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Monday, October 31, 2016

Easy inexpensive Halloween costumes

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Parentables
If you are looking for costumes that you can make for your residents or their plush stuffed animals, take a look at these 50 DIY costume ideas. With a little modification you and your residents can design these.

Cardboard Box Costumes

1. Rubix Cube. Paint squares and glue them onto a box. Cut holes for your head and arms.
2. Washing machine. Paint a box white and cut holes for the head and arms. Glue an empty laundry detergent bottle to the top.
3. Lego. Paint a box and cut holes for head and arms. Glue paper/plastic cups as the lego linking parts.  
4. Movie Theater Popcorn. Cut head and arm holes in a box. Paint the box white with red stripes. Glue yellow cotton balls or balled-up yellow paper on the top as the popcorn kernels.

Popular Characters

5. Raggedy Ann and Andy. Use red yarn to make wigs, knee socks and a rag-like outfit with blue denim and white overlay.
6. Pacman Ghost. Take an x-large t-shirt and cut the bottom in a triangle pattern. Cut out felt circles in white and blue to glue on eyes.
7. Tetris. Wrap a few smaller boxes in solid colored wrapping paper and tape the outside edges with dark colored electrical tape.
8. Super Mario Brothers. Great for brothers. Don some denim overalls and baseball hats, and dress one brother in a green t-shirt, one in red.
9. Mary Poppins. You'll need a long skirt and button-down shirt, black leggings and black dress shoes, and of course you can't forget the umbrella.
10. Orphan AnnieYou could use paint and rollers on your own hair or don a wig with red, curly tresses. Then you'll need some version of that famous red dress. (Sandy the dog is optional.)
11. Pippi Longstocking. Draw on the freckles and pull up the mismatched knee socks. You'll need a braid on each side of your head, and then thread a single piece of wire through each braid and across the top of your head to get them to stand up.
12. Fancy Nancy. Pile on the dress-up clothes and accessories. You could use paint and rollers on your own hair or don a wig with red, curly tresses.
13. Harry Potter. You'll need a cape, a wand, and round glasses. With makeup you can draw on the lightning bolt scar.
14. Mark Zuckerberg. If your kids are old enough to know the Facebook mogul, they probably also know his signature style: flannel pants, Adidas slip-ons and a robe.

Creative Costumes

15. Carpenter ant. Add extra legs with black tights filled with newspaper and wear a tool belt and hard hat.
16. Hurricane. Wear a sundress with a raincoat. Add dark colored streamers and leaves as debris (especially in your hair). You could also wear a posterboard cut-out of an eyeball on your head for the eye of the storm. 
17. It's Raining Cats and Dogs. Wear rain gear and then have fun decorating your umbrella. Either attach stuffed animals (cats and dogs) or use your own drawing or cut-outs from magazines, reinforced and glued to card stock.
18. Hula girl. Use a paper bag to cut a hula skirt and wear a real or fake flower lei as a necklace and flowers in your hair.
19. Donut. You can build a donut around a hula hoop and carry it around your waist or carry it beside you while you dress as a cup of coffee. If you are willing to cut the bottom out of a hamper, those make great coffee mugs, or use poster boards all around.  
20. Playing card. Use string to connect two poster boards (think salesman out front of a dealership handing out flyers). On one, draw or paint the front of the playing card, and on the other paint the back.
21. Cotton candySecure a paper cone on top of your head with bobby pins, and then cover some old clothes or felt with lots and lots of cotton balls painted pink or blue.
22. Loofah. Ruche an old tutu for part of this costume -- fill it out with extra tulle from the fabric store if your tutu isn't big enough -- and glue the fabric onto some old clothes.
23. Recycle bin or trash can. If you are willing to cut a head hole in the bottom of a hamper you can create a great shape and then attach (glue, tape or staple) trash or recyclable items to the outside.
24. Rainbow. If you have a white t-shirt and spare tights, have fun painting them with rainbow stripes.
25. Grapevine. Dress in green and your body will be the vine. Then attach lots of purple balloons.
26. iPod or iPad. Draw the front and back of an iPod/iPad on two posterboards and string them together at the shoulders.
27. Chocolate chip cookie. Wear a brown outfit and hat. Then cut a circular piece of poster board to make the cookie yourself and affix to your stomach. Brown pieces of felt work well for the chips.
28. Moon. Cut out two poster boards in the shape of either a full or half circle and paint them. Then attach the shapes with string at the shoulder.   
29. Sun. Cut out and paint yellow two circles from poster board. Use the extra board to cut triangles to glue along the edge of the circle. Then attach the shapes with string at the shoulder.

