"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

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Thursday, October 27, 2016

Reminiscence thought provoking statements

  1. Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

  2. Tell me about your first date

  3. Tell me about the place you were born

  4. Tell me about your brothers and sisters?

  5. Tell me about your pets

  6. Tell me about games you like

  7. Tell me about your children

  8. Tell me about your favorite subjects at school

  9. Tell me about clothes you like to wear or have worn in the past
  10. Tell me about places you worked

  11. How did you meet your spouse? How old were you when you met/got engaged/got married? What was the wedding like?

  12. Tell me about movies or books you liked

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Playing Card Bingo

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is another game needing two decks of cards. You will need several people playing to have the most fun. Pass out four cards(more for those with early dementia, less for those with significant memory challenges) to each person playing. Keep the cards face up Pick a number from the second deck. Whoever has that number, will turn the card face down. The first person to turn all their cards over is the winner. You can also play a community game where there is no winner.


Sunday, October 23, 2016

Dementia song list

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


You can also do an internet search for song titles, purchase a song book, or get song suggestions from your potential audience on another occasion. 


Friday, October 21, 2016

Free Printable Bingo Cards

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

More on bingo

A game of bingo is filled with fun and excitement, and bingo is an entertaining activity for any occasion. Whether you want to play bingo at your next family gathering, party, road trip, or to raise funds for a special cause, this classic game is a crowd pleaser for young and old alike. No other game is quite like bingo, and game playing options are more versatile than you might think. Gone are the days of ordinary numbered cards. Now you'll find cards filled with pictures, letters, numbers, and many other versions of this classic game, and best of all, you don't have to buy bingo cards. The Internet is a virtual treasure chest filled with free printable pages, and you'll find numerous sites offering free printable bingo cards.

Printable Tips and Tricks

Instead of using ordinary paper, spend a little extra for top-quality card stock, and create free printable bingo cards that will stand up to many games. In addition, consider laminating the free printable cards you choose and they'll last indefinitely. Once they're laminated you'll have a set that's as good as or better than those sold in retail or online stores.

Those who plan on traveling with loved ones and searching for games can take advantage of these free printable games especially designed for road trips. The squares are filled with common objects, signs, and vehicles often seen while traveling.

Teach-nology is the place where parents and educators can create free printable bingo cards for kids. These bingo cards are a great teaching tool that makes learning fun for kids of all ages and skill levels. You choose the words you want on the sheets before printing to create a one-of-a-kind set that is truly invaluable. This is a fun way to help with spelling, reading, or any other subject.

Diva Girl provides free printable bingo cards for parties. You'll find free printable sets for bridal showers, baby showers, and for any occasion that calls for fun party games. The website provides complete instructions for each game. Don't play the usual games at your next party. Try these fun bingo games for an unforgettable good time.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Beyond Bingo: Meaningful Activities for Persons with Dementia in Nursing Homes

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities

Annals of Long Term Care

Marianne Smith, PhD, ARNP, BC, Ann Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, Linda L. Buettner,
PhD, LRT, CTRS, and Kathleen C. Buckwalter, PhD, RN, FAAN

The importance of redesigning nursing homes to better emulate living in one’s own home has driven regulation reform for decades. The early focus of addressing residents’ rights in the Nursing Home Reform Act1 has slowly expanded to a broader vision of creating “a culture of aging that is life affirming, satisfying, humane and meaningful.”2 Commonly called “culture change,” the movement to improve quality of life among older adults in nursing facilities and other long-term care (LTC) settings has gained considerable momentum. The primary advocacy group, the Pioneer Network, emphasizes values such as knowing the person, putting the person before the task, emphasizing self-determination, promoting growth and development, and using the environment to its best potential.2

Many of these values are exemplified in the revisions of activities regulations set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2006. According to 483.15 (f)(1), “The facility must provide for an ongoing program of activities designed to meet, in accordance with the comprehensive assessment, the interests and the physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident.”3 This seemingly simple requirement is strengthened and expanded by definitions that characterize activities as enhancing well-being and promoting physical, cognitive, and emotional health, such as self-esteem, pleasure, comfort, creativity, success, and independence. An additional emphasis is placed on “person-appropriate” activities that are relevant to the specific needs, interests, culture, and background of individual residents, including those with dementia. “One-to-one programming” requires that caregivers provide assistance for those who cannot plan their own activity pursuits, or need special assistance, such as those with dementia. Finally, the program of activities is defined as being a combination of large- and small-group, one-to-one, and self-directed activities that occur throughout the day, every day of the week.

