchair
armchairs
bedchair
bedchairs
chair
chaired
chairing
chairlift
chairlifts
chairman
chairmaned
chairmaning
chairmanned
chairmanning
chairmans
chairmanship
chairmanships
chairmen
chairperson
chairpersons
chairs
chairwoman
chairwomen
cochair
cochaired
cochairing
cochairman
cochairmen
cochairperson
cochairpersons
cochairs
cochairwoman
cochairwomen
crosshair
crosshairs
hair
hairball
hairballs
hairband
hairbands
hairbreadth
hairbreadths
hairbrush
hairbrushes
haircap
haircaps
haircloth
haircloths
haircut
haircuts
haircutter
haircutters
haircutting
haircuttings
hairdo
hairdos
hairdresser
hairdressers
hairdressing
hairdressings
haired
hairier
hairiest
hairiness
hairinesses
hairless
hairlessness
hairlessnesses
hairlike
hairline
hairlines
hairlock
hairlocks
hairnet
hairnets
hairpiece
hairpieces
hairpin
hairpins
hairs
hairsbreadth
hairsbreadths
hairsplitter
hairsplitters
hairsplitting
hairsplittings
hairspring
hairsprings
hairstreak
hairstreaks
hairstyle
hairstyles
hairstyling
hairstylings
hairstylist
hairstylists
hairwork
hairworks
hairworm
hairworms
hairy
highchair
highchairs
horsehair
horsehairs
longhair
longhaired
longhairs
maidenhair
maidenhairs
mohair
mohairs
pushchair
pushchairs
shaird
shairds
shairn
shairns
shorthair
shorthaired
shorthairs
thairm
thairms
unhair
unhaired
unhairing
unhairs
wheelchair
wheelchairs
wirehair
wirehaired
wirehairs

Sunday, April 22, 2018

W. C. Fields day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]





Order W C Fields movies


W C Fields Day is April 26


Here is some info on W C Fields


(born Jan. 29, 1880, Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.died Dec. 25, 1946, Pasadena, Calif.) U.S. actor and screenwriter. He was a vaudeville headliner as a juggler and appeared for seven seasons (191521) in the Ziegfeld Follies. His starring role in the stage hit Poppy (1923) brought him to Hollywood for its film adaptation, Sally of the Sawdust (1925). He emerged as a top film comedian only after the advent of sound pictures, when audiences could hear his distinctive raspy voice. His screen personalityan unlovable but hilarious con man, braggart, misanthrope, and hater of children and dogswas largely his own. Fields wrote and improvised the action for most of his films, which include comedies such as You Can't Cheat an Honest Man (1939), My Little Chickadee (1940), The Bank Dick (1940), and Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941). His only serious role was Mr. Micawber in David Copperfield (1935).
For more information on W.C. Fields, visit Britannica.com.


Here are some W C Fields quotes


Brainy Quote
A rich man is nothing but a poor man with money.
W. C. Fields


A woman drove me to drink and I didn't even have the decency to thank her.
W. C. Fields


Abstaining is favorable both to the head and the pocket.
W. C. Fields


Ah, the patter of little feet around the house. There's nothing like having a midget for a butler.
W. C. Fields


All the men in my family were bearded, and most of the women.
W. C. Fields


Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snakebite and furthermore always carry a small snake.
W. C. Fields


Anyone who hates children and animals can't be all bad.
W. C. Fields


Children should neither be seen or heard from - ever again.
W. C. Fields


Don't worry about your heart, it will last you as long as you live.
W. C. Fields


Drown in a cold vat of whiskey? Death, where is thy sting?
W. C. Fields

Friday, April 20, 2018

Earth Day Ideas


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here are some great ideas


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Earth Day Poem
All Things Beautiful
by C.F. Alexander
All things bright and beautiful,
All creatures great and small,
All things wise and wonderful -
The Lord God made them all.
Each little flower that opens,
Each little bird that sings,
He made their glowing colors,
He made their tiny wings.
The purple-headed mountain,
The river, running by,
The morning, and the sunset
That lighteth up the sky.
The tall trees in the greenwood,
The pleasant summer sun,
The ripe fruits in the garden -
He made them, every one.
He gave us eyes to see them,
And lips that we might tell
How great is God Almighty,
Who hath made all things well.

Earth Day History

Earth Day was first suggested by John McDonnell (from the United States) in 1969 at a UNESCO Conference on the Environment. The United Nations began an Earth Day celebration on the March Equinox and continued this celebration every year since.

