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Thursday, December 26, 2013

A picture is worth a thousand words


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Engaging in creative endeavors is vital for long term care residents. It is an important way to keep them thinking. It keeps their minds working and raises self esteem.
 
One such activity that easily encourages creativity, I call, A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
 
This is an easy activity to do as long as you have the right picture for participants to describe and the right frame of mind to facilitate the discussion of the picture. As with any activity you need to adapt and modify it so that it is success oriented and failure free.
 
Use a picture that is colorful with large, easy to describe items, that interests your audience.
 
Baby photographs are one type of picture that seems to have universal appeal for nursing home residents especially those with dementia.
 
You act as the facilitator in some cases. Be ready to help the participants with discussion questions. Make sure you have pencil and paper handy. You may want to give some higher functioning residents some paper and magic markers so they can jot down some “notes” for you. Of course, you will be taking down most of the information.
 
Before you show the person(s) the picture, tell them you are going to help them write a story about a picture because you know they are smart and have good ideas.
 
Now you are ready to show the picture(s) to the members of the group. As you ask the questions, make sure you show the picture to the participant(s) that you are directing the questions to. You or someone in the group can be the eyes for visually impaired participants. However, you will see that the discussion may take on a life of its own where the picture may not even be needed. Think of the picture as a story starter.
You might begin with the question, “Do you like this picture?”
 
If the majority of the audience says, “No”, use a different one. It is important to have at least two pictures available in case this happens.
 
Now that you have a picture most group members like, you want to ask a series of questions about it.
 
As you ask the questions about the picture, note any remarkable responses. That is, statements about the picture that will make the story interesting. Remember to assist members of the audience with answers to questions by providing the help they may need.
 
For example, if they are having trouble deciding what season is shown in the picture, talk about the seasons of the year, by asking them to name the seasons. If they are having trouble, give them a choice of two. If there is still some confusion, say that the baby and the lady are wearing swimsuits. Ask about the season that swimsuits are worn in etc.
 
Understand that you can ask any question that you want to, which will help facilitate the discussion.
 
You could print out a list of these or similar questions to help you in the note taking process
 
You may have to give two choices for an answer to a question if you do not get any response from an open ended question. An example to the question, “How is he feeling”, might be: “Is he happy or sad?” If you still don’t get a response, then say, “I think he is happy because he is smiling. Do you agree (say the participant’s name)?” Then you might extend the thought by asking about the baby’s face. There is a good chance a participant may say that the baby is smiling. You could ask what kind of smile he has etc... You can include these facts in the story when you write it.
 
Emphasize that there are really no right or wrong answers to any of the questions. Tell them that it is just what they think the answer is. Again stress that you know how smart and creative everyone is.
 
Thus this is a good creative outlet for long term care residents even if they have limitations.
 
You may want to have the group members suggest an opening line to the story such as: “Once upon a time”, “One sunny day”, “A few days ago” or whatever works.
After you have compiled all the answers to the questions, write a simple story about the picture using all or some of the answers given.
 
Then, later on, show the picture and read the story perhaps noting some great remarks of those that participated. Of course, be complimentary. You may want to post the story or create a short story book. Sometimes I share ideas that were expressed in this group to family members.
 
 
 
You probably will not include as many details.
 
Adorable Photographs of Our Baby, flash cards, are ideal for this activity

As with any activity, a sure way to guarantee success is for you or the group leader to be animated and excited about doing the activity. Praising the participants for their efforts is key to a positive outcome as well.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Foods that keep you happy

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best 
caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Buzzle
 
10 Foods that Keep You Happy

Chocolate
One of my favorite anti-stress foods. I think everyone in this world loves chocolates. People are just looking for excuses to have a bite. Chocolates contain anadamine, a chemical that makes us cheerful. Scientists believe that other components in chocolate help anadamine to stay longer in the brain. The sugar content boosts our levels of glucose and endorphins (another hormone which makes us happy). Don't have chocolate in excess though.

Salmon
Salmon fish is a sea of omega-3 essential fatty acids which are regarded as one of the top antidepressants in the world. No one is quite sure how it works. But according to a recent research it has been found out that, people who consume omega-3 fatty acids daily, are always in a good mood than others. Other fish which have similar effects like salmon are mackerel, eel, and tuna. All of these are also known to fight symptoms of depression, persistent pessimism and erectile dysfunction.