The investigative protocol that accompanies the rule reinforces the need for activities to be an ongoing program that is implemented throughout the day, one that is composed of activities that are compatible with the resident’s known interests, needs, abilities, and preferences, and that is implemented in an environment that promotes success.3 To determine compliance with the rule, residents, activity staff, nurses, nursing assistants, and social workers are all interviewed to determine whether the individual resident’s preferences and choices are assessed, activities are implemented in accordance with needs and goals, resident-specific outcomes are monitored and evaluated, and approaches are revised as appropriate.3

The proverbial “bottom line” in the activity revision is that the large-group programs that dominate activity calendars on a Monday-through-Friday basis are insufficient. The rule simultaneously calls for activities that are person-directed and for collaboration among team members to assure that meaningful activities are continuously available to residents. Language specific to persons with dementia emphasizes the important role that staff may need to play in identifying enjoyable activities that are consistent with the person’s level of current functioning, as well as implementing, monitoring, evaluating, and revising plans of care to ensure that needs and preferences are best met.

part 2 of Meaningful Activities for Persons with Dementia in Nursing Homes, soon

Monday, October 17, 2016

Bingo Plus (Bingo Lottery)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

recreationtherapy.com

People who join together in an activity have a common bond that unites them, resulting in better communication, closer friendships, and increased self-confidence." (Hastings, Complete Handbook of Activities and Recreational Programs for Nursing Homes, 1981).
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Bingo, despite what many say, is a great game! Hundreds and thousands of people play bingo each day around the country. But sometimes its over utilized in the nursing home setting. Program coordinators must provide residents opportunities for activities "Beyond Bingo." But, since bingo is so popular, I listed some alternative ways to run your bingo games just to make it interesting. Send in your favorite bingo alternatives.


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Bingo Lottery
submitted by Alice Greene of Grace Ridge Retirement Community

Size of Group: any size

Equipment: Bingo cards and a print sheets of all of the bingo numbers

Objective: to enhance communication, to enhance eye-hand coordination, to initiate communication, to make a decision, to make friends,

Description: At the beginning of the month explain to all residents that will be playing how to play Bingo Lottery. The bingo lottery game is a cover ALL.

Each day two numbers are posted on the activity board at lunch time and dinner time. It will take about the whole month to play

Each day the residents mark their cards and whoever completes a cover all first wins the game. The prize is lunch out anywhere with the Activity Staff. This game has been so fun that the residents enjoys coming out of their rooms just to check the numbers. It gives them something to look forward to each day.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

Bingo and dementia (part 3)


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, Here is some more information

To Deefna and anyone else that is interested, the bingo trivia
a information came from Allpokertable.com

If you do not subscribe to the Activity Director E-Magazine, my next article will all about National Bingo Month

Create your own bingo cards for all occassions

Here is an example of one with a holiday free space

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Bingo and dementia (part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, Here is some.....