Tried and True Costumes

30. Mad scientistYou will need a white lab coat, lab goggles if you have them, and pretty much any accessories from an at-home science kit you have from around the house.
31. Butterfly or fairy. Throw on the sparkly tights. Many households with little girls have a pair of glittery wings floating around but if you don't it's easy enough to make them with poster board (you can also try these more involved crafting methods).
32. Hippie. Pile on the peace signs and tie-dye. Round tinted sunglasses and a bandana finish out the look.
33. Rock star. Spike up that hair and put on some cool sunglasses. Ripped jeans and rock t-shirts work or even a leather jacket would work. Accessories could include a microphone or guitar.
34. Scuba diver. Put on some swim trunks and a scuba shirt or a Hawaiian shirt with flip flops and goggles. Bonus if you have a scuba mask and snorkel.
35. Detective. A top hat works wonders with an oversized magnifying glass (maybe from an old bug-collecting kit). If you happen to have a pipe and a trench coat, the result will be even more convincing.
36. Witch. If you are like me and slow to throw things away, chances are you will find a pointy witch hat around the house. If not you can make one. Just add your decorated broom stick and your cape and you'll be good to go.
37. Ghost. The good old white sheet works wonders.  You'll need to cut out eyes and mouth to breathe (and eat candy, of course!).
38. Chef. We actually have a few chefs hats around the house from kids' kitchen kits but it's also easy enough to make one with tissue paper.  Don't forget to tie on your favorite apron and dust your face with flour.
39. Goth girl. Slide on the black nail polish, black lipstick, black jeans and black t-shirt with any kind of Gothic jewelry and a sour attitude.

Professional Athlete Costumes

40. Soccer player. Throw on those shin guards and cleats and don a jersey from your favorite team.
41. Hockey player. Pads are optional but impressive. Don't wear your skates trick-or-treating, but you can draw pretend skates on paper to attach over sneakers.
42. Horse rider. My daughter is wearing her riding boots, helmet, jodhpurs and jacket.
43. Football player. Again wearing the pads under your jersey is impressive. Also, don't forget the face paint lines under your eyes.
44. Cheerleader. Depending on the weather, you might need to wear some thermals under your cheerleading shirt and top. Don't forget the pom poms.
45. Ballerina. Dust off that dance recital costume, add leg warmers and tights and remember the tutu.
46. Gymnast. This year, post-Olympics, we're likely to see more of these professional athlete costumes. Be sure to put tights under the leotard so your little one doesn't freeze.
47. Basketball player. Bring along the ball and wear your high tops. Player jerseys and warm-up pants or long basketball shorts finish out this look.
48. Skier or snowboarder. Bundle up in a snowsuit and attach long pieces of cardboard to your shoes as skis or bring along your snowboard as an accessory.
49. Lacrosse player. Try attaching your candy bag to your lacrosse stick. Then wear your favorite jersey and warm-up pants or shorts.
50. Field hockey player. Wear your team's uniform and bring along the stick. You might want to slip on some warm leggings under the field hockey skirt.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Halloween Memories – Mental Boost for Seniors

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Suite101

Katrena Wells

Seniors with Alzheimer's or dementia may recall Halloween traditions from years ago. Find tips for reminiscing that may boost mental health in older adults.

Older adults with dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease may be able to recall memories from long ago even if they do not have an intact short term memory. For example, a senior with dementia may not remember what he had for lunch but may be able to tell you many details about his first car.

Caregivers of people with dementia are often challenged to find meaningful activities for people with cognitive dysfunction. Reminiscing is one way to capitalize on the person’s strength of long-term memory, which can boost their feelings of self-worth, emotional well-being, and may provide insight into a time that may soon be forgotten.

The setting for reminiscing may be formal, as in the case of a group setting in a long term care facility or nursing home, or it may be more informal in a one-on-one conversation. By preparing a few questions in advance, the caregiver may be able to assist the senior to enjoy memories and perhaps even a laugh.

Family Traditions of Halloween in the Past
Years ago, Halloween traditions were quite different from modern commercialized trends of today. Many younger people today may have no idea what cow tipping or a Johnny house is, but an elder may readily tell others all about these and many other Halloween jokes of years ago.