Bananas
I have always heard the phrase the "mighty banana" from my mother and trust me, it is. Banana has tryptophan, a protein when consumed is converted into serotonin by the body. Most of us know that serotonin is directly associated with cheerfulness. Bananas also contains carbohydrates and high levels of potassium which are good for our body. Health experts believe that banana is one of the most healthiest foods. So, include a banana in your daily diet.

Rice, Bread, Noodles or Pasta
Carbohydrates, a favorite with many. Following all these low carb diets will make you thin, but trust me they are going to pull the life out of you. Eating carbohydrates increases serotonin levels in our body which has a calming effect. Choose healthier carbohydrates like brown rice, noodles, wheat bread and vegetables. These are some of the few healthy foods that fill you up.

Bake Potato
Heat one of these high energy potatoes and it will improve your concentration to a high extent. Have baked potato with salsa and low sodium salt. This is a great snack before going for a heavy workout. It gives you the energy that lasts.

Beans and Soybeans
Beans are filled with soluble fiber, folic acid and omega-3 fats, these three ingredients work best to make your mood cheerful. Beans are also an excellent source of iron and calcium which increases the number of blood cells in the body. Soy products contain genistein which helps in preventing prostate and breast cancer. You can also have soy milk and taho, they are also excellent sources of fiber which keep you healthy and happy.

Fresh Peas
Yes fresh green peas are also one of the healthy foods that make you happy. Peas contain high amounts of folate, a nutrient which helps body to produce serotonin. You can buy fresh frozen peas for your food, but avoid the canned ones as they have a minimal quantity of nutrients left. Peas are very easily included in salads and various other gravies.

Milk or Skim Milk
Milk and milk products are rich in tryptophan. Tryptophan is an amino acid which is needed by our brain to develop serotonin which helps us stay calm and cheerful. Milk also contains antioxidants, vitamin D and vitamin B12 that helps us brain to fight stress and old age. You can also go for skimmed milk, it makes you happy and is rich in calcium.

Spinach
It's Popeye's favorite food. So, if you want to be strong and powerful like Popeye, have spinach. It is rich in folic acid which helps body to make serotonin which gives your body a feel good factor. Most kids don't like it but it's very necessary that spinach becomes a part of their diet. Eat a cup of cooked spinach to help you feel strong and full of positivity to face the world.

Blueberries
Blueberries are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C, which are also well-known stress busters. Antioxidants help eliminate free radicals (toxins) which keep moving in our body. These free radicals cause us to age faster and harm our internal organs. Blueberries are packed with fiber which aids in good digestion. Some scientists also believe that blueberries and strawberries also prevent cancer.

So, these were some of the healthy foods that make you happy. If you really want to find healthy foods that keep you happy, then you must stop focusing on junk food and eat such healthy foods that enlighten your mind and make your day bright. Believe me, the above mentioned foods can cheer you up. Just add them to your daily diet and you will see the effects in a short span of time

Friday, November 8, 2013

Are you from a happy state


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

What is this all about?, you ask.Be sure to read the January 2014 edition of Activity Director Today

In December 2005, we requested proclamations for the 5th Annual Hunt for Happiness Week, Jan. 15 – 21, 2006, from 46 governors. We did not have Happy Proclamation Coordinators in Arkansas, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Vermont.
If you didn’t like your governor’s response, feel free to tell them. And, if you are happy with your governor’s response, please tell them! (That’s what the Society is all about). If we don’t get a proclamation this year, we’ll ask again next year.
“Happy Governors (proclamation issued)Connecticut Gov. M. Jodi Rell  (See the proclamation)
Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius
Maine Gov. John Baldacci
Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman   (See a picture)
New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson
Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski   (Text of proclamation)
Texas Gov. Rick Perry
Unhappy Governors (no proclamation issued)Alaska Gov. Frank Murkowski
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush
Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty
Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer
North Carolina Gov. Mike Easley
Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen
No Response YetAlabama Gov. Bob Riley
Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger
Colorado Gov. Bill Owens
Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner
Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue
Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle
Idaho Gov. Dirk Kempthorne
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels
Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack
Kentucky Gov. Ernie Fletcher
Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco
Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich Jr.
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt RoomeyMississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (601) 359-3150Nevada Gov. Kenny GuinnNew Hampshire Gov. John LynchNew Jersey Gov. Richard J. CodeyNew York Gov. George E. Pataki
North Dakota Gov. John Hoeven
Ohio Gov. Bob Taft
Pennsylvania Gov. Edward Rendell
Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, Jr.
Virginia Gov. Mark Warner(804) 786-2211
Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire
West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III
Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle
Wyoming Gov. Dave Freudenthal

