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Sunday, April 26, 2015

Aquariums for your residents

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

June is National Aquarium Month. With this in mind, start now getting the supplies you need to make a beautiful aquarium home for fish and something relaxing and soothing for your residents to watch. They are especially good for residents with dementia.

If you think a regular aquarium might be too much work, you should consider an artifical aquarium because they provide many of the advantages of a real aquarium but non of the work or expense. Views these aquariums to see which one is right for you and your situation.

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Friday, April 24, 2015

Choosing the right fish for your aquarium

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


LiveAquaria.com

Most beginning aquarium owners are soon overwhelmed with the large number and variety of decisions required when setting up a new aquarium. The owner must decide on the type, size and location of the tank; whether it will be fresh water or saltwater; live or plastic plants; types of filters, heaters, lights, and food; and a hundred other technical questions that must be answered for designing a properly operating tank. Unfortunately the last decision that is often made concerns the type and number of fish that are going to live in the tank. When the owner does decide on buying fish it is often done based on color and appearance. As a result, many new tanks fail to thrive and many fish perish as a result.
Questions to ask when choosing fish
The correct way to set up a new tank (after you are sure a fish tank is right for you) is to first research and decide what type of fish you would like to have in the tank. There are over 25,000 identified species of fish and over 2,000 of these are available to the aquarist. To help narrow down your list of desirable fish you need to consider all of the following questions about the potential candidates:
  • How big is the fish going to get?
  • If the fish gets large will it prey on or frighten smaller fish in the tank?
  • Is the fish too small to fit in with the other fish in the tank?
  • Is the fish territorial and will it require a large space of its own?
  • Does the fish eat other fish? Many tropical fish do.
  • Does it nip the fins of other fish?
  • Is it aggressive or is it too shy and nervous to live with certain other species?
  • Does it eat live plants?
  • Does it dig in the bottom of the tank?
  • What kind of water does it require (PH, hardness, temperature, etc.)?
  • Is it available where you live?
  • What does it cost?
  • Is it raised domestically or taken out of the wild?
  • Does this particular fish need to live in groups or prefer to live alone?
Once you have decided what fish you would like to have in your tank, then the rest of the decisions will fall into place much easier. One of the most important steps to take is to build the aquarium around the chosen fish species not the other way around. You will be much more successful and have healthier fish if you build your aquarium around the needs of the fish rather than around your desire to have an attractive tank. If you create an aquarium where the needs of the individual fish in the tank are placed first it will be both healthy and beautiful.
The type, size and location of the tank will be tailored to best suit the species of fish you choose. The filtering and heating choices will be based on the type of fish you choose. The plants, lighting, food source, substrate choice will all be tailored to provide the healthiest and most natural environment for your fish species.
Seven Categories of Aquarium Fish
To repeat what I mentioned earlier, there are over 2000 species of fish available. To help make your search for the right fish easier, I have divided the most commonly available tropical fish into 7 main categories. Each one of these categories contains fish that are similar in many of their traits, however it should be emphasized that this listing is just an outline and there are often many unique differences between fish in the same family and individual research into each specific species should be done before making your final decision.
Catfish: There are over 2,000 species of catfish each with their own unique characteristics but as a group none of these fish have scales. They are covered with skin or an armor like plating. Many catfish are used as scavengers in tanks and while many species are well adapted to this, some have very different eating habits. There is probably a species of catfish that would work well in just about any type of aquarium set up. The important thing is to find the catfish that will work best in your tank. Some things to consider when choosing a catfish are:
Catfish
  • Some catfish can get very large (over seven feet)
  • Some catfish are nocturnal and need to be fed after dark
  • Some catfish are specialized feeders and are not scavengers
  • Coarse, sharp substrate (gravel) can damage or irritate some of the bottom feeding catfish
  • Some catfish need to live in groups
Characiforms (characins, tetras, hatchetfish, pencilfish, splash tetras): This category includes a very large number of fish that are commonly found in Africa and the Americas. Some of the smaller species are very popular in community tanks. Some of the larger ones (piranhas) are more difficult and better suited to experts. Many of these species are wild caught.
Cichlids: This category consists of a large very diverse number of fish that are commonly found in Africa, the tropical Americas and Asia. The bright colors and diversity of habitat common to these species make them popular in many aquariums. The Cichlids all practice parental care which makes them more territorial. When they are guarding their young or eggs they can be very aggressive towards any other fish in the area and may even guard their nest areas when they aren't actively hatching young. This aggression makes most of them better suited to living in tanks where other species or fish aren't present. However some species (dwarf cichlids and angelfish) will live together well in a community tank if the right conditions are provided.
Cypriniforms (barbs, danios, rasboras, 'sharks', loaches, goldfish, koi): These fish are found in many locations throughout the world and the species include both tropical varieties and coldwater species such as the goldfish. Many of these species are popular in the aquarium because of their hardiness, ease of maintenance and willingness to breed. Many species are sociable and do well in a community tank.
Koi Cyprinodonts (toothcarps, killifish): These fish are usually small and live and feed near the surface. The toothcarps consist of the egg layers that can be rare and difficult for beginners and the live bearers that are popular aquarium species such as guppies, mollies, swordtails, and platys.
Labyrinth Fish (gouramis, fighting fish, combtails, paradise fish): This group of fish is very popular with the aquarist. They are generally small, hardy, peaceful fish that are well suited to community aquariums with the exception of some of the aggressive males of the fighting fish, paradise fish, and both sexes of the adult combtails.
Rainbowfish (rainbowfish, silversides): The fish from this family come from a variety of different habitats and the individual needs of each species should be researched. These fish tend to have an iridescent quality to their skin that makes them change colors as they move through the light. Most species are small, peaceful, and colorful, and make good additions to a community tank.
Conclusion
The beginning aquarium owners will be faced with a variety of decisions. If they start with researching the individual fish and their requirements and then build their tank around the needs of the fish, they will be rewarded with a healthy, beautiful aquarium that will provide countless hours of enjoyment.
References
Bailey, M; Burgess, P. Tropical Fishlopedia. Howell Book. New York; 2000.
Burgess, P; Bailey, M; and Exell, A. A-Z of Tropical Fish. Howell. New York; 1998.
Burgess, WE; Axelrod, HR; Hunziker III, RE. Dr. Burgess’s Mini Atlas of Marine Aquarium Fishes. TFH. Neptune City, NJ; 1997.