Thursday, October 27, 2016

Reminiscence thought provoking statements

  1. Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

  2. Tell me about your first date

  3. Tell me about the place you were born

  4. Tell me about your brothers and sisters?

  5. Tell me about your pets

  6. Tell me about games you like

  7. Tell me about your children

  8. Tell me about your favorite subjects at school

  9. Tell me about clothes you like to wear or have worn in the past
  10. Tell me about places you worked

  11. How did you meet your spouse? How old were you when you met/got engaged/got married? What was the wedding like?

  12. Tell me about movies or books you liked

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Playing Card Bingo

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is another game needing two decks of cards. You will need several people playing to have the most fun. Pass out four cards(more for those with early dementia, less for those with significant memory challenges) to each person playing. Keep the cards face up Pick a number from the second deck. Whoever has that number, will turn the card face down. The first person to turn all their cards over is the winner. You can also play a community game where there is no winner.


Sunday, October 23, 2016

Dementia song list

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


You can also do an internet search for song titles, purchase a song book, or get song suggestions from your potential audience on another occasion. 


Friday, October 21, 2016

Free Printable Bingo Cards

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

More on bingo

A game of bingo is filled with fun and excitement, and bingo is an entertaining activity for any occasion. Whether you want to play bingo at your next family gathering, party, road trip, or to raise funds for a special cause, this classic game is a crowd pleaser for young and old alike. No other game is quite like bingo, and game playing options are more versatile than you might think. Gone are the days of ordinary numbered cards. Now you'll find cards filled with pictures, letters, numbers, and many other versions of this classic game, and best of all, you don't have to buy bingo cards. The Internet is a virtual treasure chest filled with free printable pages, and you'll find numerous sites offering free printable bingo cards.

Printable Tips and Tricks

Instead of using ordinary paper, spend a little extra for top-quality card stock, and create free printable bingo cards that will stand up to many games. In addition, consider laminating the free printable cards you choose and they'll last indefinitely. Once they're laminated you'll have a set that's as good as or better than those sold in retail or online stores.

Those who plan on traveling with loved ones and searching for games can take advantage of these free printable games especially designed for road trips. The squares are filled with common objects, signs, and vehicles often seen while traveling.

Teach-nology is the place where parents and educators can create free printable bingo cards for kids. These bingo cards are a great teaching tool that makes learning fun for kids of all ages and skill levels. You choose the words you want on the sheets before printing to create a one-of-a-kind set that is truly invaluable. This is a fun way to help with spelling, reading, or any other subject.

Diva Girl provides free printable bingo cards for parties. You'll find free printable sets for bridal showers, baby showers, and for any occasion that calls for fun party games. The website provides complete instructions for each game. Don't play the usual games at your next party. Try these fun bingo games for an unforgettable good time.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Beyond Bingo: Meaningful Activities for Persons with Dementia in Nursing Homes

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities

Annals of Long Term Care

Marianne Smith, PhD, ARNP, BC, Ann Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Linda L. Buettner,
PhD, LRT, CTRS, and Kathleen C. Buckwalter, PhD, RN, FAAN

The importance of redesigning nursing homes to better emulate living in one’s own home has driven regulation reform for decades. The early focus of addressing residents’ rights in the Nursing Home Reform Act1 has slowly expanded to a broader vision of creating “a culture of aging that is life affirming, satisfying, humane and meaningful.”2 Commonly called “culture change,” the movement to improve quality of life among older adults in nursing facilities and other long-term care (LTC) settings has gained considerable momentum. The primary advocacy group, the Pioneer Network, emphasizes values such as knowing the person, putting the person before the task, emphasizing self-determination, promoting growth and development, and using the environment to its best potential.2

Many of these values are exemplified in the revisions of activities regulations set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2006. According to 483.15 (f)(1), “The facility must provide for an ongoing program of activities designed to meet, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment, the interests and the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident.”3 This seemingly simple requirement is strengthened and expanded by definitions that characterize activities as enhancing well-being and promoting physical, cognitive, and emotional health, such as self-esteem, pleasure, comfort, creativity, success, and independence. An additional emphasis is placed on “person-appropriate” activities that are relevant to the specific needs, interests, culture, and background of individual residents, including those with dementia. “One-to-one programming” requires that caregivers provide assistance for those who cannot plan their own activity pursuits, or need special assistance, such as those with dementia. Finally, the program of activities is defined as being a combination of large- and small-group, one-to-one, and self-directed activities that occur throughout the day, every day of the week.