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Other Mitten Stories and Ideas



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

The Old Man's Mitten
 
The old man’s mitten   A story from Latvia Translated in English by P─ôrses pamatskola, Koknese ,Latvia   
 
 It was cold winter. An old man wanted to go to the forest to get wood. Suddenly the old man wanted to light his pipe. Whilst he was searching for tobacco and a cigarette-lighter, he lost one mitten. A fly that was running away from the frost, noticed the mitten and ran inside it. She was happy and started to dance.   A mouse that was running from the frost, ran to the mitten and asked: “ Who dances in the mitten ? “I - the queen of the flies. But who are you?” “I am a mouse-pepper. Allow me to warm myself.” “Crawl in and get warm!” The mouse crawled in the mitten. Both the mouse and the fly started to dance. A hare that was running away from the frost, noticed the mitten, ran to it and asked. “Who dances in the mitten?” “I - the queen of the flies and the mouse-pepper. But who are you?” “ I am a hare – white tail. Allow me to warm myself.” “OK, crawl in and get warm!” The hare crawled in the glove and all the three began to dance.
A wolf that was running from the frost ran to the mitten and asked: “Who dances in the mitten?” “I - the queen of the flies, the mouse-pepper and the hare – white tail. But who are you?” “I am a wolf – snappy ear. Allow me to warm myself.’’ “OK, crawl in and get warm!” The wolf crawled in the mitten and all the four begin to dance. A bear that was running from the frost, ran to the mitten and asked: “Who dances in the mitten?” “I - the queen of the flies, the mouse-pepper, and the hare – white tail and the wolf – snappy ear. But who are you?” “I am the big shaggy-haired bear. Allow me to warm myself.” “OK, crawl in and get warm!” The bear crawled in the mitten and all the five begin to dance. Suddenly a cock arrived and sang “Kikerigu, let’s run!” The dancers got scared and everybody began to force their way out of the mitten. The fly left for the king’s palace, the mouse to the cellar of potatoes, the hare – to the oats, the wolf – to the bushes, the bear – to the wood. While they were running, they tore the old man’s mitten. And so to this day the old man walks with one mitten.
 
A Mitten Song
 
 
The Mitten in the Snow Song
Tune: The Farmer in the Dell
This is the order of the animals in Jan Brett's version of the book:
A mole is the first to discover the mitten and crawls inside, followed by
a snowshoe rabbit, a hedgehog, an owl, a badger, a fox, a bear and, finally a mouse.
The mouse causes the bear to sneeze; the mitten and all its occupants go flying.


The mitten in the snow
The mitten in the snow
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A mole squeezes in
A mole squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A rabbit squeezes in
A rabbit squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A hedgehog squeezes in
A hedgehog squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


An owl squeezes in
An owl squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A badger squeezes in
A badger squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A fox squeezes in
A fox squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A bear squeezes in
A bear squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.


A mouse squeezes in
A mouse squeezes in
Help us please so we won't freeze!
The mitten in the snow.

"A-choo"
The bear says, "A-choo!"
The bear says, "A-choo!"
All the animals fly out of
The mitten in the snow!
 
 
 
 

Sunday, August 11, 2013

Another fishing game for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Materials

Construction paper
Scissors
Pen, crayon, or marker
box, pot, or other container to be the fishing pond

Directions

Cut fish shapes out of colored construction paper.
On each fish write a different instruction: "Find something red"; "Count to ten"; "Touch your face"; "Sing a song"; "Shake your neighbor's hand"and so on.

Place the fish in a box or container and let each participant pick one fish at a time.

You or he read the instruction and have him perform it. You may want to do some of the things with the whole group depending on the skill level of the participants and the commands you have written.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Name That Tune for those with dementia



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Go to Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine

or Activity Director Today e magazine

Sarah’s Favorite Songs
You can also do an internet search for song titles, purchase a song book, or get song suggestions from your potential audience on another occasion. 

Friday, May 31, 2013

Celebrate Judy Garland's birthday with those who have dementia


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Barbara Jacobs suggests this formula for success
A two-part music session.