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Popular aquarium fish

 
Archer Fish. Clic
Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

The following information will be valuable when designing your June activities calendar


 
Green Tiger Barb for sale at AquariumFish.net, a tropical fish store.Green Tiger BarbClick here or on the picture to see a bigger picture.
 
Tiger Barbs for sale at AquariumFish.net, a tropical fish store.Tiger BarbsClick here or on the picture to see a bigger picture. Click here to buy Tinfoil Barbs.
 
Tinfoil Barbs for sale at AquariumFish.net, a tropical fish store.Tinfoil BarbsClick here or on the picture to see a bigger picture. Click here to buy Tinfoil Barbs.
 
Emperor Tetra. click on the picture to see a bigger picture.Emperor Tetra. Click here or on the picture to see a bigger picture.
 
Rummy Nose Tetra. Click on this picture to see a bigger picture.Rummy Nose Tetra. Click here or on the picture to see a bigger picture.
 
Wild Tetras that are possibly Red Serpae Tetras. Click on the picture to see a bigger picture.Wild Tetras that may be Serpae Tetras or a closely related species. Click here to buy Serpae Tetras.
 

Monday, April 20, 2015

Top ten zoos in the US

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

The following information will be valuable when designing your June activities calendar


10 – Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, Louisiana

Our first zoo is a charming mix of the old and new. The Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, located in uptown, dates back to the early 20th century, a heritage you can see to this day in the architecture of the older facilities. However, the 21st century brought with it major renovations so that today the park is both old-world and world-class. The most popular exhibit is the Louisiana Swamp where you can see that zoo’s famous white alligators. Too scary? Two majestic white tiger brothers are also a principal attraction drawing crowds from all over the country. The Audubon Zoo also has a large aquarium, insectarium and IMAX® Theatre.
All exhibits closed on Monday. Admission varies by attraction. (Web site)
#9 – Philadelphia Zoo in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Although it didn’t open until 1874, after the American Civil War, the Philadelphia Zoo was chartered in March of 1859, making it the oldest zoo in America and just days away from its 150th anniversary. Not only is it a fanciful, family-friendly park with 1,300 animals to discover, it’s a revered historic site celebrating the many years of successful zoology in the United States. With 42 acres to explore, you’ll want to show up early and be ready for a full day. Popular exhibits include the Big Cat Falls, home to lions, tigers and jaguars, and the Rare Animal Conservation Center.
Open daily; seasonal hours. Standard admission: $17.95. (Web site)
#8 – Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Orlando Florida
That Disney would even open a true blue zoological park left a sour taste in the mouths of many who wouldn’t trust the ethics of the company any farther than they could throw a cartoon mouse, but over ten years have passed since Animal Kingdom’s 1998 debut, and all that remains is an attractive, utterly massive zoo with wonders aplenty. Put your fears to rest: Disney’s Animal Kingdom is fully-accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Although the inclusion of rides and speculative exhibits qualifies the Animal Kingdom as a theme park, this place is the real deal.
Exhibits are divided into seven major sections, each blending natural animal habitats with various other Disney-fied attractions. The Africa section is perhaps the most popular with a walking trail designed to imitate a jungle valley in Africa and also a simulated safari experience with giraffes, hippos, elephants and much more. Combined, Disney’s Animal Kingdom houses over 1,700 hundred animals throughout the 500-acre park.
Open daily. Admission varies wildly. (Web site)
Elephants
#7 – Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati, Ohio
Another large zoo with scores of “best of…” lists to its name, the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden holds among its many distinctions an honored place in zoo history as the second zoo in the United States, having opened not long after the Philadelphia Zoo in 1875. The modern value of the Cincinnati Zoo is inherent in its vast collection of endangered species and plants, including macaws, Indian rhinos, cheetahs, Brazilian ocelots and Western Lowland gorillas. Successful breeding programs for all of these species have earned the zoo the unofficial nickname, “The Sexiest Zoo in America”.