The investigative protocol that accompanies the rule reinforces the need for activities to be an ongoing program that is implemented throughout the day, one that is composed of activities that are compatible with the resident’s known interests, needs, abilities, and preferences, and that is implemented in an environment that promotes success.3 To determine compliance with the rule, residents, activity staff, nurses, nursing assistants, and social workers are all interviewed to determine whether the individual resident’s preferences and choices are assessed, activities are implemented in accordance with needs and goals, resident-specific outcomes are monitored and evaluated, and approaches are revised as appropriate.3

The proverbial “bottom line” in the activity revision is that the large-group programs that dominate activity calendars on a Monday-through-Friday basis are insufficient. The rule simultaneously calls for activities that are person-directed and for collaboration among team members to assure that meaningful activities are continuously available to residents. Language specific to persons with dementia emphasizes the important role that staff may need to play in identifying enjoyable activities that are consistent with the person’s level of current functioning, as well as implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans of care to ensure that needs and preferences are best met.

part 2 of Meaningful Activities for Persons with Dementia in Nursing Homes, soon

Monday, October 17, 2016

Bingo Plus (Bingo Lottery)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

recreationtherapy.com

People who join together in an activity have a common bond that unites them, resulting in better communication, closer friendships, and increased self-confidence." (Hastings, Complete Handbook of Activities and Recreational Programs for Nursing Homes, 1981).
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Bingo, despite what many say, is a great game! Hundreds and thousands of people play bingo each day around the country. But sometimes its over utilized in the nursing home setting. Program coordinators must provide residents opportunities for activities "Beyond Bingo." But, since bingo is so popular, I listed some alternative ways to run your bingo games just to make it interesting. Send in your favorite bingo alternatives.


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Bingo Lottery
submitted by Alice Greene of Grace Ridge Retirement Community

Size of Group: any size

Equipment: Bingo cards and a print sheets of all of the bingo numbers

Objective: to enhance communication, to enhance eye-hand coordination, to initiate communication, to make a decision, to make friends,

Description: At the beginning of the month explain to all residents that will be playing how to play Bingo Lottery. The bingo lottery game is a cover ALL.

Each day two numbers are posted on the activity board at lunch time and dinner time. It will take about the whole month to play

Each day the residents mark their cards and whoever completes a cover all first wins the game. The prize is lunch out anywhere with the Activity Staff. This game has been so fun that the residents enjoys coming out of their rooms just to check the numbers. It gives them something to look forward to each day.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

Bingo and dementia (part 3)


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, Here is some more information

To Deefna and anyone else that is interested, the bingo trivia
a information came from Allpokertable.com

If you do not subscribe to the Activity Director E-Magazine, my next article will all about National Bingo Month

Create your own bingo cards for all occassions

Here is an example of one with a holiday free space

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Bingo and dementia (part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, Here is some.....

Bingo Trivia
Everyone likes to know some little trivia bits about their favorite game. How many possible bingo cards are there really? Where else is bingo played? Do bingo players have pets? The answer to these and many more questions you probably never asked yourself can be found below.
Bingo is p layed by all ages around the world, about 30% of bingo players are under the age of 35.
Approximately 2.5 million of those regular players are female.
An estimated 96% of all bingo players have won some money while playing bingo.
When asked, women report that they are happier playing bingo. About 15% of those women report that bingo is used for socializing and companionship.
Which brings us to this fact: winning is ranked fifth when it comes to reasons for playing bingo. The number one reason… “pure enjoyment”.
4 years after it’s appearance in 1930 the estimated bingo games in churches and recreation centers numbered 10,000.
Reportedly the largest bingo game was held in New York which had approximately 60,000 players. Lowe is to have reported that they had to turn away 10,000 others at the door.
It is reported that after working for Lowe to produce some 6,000 individual bingo cards, University of Columbia mathematics professor Carl Leffler went insane.
The first charity bingo game was held at a church in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
Bingo is the number one fundraising game in the world.
During the depression a form of bingo was played in movie theaters. It was called “Screeno”.
Reportedly Cats are the number one pet of bingo players.
Bingo was Bing Crosby’s nickname as a child.
In Australia bingo was known as Housie when introduced in the early 20th century.
There are approximately 552,446,474,061,129,000,000,000 different bingo card combinations.
Purple is the apparent favorite color for bingo players. This is according to a survey of bingo suppliers.
You can find a bingo game in approximately 90% of the countries in the world.
In 1995 and estimated 88 million dollars was spent on bingo games. That’s 88 million dollars per week.
Like Keno, Slots and blackjackbingo has sucessfully made the transition to being played online by millions of players world wide.
Despite what some people might think, bingo is good for you. Bingo improves concentration, memory and observation skills.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Bingo and dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be



Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, I amstarting a series of articles all about bingo

We will srart with the history of bingo

In the U.S., bingo was originally called "beano". It was a country fair game where a dealer would select numbered discs from a cigar box and players would mark their cards with beans. They yelled "beano" if they won.