In the first part, provide a positive musical experience by beginning with a warm-up activity through reminiscing. I begin by playing CDs of favorite recording artists such as Judy Garland and Nat King Cole. When in a group setting, such as one led by an Activity Director or other care professional in a care facility, have a brief discussion of the artist’s background. (Most CD covers will give you a short biography and it is easy to find such information on the Internet). This will usually generate discussion and get people in the mood to sing.

The second part of the class consists of an old fashioned sing-along

I feel you can hand out song sheets. Sometimes I find them to be a hiderance because some dementia folks cannot follow them. Most residents(clients) know most of the words to a song anyway

Next time some good sing a long videos

Monday, May 13, 2013

How did your Mother's day go?

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two



Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here are some pictures from our Mother'd Day event


We enjoy good food and conversation while the piano player plays music we love

We have a resident choral group. They always perform on Mother's Day at a tea for residents and their families

WHAT A GREAT START TO NATIONAL NURSING HOME WEEK!

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Are you celebrating National Nurses Week


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





Fur the sake of teamwork in a long term care setting, celebrate National Nurses Week 2013

Delivering Quality and Innovation in Patient Care National Nurses Week is celebrated annually from May 6, also known as National Nurses Day, through May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. Visit the NNW History page, part of the NNW Media Kit.

Start Date: 5/6/2013 12:00:00 AM
End Date: 5/12/2013 12:00:00 AM
Location: May 6-12
Event URL:
Learn More... Official online NNW Catalog
Often described as an art and a science, nursing is a profession that embraces dedicated people with varied interests, strengths and passions because of the many opportunities the profession offers. As nurses, we work in emergency rooms, school based clinics, and homeless shelters, to name a few. We have many roles – from staff nurse to educator to nurse practitioner and nurse researcher – and serve all of them with passion for the profession and with a strong commitment to patient safety.


Background
National Nurses Week is celebrated annually from May 6, also known as National Nurses Day, through May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing. Visit the NNW


History page, part of the NNW Media Kit. The National Nurses Week logo is developed by the American Nurses Association (ANA) to help celebrate nurses and all that they do. ANA does trademark this logo but allows facilities to use it in their own celebrations.

Sunday, April 7, 2013

Patriotic Pleasures: A Meaningful Activity for Those with Memory Impairments

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two






Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

There are many patriotic holidays throughout the year. This activity is appropriate for those times, as well as for any time you or they just feel or want to feel patriotic.

You should have a flag or a picture of a flag handy. You can start this activity by reciting the "Pledge of Allegiance." Then you can sing one or two patriotic songs, such as "My Country Tis of Thee'' or "America the Beautiful, Beautiful," with the person or people with dementia.

Now you can have a discussion about the flag. Instead of asking questions, make statements that the dementia participants can complete. Here are some examples.

The colors on the flag are_____,______ and____.

The flag today has_____ stars.

The color of the stars is_____.

The flag has_____stripes.

The colors of the stripes are_____ and______.

There are six____stripes.

There are seven____stripes.

The stripes represent the_____original colonies.

The first flag had____ stars.

I am sure you can think of many more statements. In fact, you can have your participants think of statements about the flag. Then sing the song, "You're a Grand Old Flag."

Now talk about the letters in the word "flag." Mention each letter one at a time. Say, "Lets think of words that start with each letter. If the participant is higher functioning, then have them say a word that starts with a particular letter that is a symbol or a feeling of the flag or patriotism.

For example:

Here are some words that start with f, flag, friendship, fun, father, future, freedom. Here are some words that start with l, love, little, land, live, light, leader. Here are some words that start with a, America, always, anthem. Here are some words that start with g, grand, great, general, generosity.

 

If people are having trouble thinking of words, give them hints or broaden the categories. You can think of people’s names that start with each letter in the word flag, for example. Next sing another patriotic song like, “The Star Spangled Banner”.

 

Now have a discussion about the armed forces. Talk about the five branches of the armed forces. See who in your audience was in the army, navy, air force, marines, or coast guards. You can sing the theme songs from the different branches of the service during this part of the discussion. You can talk about the different ranks people can hold in each of the branches, such as, private, sergeant, captain, or general. See if any one can name well remembered persons in the service such as General Patton, General Eisenhower, or General MacArthur, for example. Of course, name people in the group who were in the armed forces because, after all, they are famous in your mind. Make sure to thank these people for the service to the country that they did as well.

                                                

Now sing another patriotic song like “God Bless America”. If time permits, have a discussion about various states that people have visited. You can also have a discussion about the thirteen original colonies. I find that if people are trying to remember the names of states, you can mention the names of cities in the states as hints.