Open daily; seasonal hours. Standard admission: $13. (Web site)
#6 – Houston Zoo in Houston, Texas
Another fairly large zoo, and certainly one of North America’s most-attended, the Houston Zoo stands out for its surprisingly modern facilities (many of the exhibits have been at least renovated in the past five years) and some interesting choices in how to see the park. Of course you can set off on you own as you might expect, but with an advance reservation the Houston Zoo offers you to set-up a private tour that will take you beyond the normal visitation parameters. Get a glimpse of all the behind-the-scenes action at the zoo, watch special feedings, see the animal hospital, and even look in on an animal training session. It costs a little more, but for true zoo-lovers it’s the experience of a lifetime.
Open daily. Standard admission: $10. Offers “free” days throughout year. (Web site)
#5 – Fort Worth Zoo in Fort Worth, Texas
Since its founding in 1909, accreditation has followed the Forth Worth Zoo, and today it has been heralded as the top zoo in the nation by Family LifeUSA Today, and the Los Angeles Times. Although the zoo is well-rounded overall, with over 350 species from every continent except Antarctica, it pays special tribute to the native flora and fauna of Texas. In the feature exhibit, Texas Wild!, can learn all about the diverse wildlife of the Lone Star State while also seeing a historic glimpse back at turn-of-the-century Texas in an authentic town recreation from the early 1900’s.
Open daily; seasonal hours. Standard admission: $12. (Web site)
Tiger
#4 – Phoenix Zoo in Phoenix, Arizona
The largest non-profit zoo in the United States, the Phoenix Zoo is a must for family vacations in Phoenix or pretty much anyone who likes to enjoy a laidback afternoon. This massive 125-acre complex differs from most modern zoos in how it structures its 1,200+ animals into four long trails covering the native wildlife of Arizona, Africa, and others. There’s also a large “touch” tank called Stingray Bay. You can guess what they’ve got there. Also unusual, the wide sprawl of the park allows for rollerblades and bicycles. It’s not just a place to see amazing sights; it’s a great place to work out!
Open daily; seasonal hours. Standard admission: $16. (Web site)
#3 – Lion Country Safari in West Palm Beach, Florida
Moving into the altogether different realm of Safari parks, Lion Country Safari near West Palm Beach, Florida is the nation’s original open-road animal attraction, and arguably it’s still the best. At Lion Country Safari, you enter in your own vehicle and drive through the zoo over 5 miles of road, more or less at your own pace. While certain animals such as lions and chimpanzees must be contained in fences for their safety and yours, others including zebras and giraffes roam freely and may even hold you up if they decide to take a rest on the road. The open-road zoo is followed up by Safari World, which hosts traditional zoological attractions as well as carnival rides.
Open daily. Standard admission: $24. (Web site)
#2 – San Diego Zoo in San Diego, California
We mulled over the placement of the San Diego Zoo at some length. Did it deserve to be number one? Maybe so, but even at number two, the San Diego Zoo stands above the crowd for its immense size, its variety and its commitment to driving the conservation and protection of animals higher than ever. Known as one of America’s most modern zoological parks, history shows the San Diego Zoo at the forefront of nearly every innovation in contemporary zoo keeping. The zoo has pioneered the use of “cageless” exhibits, and strongly promotes the use of open air attractions. With over 4,000 animals and 880 species to see, there’s truly something for everyone, but the absolute must-see is the Giant Panda exhibit, one of only four in the world.
Giraffes
Open daily. Standard admission: $35. (Web site)
#1 – Columbus Zoo in Columbus, Ohio
While any of the zoos mentioned above are worthy of the respect they have garnered, none have achieved the positive worldwide reputation of the Columbus Zoo, arguably America’s favorite. While the zoo has been open continuously since 1927, its reputation grew to such heights under direction of the amiable Jack Hanna, one the America’s most beloved animal experts. Under Hanna’s guidance, the quality of the Columbus Zoo was elevated considerably, making it what is considered today to be the aspiration of any traditional zoo. Along with over 7,000 animals, the Columbus Zoo has more recently expanded to include a water park, amusement park and golf resort.
Open daily; seasonal hours. Seasonal/special 