The game's history can be traced back to 1530, to an Italian lottery called "Lo Giuoco del Lotto D'Italia," which is still played every Saturday in Italy. From Italy the game was introduced to France in the late 1770s, where it was called "Le Lotto", a game played among wealthy Frenchmen. The Germans also played a version of the game in the 1800s, but they used it as a child's game to help students learn math, spelling and history.

When the game reached North America in 1929, it became known as "beano". It was first played at a carnival near Atlanta, Georgia. New York toy salesman Edwin S. Lowe renamed it "bingo" after he overheard someone accidentally yell "bingo" instead of "beano".

He hired a Columbia University math professor, Carl Leffler, to help him increase the number of combinations in bingo cards. By 1930, Leffler had invented 6,000 different bingo cards. [It is said that Leffler then went insane.]

A Catholic priest from Pennsylvania approached Lowe about using bingo as a means of raising church funds. When bingo started being played in churches it became increasingly popular. By 1934, an estimated 10,000 bingo games were played weekly, and today more than $90 million dollars are spent on bingo each week in North America alone.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Buddy bingo and more

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Buddy Bingo
submitted by Tracy Groene of Enid's Senior Care

Residents that need help playing bingo sit with residents that need no assistance --- they are buddy bingo players. Its great fun for all that play. Both recieve prizes when one of them bingo's.



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Bingo and the Bazaar
submitted by Sue Neitzelt of Rosewood Manor

The residents play bingo and win play money. They then have a bazaar every two weeks and buy things with the money they won at bingo. For prizes, find cheap items at local discount stores. The residents at times donate things they no longer want to the bazaar.


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Card Bingo
submitted by Jan Huegerich of Exira Care Center

Residents are each given 7 cards face up laid out on a table. The leader will then have a new deck and read out the cards as they are dealt. Everyone with that card turns it over and when all of each residents cards are turned over they holler "bingo". Prizes are then given. We have played this with 1 to many residents. You also can alter the number of cards that are dealt out, it really makes no differance. We use it for our seperate activity for our ladies and our men.


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Saturday, October 8, 2016

Activities that anyone can do with a resident

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right
Saturday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions

Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right
Saturday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions

Friday, October 7, 2016

Still in the game: cognitively impaired seniors can benefit greatly from mind exercises

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers read this article from
McKnights Long Term Care News
Julie Williamson

As more studies validate the importance of brain fitness programs for keeping seniors' minds sharp, and as more long-term care operators incorporate them into resident activities, it appears there are still some major obstacles to overcome—namely, the lack of solutions aimed at cognitively impaired seniors.

It's a shortcoming that seems both logical and perplexing. On one hand, it's understandable that brain fitness solutions would be geared toward those who are still mentally sharp. The goal is preventing dementia or, at least, delaying its onset. On the other hand, one could reasonably argue that residents already experiencing cognitive decline also could benefit from brain fitness strategies—even if they can't fully reverse the existing damage.

While experts generally agree that every senior, regardless of where he or she falls on the cognitive impairment spectrum, would benefit from brain fitness solutions, a number of obstacles have inhibited the widespread development of tools for those with dementia.

“Trials and testing with cognitively compromised populations is harder in terms of obtaining Institutional Review Board approvals for studies and trials, obtaining informed consent from participants, training the individuals to use the brain fitness, and getting them to comply with the fitness program,” explains Majd Alwan, Ph.D., director of the Center for Aging Services Technologies, which is affiliated with the AAHSA trade group.

The belief that Alzheimer's and dementia are irreversible presents another barrier to the development of mental exercises for the cognitively impaired.

Time, control needed

As Alwan points out, efforts to prove that an intervention is effective in slowing down the progression of dementia (let alone reversing it) require years of follow-up and active control. Beyond that, there are challenges in designing brain fitness technologies for the dementia/Alzheimer's resident that are fun, familiar (such as those that mimic appliances and other recognizable devices), easy to use and engaging.

“It is too early to have more specific evidence-based guidelines on what program to use,” says Alvaro Fernandez, CEO and co-founder of SharpBrains, a provider of senior-focused online brain teasers and interactive games.

