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Monday, October 27, 2014

Halloween activities for everyone!

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



by Kathleen Milazzo, Chicago Recreation Examiner

Halloween is a wonderful excuse for a party and whether you are hosting one at a nursing home or having it at your own house, there are Halloween activities that everyone can participate in.

One of the most traditional Halloween activities is apple bobbing, however I even have trouble with that activity. The very young, the elderly, and the handicapped have even more difficulty and usually don't involve themselves in that game. For some it can feel as though they are being left out, but not to worry, we can fix that!

First, you need to know if you don't already that Alzheimer patients do not like water. Secondly, it's important with older individuals that you preserve their dignity, so you've got to present the activities to them carefully, especially when it's something that the young usually do. You may want to remind them that at their age they've earned the right to kick back and have some fun. You can also tell them that bobbing for apples in water is a kids game but that you've got a version that's a little more dignified for adults. Tell them they'll have fun and what do they care what anyone thinks. Finally start off by reminiscing and discussing with them how they celebrated at Halloween parties when they were young. Get them to laugh and remember if they can.

To further get them in the mood, costumes are in order. You only need to get some funny masks and/or hats. They can feel more a part of the party at little effort and cost.

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Dementia and Halloween

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Eons

Dementia/Alzheimer’s and Halloween have something in common- they are both scary! To an dementia/Alzheimer’s person Halloween can be destabilizing because of children constantly ringing the doorbell, strange decorations, confusing costumes and ghostly creaking sounds which contribute to the spirit of the holiday. This doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate, but you might want to reevaluate the ritual to see it with Dementia/Alzheimer’s eyes.

Here are some tips for a fun Halloween:

•Prepare for the celebration by discussing your plans with the Alzheimer’s person and describing the holiday dynamics like trick or treaters. For example, show your loved one a decoration and ask, “Do you like this decoration?” If he or she says, “This frightens me,” then respect this perception. Don’t try to talk him or her out of it. Most patients will be okay with pumpkins and cats; however, witches and ghosts might be unnerving.

•Keep furniture in its place. Consequently, your loved one will not become confused or even worse, bump into things and fall. Dementia affects balance and perception. Watch out for low-lying candles! It’s always easier to prevent than to treat.

•Avoid rigging up strange sounds like ghostly laughter or creaking doors because they bombard people with too much stimuli.

•Let neighbors know that candy will be placed outside the door, (the honor system), so that children will not keep ringing the doorbell and frightening your loved one. Or put up a note on the door with instructions for trick or treaters. However, if your loved one is adequately prepared and looks forward to the children at your doorstep by all means let them come in and strut their stuff!

•Know your loved one’s dietary restrictions, especially if he or she is diabetic. If you keep Halloween candy in a nearby bowl, you might be surprised that much of it will be missing. Those candy corns can give anyone a sugar rush! Instead place some healthy, colorful treats like cut-up apples with cinnamon or berry/yogurt parfaits. Bake your own pumpkin pie using wholesome ingredients as you follow a lighter recipe.

Halloween can be tweaked and personalized to communicate a meaningful updated ritual. Both you and your loved one will enjoy the current anticipation as you tap into a positive memory of past celebrations. Make decorations together to maximize the occasion. Art therapy provides positive stimulation and creative self-expression. And while you are coloring and pasting, play music in the background, preferably from your loved one’s time period, for happiness synergy.

Did you ever think that Halloween can be scary for your parents with dementia??

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

More on Hi Neighbor Month

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

What kind of relationship do you have with your neighbors? Many people today don’t even know their neighbors these days. Today show your neighbors how much they mean to you. Bake some cupcakes, brownies or frame a photo of you together and give it to them. You can give them a card to let them know they are an important part of your life. Maybe you can plan a neighborhood holiday get together. This is the time of year to celebrate your neighborhood.

 




Hi Neighbor"

“Hi Neighbor” was created to encourage people to come outside and talk with their neighbors, reconnect with those they haven’t seen in awhile and begin establishing relationships that build strong communities. Initially a one night event in June, the CRC now promotes the entire month of June as “Hi Neighbor” month. This is a great time to plan a party, do a good deed for a neighbor or just visit.

 

The History of Hi Neighbor

Do you know your neighbors? Have you taken any time recently to stop and chat with those that live near you? Many of us might answer no to both of these questions. Our busy lives and the construction of modern homes with the focus on backyard patios rather than front porches, have led to isolation among neighbors. Worthington has taken steps to change this through our annual “Hi Neighbor” night. Sponsored by the Community Relations Commission, “Hi Neighbor” began in 2001 and received international attention through media outlines throughout the United States, Canada and Britain.

The idea for this event grew from conversations that former City Council Member Courtney Chapman had with several Worthington residents. The September 11th tragedy has made many of us long for more connections with family, friends, and neighbors. Worthington City Council is supportive of this initiative to build neighborly relationships throughout the City, and asked the Community Relations Commission to organize this event. “Hi Neighbor” nights in Worthington
are meant to be informal opportunities for neighbors to get to know each other. Participants could bring along family photos of new grandchildren or recent vacations. . The possibilities are endless.
 



Monday, October 13, 2014

A Columbus Day tale for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information about Columbus Day

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Christopher Columbus

Traveling to India around the southern tip of Africa was dangerous and difficult. An Italian sailor by the name of Christopher Columbus proposed finding a new route by sailing West. Columbus thought that if they sailed West, they would eventually circle the globe, and arrive in Eastern Asia.

For seven years, Christopher Columbus traveled around Europe looking for someone who would finance his journey. The monarchs of Europe made fun of him, saying that it was too risky, and dangerous to attempt such a voyage around the globe.

Finally, Columbus arrived in Spain. For many years, Spain had been caught up in civil war. As a result, they were behind much of Europe in their development. King Ferdinand, and Queen Isabella were anxious to prove that Spain could be as powerful and successful as their neighbor Portugal.

In August of 1492 they granted Christopher Columbus the supplies, men, and ships that he needed to carry out his expedition. Columbus was given three sailing ships. These ships were named the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria.

Columbus' men were terrified that they would be lost at sea, and that they would suffer starvation. As the days wore on, these men began to turn against him. Columbus was forced to agree to turn back, if they did not find land within three days.

On the night of the second day, just before he would have had to turn around, land was sighted. Columbus and his men discovered an island in the Caribbean, which they named Hispanolia. This Island is the location of the present day nations of Haiti, and the Dominican Republic.

Columbus did not realize that he had arrived in a new part of the world. He was convinced that he was in India. For this reason, he called the natives who lived on these islands the Indians.

Columbus returned to the Americas three more times. Each time believing that he was in India. During his life, he never realized what he had discovered.




Saturday, October 11, 2014

More about Columbus Day and dementia


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Activities Directors, caregivers, and others resposible for activities

Here’s some history trivia to share with your residents:

Italian mariner Cristoforo Colombo is called Cristobal Colon in Spanish, Cristovio Colombo in Portuguese and Christopher Columbus in English.
Columbus did not set out to discover a New World. He was obsessed with finding a westward route to Asia.

In January 1492, Columbus obtained the support of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.
Columbus’ fleet included the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria. On his first voyage to the New World, Columbus commandeered the Santa Maria.

The Santa Maria was shipwrecked off the coast of what is now Haiti.
Columbus declared himself the governor of the island of Hispaniola.
Columbus made a total of four voyages to the New World, specifically the West Indies.

During his third voyage, Columbus was returned to Spain in shackles.
The first recorded celebration of the discovery of America took place in New York City on October 12, 1792 — exactly 300 years after Columbus landed in the New World.
One hundred years later, President Harrison encouraged citizens to participate in the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage.

On this day, the Pledge of Allegiance, written by Francis Bellamy, was recited publicly for the first time.

In 1937, President Roosevelt proclaimed October 12 as Columbus Day.

In 1971, President Nixon made the second Monday of October a national holiday.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Residents' rights month and materials

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Theconsumervoice.org

Residents' Rights Month is an annual event designated by the Consumer Voice and is celebrated in October to honor residents living in all long-term care facilities, including nursing homes, sub acute units, assisted living, board and care and retirement communities. It is a time for celebration and recognition offering an opportunity for every facility to focus on and celebrate awareness of dignity, respect and the value of each individual resident. The theme for Residents' Rights Month 2014 is, "Better Staffing: The Key to Better Care" with the goal of encouraging residents and others to be educated about staffing and long-term care.

Residents' Rights

Residents’ Rights are guaranteed by the federal 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law. The law requires nursing homes to “promote and protect the rights of each resident” and places a strong emphasis on individual dignity and self-determination. Nursing homes must meet federal residents' rights requirements if they participate in Medicare or Medicaid. Some states have residents' rights in state law or regulation for nursing homes, licensed assisted living, adult care homes, and other board and care facilities. A person living in a long-term care facility maintains the same rights as an individual in the larger community.
View a Consumer Voice fact sheet on Residents' Rights.
Select on a below link to learn more about Residents' Rights.

What are Residents' Rights?


Residents' Rights Guarantee Quality of Life
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law requires each nursing home to care for its residents in a manner that promotes and enhances the quality of life of each resident, ensuring dignity, choice, and self-determination.
All nursing homes are required "to provide services and activities to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident in accordance with a written plan of care that… is initially prepared, with participation, to the extent practicable, of the resident, the resident's family, or legal representative." This means a resident should not decline in health or well-being as a result of the way a nursing facility provides care.
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law protects the following rights of nursing home residents:
The Right to Be Fully Informed of
  • Available services and the charges for each service
  • Facility rules and regulations, including a written copy of resident rights
  • Address and telephone number of the State Ombudsman and state survey agency
  • State survey reports and the nursing home’s plan of correction
  • Advance plans of a change in rooms or roommates
  • Assistance if a sensory impairment exists
  • Residents have a right to receive information in a language they understand (Spanish, Braille, etc.)
Right to Complain
  • Present grievances to staff or any other person, without fear of reprisal and with prompt efforts by the facility to resolve those grievances
  • To complain to the ombudsman program
  • To file a complaint with the state survey and certification agency
Right to Participate in One's Own Care
  • Receive adequate and appropriate care
  • Be informed of all changes in medical condition
  • Participate in their own assessment, care-planning, treatment, and discharge
  • Refuse medication and treatment
  • Refuse chemical and physical restraints
  • Review one's medical record
  • Be free from charge for services covered by Medicaid or Medicare
Right to Privacy and Confidentiality
  • Private and unrestricted communication with any person of their choice
  • During treatment and care of one's personal needs
  • Regarding medical, personal, or financial affairs
Rights During Transfers and Discharges
  • Remain in the nursing facility unless a transfer or discharge:
  • (a) is necessary to meet the resident’s welfare;
  • (b) is appropriate because the resident’s health has improved and s/he no longer requires nursing home care;
  • (c) is needed to protect the health and safety of other residents or staff;
  • (d) is required because the resident has failed, after reasonable notice, to pay the facility charge for an item or service provided at the resident’s request
  • Receive thirty-day notice of transfer or discharge which includes the reason, effective date, location to which the resident is transferred or discharged, the right to appeal, and the name, address, and telephone number of the state long-term care ombudsman
  • Safe transfer or discharge through sufficient preparation by the nursing home
Right to Dignity, Respect, and Freedom
  • To be treated with consideration, respect, and dignity
  • To be free from mental and physical abuse, corporal punishment, involuntary seclusion, and physical and chemical restraints
  • To self-determination
  • Security of possessions
Right to Visits
  • By a resident’s personal physician and representatives from the state survey agency and ombudsman programs
  • By relatives, friends, and others of the residents' choosing
  • By organizations or individuals providing health, social, legal, or other services
  • Residents have the right to refuse visitors
Right to Make Independent Choices
  • Make personal decisions, such as what to wear and how to spend free time
  • Reasonable accommodation of one's needs and preferences
  • Choose a physician
  • Participate in community activities, both inside and outside the nursing home
  • Organize and participate in a Resident Council
  • Manage one's own financial affairs

Residents' Rights in Other Languages


The Center is pleased offer Residents' Rights in the following languages, English, French, Hindu, Korean (Illinois specific, not federal version) Spanish and Russian (Illinois specific, not federal version). Select on the links below to access each version.
If you have a copy of Residents' Rights in a language not listed here and would like to share it with NORC, e-mail it to ombudcenter@theconsumervoice.org. Thank you!

 

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Communication strategies can benefit dementia patients and caregivers

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Medical News

Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia represent an exponentially growing social and health care challenge for American families - not only family members who face the progressive brain disease, but also those who love them.

Many spouses of those with dementia do more than watch as their partners deal with the disease's effects on brain functioning, memory, motor skills and emotional health. They often assume round-the-clock caregiving responsibilities as their husband or wife of many years faces progressive decline. Communication can become a particularly difficult issue.

"We found that breakdowns in communication may trigger or deepen problem behaviors in family members with dementia," says Marie Savundranayagam, assistant professor of social work at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). "These problem behaviors by those with dementia, such as agitation and aggression, have consistently been linked with caregiver stress."

Through a UWM Research Growth Initiative grant and an Alzheimer's Association New Investigator Research Grant, Savundranayagam is working to identify communication strategies used by caregivers to resolve communication breakdowns.

Partners in long-lasting relationships are the focus of her research. "There's something very special about these relationships," she says. "These caregivers are less likely to place their spouses in a nursing home. They want to keep that family member at home as long as possible." New strategies can backfire

"Communication breakdowns can also result from caregivers' use of ineffective communication strategies that they perceive to be helpful," says Savundranayagam.

"Imagine the frustration that a wife, married to her husband for 40 years and now thrust into the role of caregiver, feels when their familiar conversational give-and-take no longer works," she continues. "When the wife tries to communicate differently, that strategy may work - or it may create even more problems.

"For example, the wife may think that she can communicate better with her loved one by talking slower. But that's actually the opposite of what should be done. A person with dementia will actually forget what was said in the first part of the sentence before the caregiver finishes talking."Insights from everyday interactions

Savundranayagam and co-investigator J.B. Orange, associate professor and director of the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the University of Western Ontario, are now analyzing everyday activities and communication patterns of persons affected by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Caregiver/care receiver couples completed questionnaires and were then video-recorded as they interacted in their homes − at the dinner table, for example. Communication Sciences and Disorders students from UWM's College of Health Sciences, coached by Orange, are transcribing and coding these videos to help pinpoint the types of communication strategies the caregiver is using to resolve misunderstandings.

The next step, says Savundranayagam, is assessing the effectiveness of caregiver carstrategies. "Do their approaches exacerbate a communication problem or resolve it?" Savundranayagam's work also will investigate the role of effective and ineffective communication strategies in predicting episodes of problem behaviors and caregiver stress.

The goal is to lay the foundation and justification for designing empirically derived communication interventions for family caregivers that target both problems.

"Sometimes a caregiver can deal with problem behaviors and it's not that distressing for them," says Savundranayagam. "But other times, the caregiver's appraisal is incorrect, and a strategy that they think is good really isn't. When we see that, we know that an intervention is necessary for a specific group of caregivers.

"That's really where this project is going − to target the people who will really benefit from a communication intervention," says Savundranayagam.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Noah and the Ark

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

wordofloveforyou.com/n1.htm -



“In the beginning God created a perfect & wonderful World filled with beauty & love!
But only 15 hundred years later when God looked upon the Earth...
"And God saw that the wickedness of man was great on Earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually."
God was watching all the time..."Man became so sinful and wicked, I'm sorry that I ever made him. It makes my heart feel very sad"
So while people were fighting, sacrificing their children to the idols, God decided to "Destroy man... from the face of the Earth..."
***
"But Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord."(Gen.6.7)

-"Ah, here at least is one righteous man - kind & loving & good, who is worth saving! I will speak to him & tell him what to do!"
It' Me, Noah, God!"
"-Yes,Lord"
-"Now listen carefully. I have something very important to tell you!"
"The end of all flesh is before me; for the Earth is filled with violence!...Behold I, even I, do bring a flood of waters upon the Earth to destroy all flesh wherein is the brearth of life, from under Heaven; and every thing that is in the earth shall die." (Gen. 6:13,17)"

-"Every living creature destroyed?"

-"Noah, I want you to build an Ark for the saving of your house, for you & your sons & your wife & your sons' wives! - This is how to do it..."
And that's what dear old Noah did!
He obeyed what God told him to do & got busy building the Ark.
"Thus did Noah; according to all that God commanded him, so did he."
(Gen.6:22)
-"Noah! What happened to you?
What are you doing ?"
-"God was talking to me today..."
-"God?..."
-"Yes. He told me that the world became so bad, that He has no choice than destroy it with flood! But He promised to save you and me and our sons, and their wives!"
-"But we don't have children!"
-"We will by the time we finish building the Ark!"
-"What an Ark, Noah?"
-"It's a very large boat! God said it's going to have rooms inside like a house!
It has to be big enough to hold two of every living creature & seven pairs of every clean kind of creature, & enough food for the animals & us!
***
So Noah got busy right away!
He hired workmen to cut the trees.
And the neighbors came around wondering...
Noah explained, "God told me to build a big boat, a refuge for all who wants to be saved from the big Flood...."
-"Ha, ha, ha! You mean the water will come out of the sky & drawn all of us?
Never heard such a crazy thing in my life...
Ha, ha, ha... You really make me laugh today, Noah..."