 

End the activity with another patriotic song like Yankee Doodle Dandy”.  A mixture of discussion alternated with song works best when trying to keep the interest of everyone involved.

Friday, April 5, 2013

A great addition to your activity calendar

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Every afternoon at 4pm, I have a program called “Live&Learn”.

A daily “Live&Learn” program is a nice addition to any activity calendar. It gives you and the residents a chance to either discuss daily events, news, and trivia or special days.

As I said before, distributing special cards each week when you pass out the weekly calendar gives residents who do not come to group activities a way to get involved.

If you do not pass out weekly calendars, you can distribute the cards every Friday, at an activity or during 1:1 visits.

You can then use the cards during the 1:1 visits that day or another day.

At the monthly birthday party, I pick the winners from those who have completed and turned in the cards for that month. I give out a small prize or certificate to all those who participate. This adds a nice touch to the monthly birthday party. It gives you a way to honor other people besides those who have a birthday that month.  

 



 

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Alzheimer's Therapeutic Activities

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Alzorginfo.com

Alzheimer's Activities

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

•There are many different stages that a person with Alzheimer's and dementia will go through, therefore activities for individuals in the early or middle stage of the disease will differ from the end stages of Alzheimer's.

•When planning activities for the person with Alzheimer's. disease, creating routine and structure is extremely important.


•In order to improve quality of life at each stage of the disease it is important to focus on the patients strengths and abilities. It is important to look at what the patient can do, instead of what they cannot do. Planning activities is a process of trial and error involving continual exploration, experimentation and adjustment.


•Activities can be passive or active. Some patients may participate in an activity, while others may only observe or watch.


•It is important to understand that activities are not just planned activities. Activities can include life skills, such as encouraging patients to hold their tooth brush, wash cloth or to choose an item of clothing. Mealtime activities may include folding napkins, setting the table, clearing the table and washing dishes.


•Regular exercise is an important activity for overall health. It may help improve sleep and prevent restlessness.


•Walking: Take short walks if distance is a problem, and then slowly progress to longer walks. Make sure the patient, is in comfortable clothing and shoe laces are tied. If the weather does not permit, utilize the hallway of a building or an indoor shopping mall. A stroll in the wheelchair is also good exercise if the person is able to propel themselves.


•For chair exercise use props such as streamers, maracas, batons, pom-poms, canes, stretch bands, tambourines, clappers, top hats, scarves, or small hand held balls. Hand held props help develop hand strength and provides stimulating visuals for the patient.


•Music is another important activity for patients with Alzheimer's. It may help in calming the individual, bringing back memories and adding to the quality of life.


•Activities using music can include sing-a-longs and name-that-tune. Tunes should be short, catchy and easy to follow. They should also be easy to recognize and remember. Relaxing music is suggested for mealtimes and toward the end of the day.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Group activities improve mental functioning in dementia patients

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Barchester.com

Partaking in group mental activities to stimulate thought, conversation and memory improves the cognitive functioning of people with mild or moderate dementia, according to researchers.

A recent study claims that cognitive stimulation of patients through structured activities in a group setting one or more times a week for at least a month can improve the symptoms of dementia.

The sessions can include a discussion of current events, a show-and-tell, or drawing, among other activities.

According to Robert Winningham, professor at the University of Western Oregon, the study shows that patients in a care home facility could have better dementia outcomes if workers make use of interaction possibilities.

"This is showing the people who work in memory care communities and nursing homes and
assisted living facilities that they can improve cognitive function, and they need to be providing these kinds of interventions," he told Reuters.

The study contributes to the growing body of research that suggests keeping the brain active can help combat dementia.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Make your next event a success


Activities directors, other health care professionals, others who order supplies for their organizations, and caregiver groups needing supplies for large group get togethers, here is some information that will be most helpful.

As activity directors and others are responsible for planning events, you want to get supplies that are cost effective and come to you quickly. You also need supplies that are unique. Atlanta Hotel Supply has a wide variety of items that you will probably need. Ordering online is most convenient because you can do it from the comfort of your desk or mobile phone. Hotel Supplies Online  is very user friendly and has an almost unlimited array of things you will need for your next large event.

If you work for a nursing home or an assisted living facility, you can share these Hotel Bar Supplies with persons responsible for all your needs because you will find these supplies to be of high quality and you can not get things you may not be able to find from a typical vendor.

We had an Easter party the other day. We were able to get everything we needed. The party was a huge success. I am sure our next big event will be great as well.

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Best ever Easter gifts for those with dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]





Choosing the right present for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia is certain to give him/her joyful times independently or with a loved one. Here are some tips on how to pick a perfect gift.


Over 5.4 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or work with? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease an Easter gift that will keep on giving long after the holiday is gone.


Of course, person appropriate offerings are the best. This means matching a gift to a person’s interests and abilities, However, there are some presents that will make them smile no matter what.


One such gift is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.
There is an activity related to hats that is most appropriate around Easter time.


If the person is a hat lover, buying him/her a new bonnet for Easter is an extraordinary idea. It will bring back fond memories of past Easters. Perhaps you can dig out some old Easter bonnets to try on as well as talk about, together, as Susan Berg suggests in her book. You could also have fun going through an old chest of clothes,

Friday, March 1, 2013

Are you reading Alzheimer's Caregivers Guide Magazine

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Here is some information related to an activity for lower functioning residents for or around St. Patrick's Day or any other day in a past issue of,  "Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine/Current Activities in Geriatric Care"



Koosh balls, springs, bendable toys, glitter wands, squishy stars or other shapes, large pony tale holders, tissue paper, emery boards, cotton, tin foil, stuffed animals, books, folders, small pillows, cymbals, bells, scratch and sniff stickers, magic markers, paper bags, paper plates, envelopes, rug samples, napkins, jar openers, ribbon, or greeting cards. If you think of more, your ideas add them in the comment section. 

Friday, February 15, 2013

Engineering Students Create Therapy Devices for Dementia Patients


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

This article may interest you. Perhaps you could partner with a school


By Steve Harmic, Penn State DuBois


DUBOIS – Thanks to a group of freshman engineering students at Penn State DuBois, some area dementia patients are finding comfort in spite of their illness. The students recently applied their engineering know-how to create devices that stimulate the minds of those suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease and other forms of dementia, and those devices are now being used daily at Christ the King Manor Nursing Home in DuBois.
The items, entirely designed and built by the engineering students, vary in the activities and stimuli that they provide for patients.  One of them is a soft blanket that has had LED lights and an MP3 player sewn into it, offering stimulus to the eyes, ears, and skin all at once.
Another device utilizes an air pump to create moving bubbles in a lighted, water-filled tube.  Yet another device is built as a platform with various objects attached, such as buttons and zippers that allow patients to utilize their fine-motor skills.  Then, there is a Plexiglas table which is lighted from below, that provides patients the opportunity to create pictures on the glass with sand. Overall, this stimulation to sight, hearing, and touch, brings a sense of clarity and sharpness to the minds of the residents that use them.
“It occupies their thinking and they become more alive; it wakes them up,” said Marsha Miles, the memory support supervisor at Christ the King Manor.  She explained that while the residents often do become alert during these exercises, they are also contented. She said, “These activities they created for the residents to do bring a calming effect to them.”
“This not only provided some great experience to the students, but also allowed them to participate in some great community outreach,” said Daudi Waryoba, the assistant professor of engineering who assigned the projects.  He explained, “Their big project for the fall semester was to come up with a design and develop a system to stimulate elderly patients with dementia. They could use any kind of material.  This gave them freedom to think about a project on their own, develop it using their classroom and lab lessons, and put it to good use in the community for people who need it.”
According to the students, all of Waryoba’s goals for the project were reached.
“We spent a lot of time researching what materials we could use,” said student Cody Wood of Marion Center, who was a member of the team that created the lighted bubble stimulation machine.  “It takes a lot of time and research before you even start anything.  Then, you put everything into practice.  This showed us a big part of that engineering process, so it was really helpful.”
Wood also enjoyed the gratification of doing something special for the residents at Christ the King.  He said, “I think it’s a great concept; it’s a good cause.  It makes you feel good as a person to help people,”
According to the professionals at Christ the King, the student projects certainly do help people.  Miles said, “I’m impressed with the students.  I believe they gave everything they had in these projects.  They worked so well, and thought outside the box.”
“It was especially meaningful to see these students connect with their hearts, as well as using their minds, talent and education,” said Michelle DiGilarmo, director of human resources at Christ the King Manor. “They learned about some of the challenges our residents face and developed concepts that were right on.  It was thrilling to be a part of such a worthwhile project where engineering students experienced, firsthand, how something they could design would impact a life.”