Bingo Trivia
Everyone likes to know some little trivia bits about their favorite game. How many possible bingo cards are there really? Where else is bingo played? Do bingo players have pets? The answer to these and many more questions you probably never asked yourself can be found below.
Bingo is p layed by all ages around the world, about 30% of bingo players are under the age of 35.
Approximately 2.5 million of those regular players are female.
An estimated 96% of all bingo players have won some money while playing bingo.
When asked, women report that they are happier playing bingo. About 15% of those women report that bingo is used for socializing and companionship.
Which brings us to this fact: winning is ranked fifth when it comes to reasons for playing bingo. The number one reason… “pure enjoyment”.
4 years after it’s appearance in 1930 the estimated bingo games in churches and recreation centers numbered 10,000.
Reportedly the largest bingo game was held in New York which had approximately 60,000 players. Lowe is to have reported that they had to turn away 10,000 others at the door.
It is reported that after working for Lowe to produce some 6,000 individual bingo cards, University of Columbia mathematics professor Carl Leffler went insane.
The first charity bingo game was held at a church in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
Bingo is the number one fundraising game in the world.
During the depression a form of bingo was played in movie theaters. It was called “Screeno”.
Reportedly Cats are the number one pet of bingo players.
Bingo was Bing Crosby’s nickname as a child.
In Australia bingo was known as Housie when introduced in the early 20th century.
There are approximately 552,446,474,061,129,000,000,000 different bingo card combinations.
Purple is the apparent favorite color for bingo players. This is according to a survey of bingo suppliers.
You can find a bingo game in approximately 90% of the countries in the world.
In 1995 and estimated 88 million dollars was spent on bingo games. That’s 88 million dollars per week.
Like Keno, Slots and blackjackbingo has sucessfully made the transition to being played online by millions of players world wide.
Despite what some people might think, bingo is good for you. Bingo improves concentration, memory and observation skills.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Bingo and dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be



Many long term care residents including those with mild to moderate dementia enjoy bingo. Soon it will be National Bingo Month with that in mind, I amstarting a series of articles all about bingo

We will srart with the history of bingo

In the U.S., bingo was originally called "beano". It was a country fair game where a dealer would select numbered discs from a cigar box and players would mark their cards with beans. They yelled "beano" if they won.

The game's history can be traced back to 1530, to an Italian lottery called "Lo Giuoco del Lotto D'Italia," which is still played every Saturday in Italy. From Italy the game was introduced to France in the late 1770s, where it was called "Le Lotto", a game played among wealthy Frenchmen. The Germans also played a version of the game in the 1800s, but they used it as a child's game to help students learn math, spelling and history.

When the game reached North America in 1929, it became known as "beano". It was first played at a carnival near Atlanta, Georgia. New York toy salesman Edwin S. Lowe renamed it "bingo" after he overheard someone accidentally yell "bingo" instead of "beano".

He hired a Columbia University math professor, Carl Leffler, to help him increase the number of combinations in bingo cards. By 1930, Leffler had invented 6,000 different bingo cards. [It is said that Leffler then went insane.]

A Catholic priest from Pennsylvania approached Lowe about using bingo as a means of raising church funds. When bingo started being played in churches it became increasingly popular. By 1934, an estimated 10,000 bingo games were played weekly, and today more than $90 million dollars are spent on bingo each week in North America alone.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Buddy bingo and more

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Buddy Bingo
submitted by Tracy Groene of Enid's Senior Care

Residents that need help playing bingo sit with residents that need no assistance --- they are buddy bingo players. Its great fun for all that play. Both recieve prizes when one of them bingo's.



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Bingo and the Bazaar
submitted by Sue Neitzelt of Rosewood Manor

The residents play bingo and win play money. They then have a bazaar every two weeks and buy things with the money they won at bingo. For prizes, find cheap items at local discount stores. The residents at times donate things they no longer want to the bazaar.


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Card Bingo
submitted by Jan Huegerich of Exira Care Center

Residents are each given 7 cards face up laid out on a table. The leader will then have a new deck and read out the cards as they are dealt. Everyone with that card turns it over and when all of each residents cards are turned over they holler "bingo". Prizes are then given. We have played this with 1 to many residents. You also can alter the number of cards that are dealt out, it really makes no differance. We use it for our seperate activity for our ladies and our men.


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Saturday, October 8, 2016

Activities that anyone can do with a resident

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right
Saturday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions

Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right
Saturday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions