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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Fun facts to share: New Years


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information



Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



The History of New Year's Resolutions

The tradition of the New Year's Resolutions goes all the way back to 153 B.C. Janus, a mythical king of early Rome was placed at the head of the calendar.

With two faces, Janus could look back on past events and forward to the future. Janus became the ancient symbol for resolutions and many Romans looked for forgiveness from their enemies and also exchanged gifts before the beginning of each year.

The New Year has not always begun on January 1, and it doesn't begin on that date everywhere today. It begins on that date only for cultures that use a 365-day solar calendar. January 1 became the beginning of the New Year in 46 B.C., when Julius Caesar developed a calendar that would more accurately reflect the seasons than previous calendars had.

The Romans named the first month of the year after Janus, the god of beginnings and the guardian of doors and entrances. He was always depicted with two faces, one on the front of his head and one on the back. Thus he could look backward and forward at the same time. At midnight on December 31, the Romans imagined Janus looking back at the old year and forward to the new. The Romans began a tradition of exchanging gifts on New Year's Eve by giving one another branches from sacred trees for good fortune.

Later, nuts or coins imprinted with the god Janus became more common New Year's gifts.
In the Middle Ages, Christians changed New Year's Day to December 25, the birth of Jesus. Then they changed it to March 25, a holiday called the Annunciation. In the sixteenth century, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar, and the celebration of the New Year was returned to January 1.

The Julian and Gregorian calendars are solar calendars. Some cultures have lunar calendars, however. A year in a lunar calendar is less than 365 days because the months are based on the phases of the moon. The

Chinese use a lunar calendar. Their new year begins at the time of the first full moon (over the Far East) after the sun enters Aquarius- sometime between January 19 and February 21.

Although the date for New Year's Day is not the same in every culture, it is always a time for celebration and for customs to ensure good luck in the coming year.

Ancient New Years

The celebration of the New Year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, Babylonians celebrated the beginning of a new year on what is now March 23, although they themselves had no written calendar.

Late March actually is a logical choice for the beginning of a new year. It is the time of year that spring begins and new crops are planted. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.

The Babylonian New Year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.

The Romans continued to observe the New Year on March 25, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun. In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the New Year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the New Year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

Sunday, December 25, 2016

MERRY CHRISTMAS or HAPPY CHANUKAH

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition


To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very merry Christmas.

Try to relax on Christmas day. Enjoy the holiday. Remember it is not just about giving gifts, but more importantly, it is about being with family and friends and taking pleasure in their company.

It is about remembering the good times and forgetting the bad. It is about letting go of useless grudges.

It is about enjoying the moment because with dementia, that is all you may get. Remember to create your own moments of joy so you and your dementia friends can have the most joyous holiday possible

Thank you all for making “Activities Director” a stop on your blogging journey. In the days to come, I will be discussing more information about dementia that you will find most helpful. See you soon and…..

MERRY CHRISTMAS or HAPPY CHANUKAH

From Susan Berg author of Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful Mind Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Fairy Tale Songs


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

The best album I could find is Disney Princess: Fairy Tale Songs

Here are the songs on the CD


1 Mandy Moore2:34
2 Anika Noni Rose2:26
3 Jodi Benson3:14
4 Robby Benson / Angela Lansbury / Paige O'HaraJerry Orbach / David Ogden Stiers2:19
5 Lea Salonga2:26
6 Zachary Levi / Mandy Moore3:46
7 Anika Noni Rose2:52
8 Ilene Woods4:36
9 Judy Kuhn2:43
10 Anika Noni Rose2:29
11 Angela Lansbury2:46
12 Adriana Caselotti3:08
13 Mary Costa1:32
14 Shannon Saunders2:53
15[CD-Rom Track]
You can also get CDs of individual fairy tale sound tracks such as 


You can also visit Disney Song Lyrics for more fairy tale songs



Monday, December 12, 2016

How to Deal With a Difficult Nursing Home Resident

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Jae Ireland

Step 1Check with the resident's doctor to rule out any medical reason as to why he would be acting out, such as Alzheimer's disease. It may be a medical condition that can be remedied with therapy or medication. Once a medical cause is rule out, you can focus on other ways to cope.

Step 2Take the time to get to know the resident. What are her likes and dislikes? What things can calm her easily? What type of past does she have? Taking the time to get to know the resident may create a special bond for you, resulting in a calmer and happier resident.

Step 3Engage the resident in activities that he enjoys. Take special care that he is invited to nursing home events and outings, as well as individual activities such as reading or working in the arts. Taking the resident's mind off of his surroundings and circumstances may result in a less difficult resident.

Step 4Make sure that the resident has plenty of visitors. Residents can sometimes become difficult when they are bored or feel like they are forgotten. If there isn't family around to visit the resident, try asking for volunteers in your community to come for a visit two or three times a week.

Step 5Discourage bad behavior by not rewarding it. Make sure to not respond with a reaction or anger. Instead be patient with the resident, and try and see things from her point of view

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Links to popular fairy tales

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm
Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
Fairy Tales by Charles Perrault

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Classic Fairy tales to read to those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

To go along with National Tell a Fairy Tale Day, here is a list of fairy tales and links to them that residents with dementia or other long term care residents will enjoy