Noah had been working on the Ark for twenty years when Mrs. Noah gave birth to their first son, Japheth!

Shem was born two years later, and their youngest son, Ham, a few years after that!
the 3 sons helped their father with his big job!
***
After 120 long years, the Ark was finished!
Now it was the time to load up tons of supplies for their long voyage.
Noah still was hoping that others will repent & come on the boat
-"Come on in!
There is food enough for you all! Repent & be saved from the Flood!"
-But people were laughing at Noah, they were having real fun to look at the crazy guy, who spent all 120 years to build this boat..
"- Throw tomatoes at him"
- somebody screamed.
Rocks, eggs, tomatoes & all kind of food were flying in the air, when
suddenly..

-"Look, look at the animals! They seem to be coming towards the Ark from all directions!"
What a sight!
The people watched in stunned amazement as animals,
birds & insects of every kind made their way towards the Ark! Some came by two's, others by pairs of seven
The Great Flood is upon you! The whole world is going to be destroyed!
Come before it's too late!
But the people came to laugh at crazy Noah, so there were laughing..
Suddenly big door get closed by itself.. God closed the door..
Then the dark clouds start to move in..
***
-"Water is coming from the sky! --Just like Noah said! So the old man was right!"...
"And the windows of Heaven were opened."--
The floodgates of Heaven were opened and all the water that as above the Earth came pouring down! The desperate people, crazy with fear, started pounding on the door & shouting for Noah to let them in...But who shut this door?
God shut it. So nobody could open it!
The huge, stormy waves rolled over these wicked people and swept them all away..
***
-"Anyway,after 150 days of calm sailing, the Bible says, "And God made a wind to pass over the Earth, and the water assuaged", that means they started to dry out!(Gen.8:1)
Then one day --BOOM! SCRAPE! CREEK!
The bottom of the ship has hit the land!
The waters must be going down!
"And the Ark rested in the 7 th month, on the 17 th day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat." (Gen.8:4)
-"We've been sitting on this mountaintop for nearly 6 months now! Whew!
How much longer is it going to take for the waters to go down?"
- "I know it's hard to have patience, but we must wait on God, my Son!
When it is His time for us to leave the Ark, He will tell us!"
***
-"We've may touched the ground, but look! There
still no land to be seen besides the two peaks of this mountain!..."
To see how far the waters had gone, Noah sent out two birds!
First a raven, but he never returned..
So Noah sent out a dove!
She came back in the evening with an olive leaf in her beak!
"Praise God! This means that not only are the waters still going down, but that there are at least a few trees showing on the Land!"
One week later they let the dove to fly again. And this time the dove "returned not again unto him any more." (Gen. 8:12)
-"Then the land must be dry!"
So after being in that floating Ark for 1 year & 17 days "Noah removed the covering of the Ark, and looked, and behold, the face of the ground was dry." (Gen.8:13)
-"Let's open the door of the Ark and let all animals loose now, shall we?"
-"No, Shem! God will tell us when! He may need a little more time to grow enough plants & grass to feed the animals before we let them all out!"
***
And God spoke unto Noah, saying, "Go forth from the Ark, though and thy wife and thy sons, and thy sons' wives with thee!
Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, that they may breed abundantly and be fruitful and multiply, upon the Earth." (Gen. 8:16,17)
-"Japheth! Shem! Ham! The time has come! The great moment for which we have waited so long! Come help me to push this huge door open!"
-"Whew! It won't budge!'
-"Remember, it was the hand of God that has closed it!
***
-"Lord, please help us!"
At last the great door creaked open, as if moved by the same Mighty Hand that had closed it!
And there amidst the blue sky they saw a glorious glowing arch of many colors!
-"I do set my bow in the sky as a sign of my promise to you and every creature, that I will never again send a flood of waters to cover the whole Earth! " It was the first rainbow! (Gen. 9:12-17)