Saturday, April 18, 2015

Another look at activities for those with dementia


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Alzheimer's&Dementia Weekly

People with Alzheimer’s disease need to be active and do things they enjoy. However, it’s not easy for them to plan their days and do different tasks. They may have trouble deciding what to do each day or getting started with a task or activity. Caregivers can help.

Activity Planning

Plan activities that the person with Alzheimer’s enjoys in your daily routine, and try to do them at a similar time each day. He or she can be a part of the activity or just watch. Here are things you can do to help the person enjoy the activity:
  • Match the activity with what the person with Alzheimer’s can do.
  • Choose activities that can be fun for everyone.
  • Help the person get started.
  • Decide if he or she can do the activity alone or needs help.
  • Watch to see if the person gets frustrated.
  • Make sure he or she feels successful and has fun.
  • Let him or her watch if that is more enjoyable.

Try These Activities

The person with Alzheimer’s disease can do different activities each day. This keeps the day interesting and fun. Here are some daily activities people with Alzheimer’s may enjoy:
  • Household chores: Wash dishes, set the table, prepare food, sweep the floor, dust, sort mail and clip coupons, sort socks and fold laundry, sort recycling materials or other things.
  • Cooking and baking: Decide what is needed to prepare the dish; measure, mix, and pour; tell someone else how to prepare a recipe; watch others prepare food.
    • Exercise: Take a walk together, watch exercise videos/DVDs or TV programs made for older people, use a stationary bike, use stretching bands, throw a soft ball or balloon back and forth, lift weights or household items such as soup cans.
    • Music and dancing:Play music; talk about the music and the singer, ask what the person with Alzheimer’s what he or she was doing when the song was popular, sing or dance to well-known songs, attend a concert or musical program.
    • Pets: Feed, groom, walk, sit and hold a pet.
    • Gardening: Take care of indoor or outdoor plants, plant flowers and vegetables, water the plants when needed, go to school events, talk about how much the plants are growing.
    • Visiting with children: Play a simple board game, read stories or books, visit family members who have small children, walk in the park or around schoolyards, go to school events, talk about fond memories from childhood.
    • Going out: Remember to plan outings for the time of day when the person is at his or her best, and keep outings from becoming too long. Go to a favorite restaurant, park, shopping mall, or museum.

Friday, April 10, 2015

Why have a garden for people with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Designing Gardens for People with Dementia
About.com
 
Having access to a nice garden can meet so many needs for people with dementia and their caregivers. Good garden design can be part of a treatment plan for people with Alzheimer's who are very restless or agitated and who like or need to walk a lot.

Aims of Garden Design for Alzheimer's

Provides exercise, opportunities to relieve tension, frustration and aggression.

Provides personal space for reflection and privacy.

Provides a different social environment.

Provides stimulation with color, smells and sounds of wildlife.

Good Design for Alzheimer's Garden
First you need to think about the garden's design. One of the best is a figure-of-eight looped path, or similar, simple returning-path system. You can plan a garden that allows access outside but always leads the wandering person back to their house or building.
Think about visibility and observation so caregivers can relax if they use the time for separate pursuits. Good dementia garden design should cater for the able bodied as well as those who have problems with mobility.
In your garden design you will need to include places to sit and shelter from the sun and the wind. Bushes and trees provide structure and direct movement. Maximize perennial plantings, annuals do take up more time. Fill the garden with bright flowers. Place herbs, lavender and other plants so that when brushed they will release their fragrance.

Providing a Safe Garden for Alzheimer's
Safety issues are central to good garden design for people with Alzheimer's or dementia. The design should include;

Pathways that are smooth, and low in glare.

Steep gradients are not a good idea, neither are steps or low planters.

Appropriate proportion and path width is very important if you are catering for wheel chair users. As people with Alzheimer's and dementia do tend to lose physical skills and ability over time it may be a good idea to cater for mobility aids at the outset.

Use upward bevel edges on concrete walkways. This can keep wheelchairs from rolling into lawns or landscape beds.

Handrails can be used along the pathways to help those who have difficulty in walking.

In gardens you need protection from the sun and the wind throughout the four seasons of the year. Protection from the sun is very important as certain medications, such as largactil, (thorazine) or mellaril (thioridazine), can make the skin more prone to sunburn.

Use of nonpoisonous and nontoxic plants. Plants can harm people if they eat parts of the plant. Others can cause skin rashes and irritation.

Avoid dark, shadowy areas. People with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia can mistake it for negative events.

Too much light reflection or dark areas are not helpful to older people who can have problems with their sight. A number of degenerative eye conditions are common in old age.

People with Alzheimer's Love Gardening Too!
Include people with dementia in planning and designing the garden. Many people with dementia will have built up a lot of knowledge and experience about gardening. They can contribute in varying ways, from active involvement to picking their favorite flowers.

Saturday, April 4, 2015

Sensational ideas for those with dementia and other nursing home residents(Part 4)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

USA Today

Touch
Cashmere socks tickling your toes. A child's arms around your neck. A snowflake on your tongue. "The sensation of touch affects every part of our bodies," says Steven Hsiao, Ph.D., associate neuroscience professor at Johns Hopkins University. Without it, we'd have a lot less fun (hot-stone massage) and be a lot less safe (hot pan!).
Women, who typically have thinner skin than men, are lucky enough to have stronger touch sensations. But we all lose our sense of touch as we age, about 1 percent a year beginning in our 20s, Hsiao says. The good news is that the outmost layer of the epidermis is renewed continuously, and there are lots of pleasurable ways to rev up those touch receptors.
Keep it soft. The rougher your skin, the more difficult it is to sense touch. So slather on a rich cream or lotion to keep your nerve endings moist and firing.
Pat your own bunny. The areas in your brain involved in touch enlarge when exposed to new sensations. To stimulate them, try choosing your clothes by feel. You'll notice the nap of a pair of corduroys, those nubby socks, your favorite silk shirt. Celebrate the textures of the foods, too: An avocado's rough skin, silky tofu, the stickiness of a licorice string.
Get skin-to-skin. Studies show that holding hands with a partner relaxes a woman. So, too, can any kind of skin-to-skin contact such as massage, acupressure, even a lunchtime pedicure or manicure.

Come back for more

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Sensational ideas for those with dementia and other nursing home residents(part3)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

USA Today

The truth is, when it comes to our senses, we have no sense. We bolt our food, blast our iPods, freeze our feet, have to be reminded to breathe, and generally can't see the forest for the trees. Add environmental and age-related factors, and it's no wonder that "differentiating and distinguishing sounds, sights, flavors, tastes, and touches becomes more challenging every day," says Robert Butler, M.D., Ph.D., president and CEO of the International Longevity Center-USA. It's time to change all that with our sense-stimulating tricks and treats. Here's how to celebrate your senses -- and be healthier for it.
Sound
A friend laughing. Water lapping against the shore. The mellifluous harp notes in perfect sync with your sister's steps down the aisle. You can hear all those lovely sounds (and the less-pleasant -- but helpful -- screech of a car tire or rumble of thunder) thanks to a bunch of little hair cells in your inner ear. Each ear has about 15,000 of them, and they're responsible for transmitting sounds to your brain to be processed. But thanks to age and exposure to loud noise (yes, we're talking to you, the person whose iPod is so loud we can hear it from here), you're losing your (ear) hair. And that could be the precursor to hearing loss.
"As we get older, those disappearing hair cells affect our ability to distinguish high-pitched sounds, including consonants such as s, t, and f," says Marjorie R. Leek, Ph.D., of the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research in Portland, Oregon. In fact, about 30 percent of baby boomers have already suffered hearing loss. But you don't have to be one of them. Here's how.
Train your ears. You can exercise and stimulate your hearing by listening to different kinds of music. Add jazz or blues to your classical repertoire. Concentrate on what you're hearing and try to identify the different melodies or single out the different instruments.
Turn it down. Normal conversation is about 60 decibels. A portable music player with the volume at one-quarter is 85 decibels; at full volume it's 120 decibels. Enough said.
Muffle it. When you can't avoid noise exceeding 85 decibels (a subway train is 90 decibels, for example), wear earplugs or earmuffs (which can cut 15 to 30 decibels). In a pinch, donning a hat or sticking your fingers in your ears is better than nothing.

Come back soon for more