In the absence of such data, SharpBrains encourages communities to conduct their own pilot studies to measure pre- and post-cognitive function to determine which practices may be most appropriate in their environments.
Those that do could very well find their efforts well rewarded. In fact, there's strong evidence that through creative program development and a community-wide commitment to brain fitness, virtually every resident can experience improved cognitive function and quality of life.

“Communities usually start offering programs to their high-functioning [residents] first. These individuals tend to have the ability and motivation to complete the often demanding programs and are not intimidated by computers,” Fernandez notes. “This may be a good place to start, but it is essential to offer appropriate cognitive stimulation, technology-based or not, at each stage of cognitive impairment.”

Breaking down barriers

One respected brain fitness expert has witnessed firsthand how residents.....read the whole story

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Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Wreath of leaves- an easy to do fall craft for those with dementia

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Wreath of leaves- an easy to do fall craft for those with dementia

Supplies needed:

A plain white paper plate
Construction paper (orange, red, yellow, brown, and other earth tones)
Crayons or markers
Scissors
Glue or a glue stick

Cut a half circle out of the center of a plain paper plate. This will hold the leaves.

Cut out a lot of leaves from construction paper. Draw the leaf veins if you wish. If you'd like, use leaves gathered from outdoors.

Leaf templates and other fall ideas

Glue the leaves all around the rim of the paper plate.

For more, come back soon

Monday, October 3, 2016

Using Humor for those with Alzheimer's disease

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Chicago Tribune
by Lisa Pevtow

To an Alzheimer's patient, there's nothing funny about forgetting to turn off the oven, losing a telephone number or misplacing books from the library. But turning those mishaps into punch lines might turn out to be therapeutic.

The idea that improvisational comedy might help those in the early to middle stages of Alzheimer's cope with their disease is being tested by the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and Chicago's Lookingglass Theatre Company

Not having to memorize lines or remember a story narrative might spur confidence by freeing patients from worry over lost words or thoughts, and actually stimulate their brain chemistry to forge new protections against further onslaught of the disease, researchers say.

A possible role for creative arts in improving life for those with memory loss is being studied nationwide. In the region, besides Northwestern's Memory Ensemble project, which will continue in the fall, Elmhurst College researchers are looking at whether theater classes have a measurable effect on seniors' brains, and in Northfield, a day services facility is encouraging spontaneous storytelling.

At a recent improv session, skits progressed unexpectedly: A pair of lovers morphed into a mushroom hunting expedition; an ice skating adventure became a camping trip.

"I don't know what I'm doing," one of the performers confided, "but it's freeing."

Susan Walsh-Haggerty, 63, of Oak Lawn, appreciated the experience.

"I've learned that I am imaginative, playful and creative," said Walsh-Haggerty, pausing to search for the right word. "I can be funny."

Mary Beth Roth, whose husband, Wolfgang Roth, 80, participated, said he couldn't tell her 10 minutes later what he'd done, but, "Every day after class, there was a lightness in his spirit. There was a buoyancy about him, a more positive attitude."

Wolfgang Roth, a former dean of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston and a retired Hebrew scripture scholar, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2007. His wife said the class "opened an avenue of new experience for him." She recalled that during a skit about a student and teacher, her husband accidentally used the wrong word, but everyone laughed, because it was funny, and the skit just went in another direction.

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Sayings for inside Christmas cards

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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I am posting this to go along with an article that will on Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine



A Christmas candle is a lovely thing; It makes no noise at all, But softly gives itself away; While quite unselfish, it grows small. -


And the angel said unto them, "Fear not! For, behold, I bring you tidings of great joy, Which shall be to all people. "For unto you is born this day in the city of David A Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you: Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, Lying in a manger. -
Are you willing to believe that love is the strongest thing in the world - stronger than hate, stronger than evil, stronger than death - and that the blessed life which began in Bethlehem nineteen hundred years ago is the image and brightness of the Eternal Love? Then you can keep Christmas. -

At Christmas play and make good cheer, 
For Christmas comes but once a year -

Best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year.

Bless us Lord, this Christmas, with quietness of mind; 
Teach us to be patient and always to be kind. –

Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful. –

Greetings of the Season and Best Wishes for the New Year

Holiday Greetings and Best Wishes for a New Year of Happiness in a world of peace.

Holiday Greetings!. . . celebrate each day.

I wish we could put up some of the Christmas spirit in jars and open a jar of it every month. -

May Peace be your gift at Christmas and your blessing all year through! 
May peace, love and prosperity follow you always.

May the Blessings of Christmas be with you today and always.

May the Holiday Season bring only happiness and joy to you.