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Friday, March 29, 2013

Group activities improve mental functioning in dementia patients

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Barchester.com

Partaking in group mental activities to stimulate thought, conversation and memory improves the cognitive functioning of people with mild or moderate dementia, according to researchers.

A recent study claims that cognitive stimulation of patients through structured activities in a group setting one or more times a week for at least a month can improve the symptoms of dementia.

The sessions can include a discussion of current events, a show-and-tell, or drawing, among other activities.

According to Robert Winningham, professor at the University of Western Oregon, the study shows that patients in a care home facility could have better dementia outcomes if workers make use of interaction possibilities.

"This is showing the people who work in memory care communities and nursing homes and
assisted living facilities that they can improve cognitive function, and they need to be providing these kinds of interventions," he told Reuters.

The study contributes to the growing body of research that suggests keeping the brain active can help combat dementia.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Make your next event a success


Activities directors, other health care professionals, others who order supplies for their organizations, and caregiver groups needing supplies for large group get togethers, here is some information that will be most helpful.

As activity directors and others are responsible for planning events, you want to get supplies that are cost effective and come to you quickly. You also need supplies that are unique. Atlanta Hotel Supply has a wide variety of items that you will probably need. Ordering online is most convenient because you can do it from the comfort of your desk or mobile phone. Hotel Supplies Online  is very user friendly and has an almost unlimited array of things you will need for your next large event.

If you work for a nursing home or an assisted living facility, you can share these Hotel Bar Supplies with persons responsible for all your needs because you will find these supplies to be of high quality and you can not get things you may not be able to find from a typical vendor.

We had an Easter party the other day. We were able to get everything we needed. The party was a huge success. I am sure our next big event will be great as well.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

An invitation to Passover: Traditional Seder is rich with readings, rituals and symbolic foods

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

By Julie Wiener
Associated Press

The first time Abigail Auer attended a Passover Seder, she was eager to make a good impression and asked the hostess — also her future mother-in-law — to suggest a dish she could bring.

Auer, who is Roman Catholic, spent hours chopping and pureeing squash for a casserole.

As she spread on the bread-crumb topping, she asked her future husband and his roommate, both Jewish, "How come you can have bread crumbs, but not bread?"

"Their faces just said, 'Oh no,'" recalled Auer. Her mother-in-law, who had provided the recipe, had forgotten it included a bread-crumb topping, which the family had always left off in adherence to kosher-for-Passover laws.

When Auer's attempts to scrape off the bread crumbs failed, she left the casserole at home and brought flowers instead.

For Passover novices, an invitation to a Seder can be exciting, and a bit intimidating.

The most widely celebrated Jewish festival, Passover, which begins at sundown Saturday and is also known by its Hebrew name Pesach, commemorates the ancient Israelites' liberation from Egyptian slavery.

At a Passover Seder, a celebratory meal, the story of the Exodus is retold through readings, rituals and symbolic foods.

While some foods, such as matzo and bitter herbs, are required eating, others, including bread, are forbidden. Traditional Jews can't even store the taboo items in their homes or eat from dishes or cutlery that have touched them.

To a newcomer, the numerous rules and traditions can be overwhelming. Even veteran Seder-goers can find them confusing, particularly since the diversity of American Jews results in many different ways of celebrating.

Here's what you need to know: Come back for more info

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Best ever Easter gifts for those with dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]





Choosing the right present for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia is certain to give him/her joyful times independently or with a loved one. Here are some tips on how to pick a perfect gift.


Over 5.4 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or work with? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease an Easter gift that will keep on giving long after the holiday is gone.


Of course, person appropriate offerings are the best. This means matching a gift to a person’s interests and abilities, However, there are some presents that will make them smile no matter what.


One such gift is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.
There is an activity related to hats that is most appropriate around Easter time.


If the person is a hat lover, buying him/her a new bonnet for Easter is an extraordinary idea. It will bring back fond memories of past Easters. Perhaps you can dig out some old Easter bonnets to try on as well as talk about, together, as Susan Berg suggests in her book. You could also have fun going through an old chest of clothes,

Friday, March 1, 2013

Are you reading Alzheimer's Caregivers Guide Magazine

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Here is some information related to an activity for lower functioning residents for or around St. Patrick's Day or any other day in a past issue of,  "Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine/Current Activities in Geriatric Care"



Koosh balls, springs, bendable toys, glitter wands, squishy stars or other shapes, large pony tale holders, tissue paper, emery boards, cotton, tin foil, stuffed animals, books, folders, small pillows, cymbals, bells, scratch and sniff stickers, magic markers, paper bags, paper plates, envelopes, rug samples, napkins, jar openers, ribbon, or greeting cards. If you think of more, your ideas add them in the comment section.