Responding to global warming and other environmental degradation, Gaylord Nelson (a Wisconsin Senator) called for an environmental teach-in to be held on April 22, 1970. This Earth Day involved over 2000 colleges and universities and roughly 10,000 primary and secondary schools. The main purpose of the day was to promote environment awareness and reform.

Earth Day is still celebrated on 2 days - the March Equinox and April 22nd. The April date usually involves more schools. In fact, Earth Week has evolved from this precious day allowing students, teachers and parents to have more time to learn about environmental awareness.

Earth day is intended for all of us to recognize how we influence our limited resources from our planet. There are often activities, campaigns and events scheduled on this day to promote awareness of Earth issues



Saturday, April 14, 2018

Casey at the bat day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Then think spring, think baseball





Here is a nice baseball poem


Casey at the Bat day is June 3
By Ernest Lawrence Thayer Taken From the San Francisco Examiner - June 3, 1888


The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day;
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play,
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,


A pall-like silence fell upon the patrons of the game. A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;
They thought, “If only Casey could but get a whack at that —
We’d put up even money now, with Casey at the bat.”But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,


And the former was a hoodoo, while the latter was a cake;
So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat;
For there seemed but little chance of Casey getting to the bat.But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Blake, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and men saw what had occurred,
There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.


Then from five thousand throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;
It pounded on the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,
For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.


There was ease in Casey’s manner as he stepped into his place;
There was pride in Casey’s bearing and a smile lit Casey’s face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in the crowd could doubt ’twas Casey at the bat.


Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt.
Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt.
Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Defiance flashed in Casey’s eye, a sneer curled Casey’s lip.


And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,
And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped —
“That ain’t my style,” said Casey. “Strike one!” the umpire said.


From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore;
“Kill him! Kill the umpire!” shouted some one on the stand;
And it’s likely they’d have killed him had not Casey raised his hand.


With a smile of Christian charity great Casey’s visage shone;
He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the dun sphere flew;
But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said “Strike two!”


“Fraud!” cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered “Fraud!”
But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.
They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,
And they knew that Casey wouldn’t let that ball go by again.


The sneer has fled from Casey’s lip, the teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.
And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go,
And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey’s blow.

Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright,
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and little children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville — mighty Casey has struck out.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Celebrating Baseball Day with those who have dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


The season of spring is here. A person’s fancy turns to baseball.
In fact we celebrate Baseball Day in April. On my activity calendar, I have it co-inside with a home team’s game. My home team is the Boston Red Sox.

So what can we do to make this day special even for the non baseball fan.

First, we can plan a party.
This is always fun even if we do not do everything we plan.
We can make invitations and decorations.

We can read a poem about baseball at the party or at another time when it fits into your schedule.

A good poem is Casey at the Bat

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Easy Patriot's Day Art

A Patriot's History of the United States: From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Easy patriotic art for those with dementia

One in particular one that I like is a wall hanging

You will need:
1/2 half sheet of blue construction paper
red and white crepe paper streamers
glue or tape

Give each participant or team, 1/2 sheet of blue construction paper
Also give them about 8 inches of red and 6 inches of white crepe paper strips.
Have them cut or rip them into approximately 2 inch pieces so they have 7 pieces of about the same size
Have them glue or tape the crepe paper to the blue construction paper on the horizontal edge, alternating colors with 4 red strips and 3 white strips
The side they glue the strips to, is the back
Let the glue dry
This is a good time to sing some patriotic songs or play patriotic trivia

When they are almost dry or dry,decorate the front with star sticker, white stickers, or you can have them glue a smaller sign on the front that says
Happy Patriot's Day or they can glue a picture of Paul Revere on the front

They can put a ribbon loosely across the top so they can display their hanging

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Patriot’s Day activities for those with dementia


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great 
dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,
Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

When you are discussing Patriot’s Day or any day for that matter, if the questions you ask are too hard then give the person with dementia a choice of two possible answers

Or you can say:I think it is……..

Or do not ask questions. Just make a statement with the last word or two left out. See if the person with dementia spontaneously says something to complete the phrase.

You can also play the sensory matching game adding some patriotic items like small flags or items that are red, white and blue.

What about reading part of The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere. You certainly could have a side discussion about Boston, the Revolutionary War or horses.

Come back for more

Friday, April 6, 2018

Paul Revere's Ride (part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Poetry eserver


Paul Revere's Ride
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


part 2


Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse's side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.


A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.
He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.


It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer's dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.


It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.


It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.


You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,---
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
>From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.


So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,---
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere