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Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Happy New Year


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a happy new year

Try to relax. Enjoy the holiday. Remember it is about being with family and friends and taking pleasure in their company.

It is about remembering the good times and forgetting the bad. It is about letting go of useless grudges.

It is about enjoying the moment because with dementia, that is all you may get. Remember to create your own moments of joy so you and your dementia friends can have the most joyous holiday possible

Thank you all for making “Activities Director” a stop on your blogging journey. In the days to come, I will be discussing more information about dementia that you will find most helpful. See you soon and…..
 Happy New Year

From Susan Berg author of Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful Mind Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Learn about leap year people, events,and music

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

This information is for an activity discussed in the February E- magazine oF Activity Director Today

People
Famous people born on February 29 include*:
1468 – Pope Paul III (d. 1549)
Some people have a leap day birthday. ©iStockphoto.com/iofoto
1792 – Gioacchino Rossini, Italian composer(William Tell, The Barber of Seville) (d. 1868)
1896 – Morarji Desai, former Indian prime minister (d. 1995)
1916 – Dinah Shore, American singer (d. 1994)
1924 – Al Rosen, American baseball player
1924 – Carlos Humberto Romero, former president of El Salvador
1960 – Richard Ramirez, American serial killer
1960 – Anthony (Tony) Robbins, American motivational speaker
1964 – Lyndon Byers, Canadian hockey player
1972 – Antonio Sabàto Jr, Italian-born actor
1976 – Ja Rule, American rapper and actor
1980 – Chris Conley, American musician and songwriter/composer
Events
Events that took place on February 29 in history include*:
1692 – First accusations began during the Salem witch trials. The trials occurred in Massachusetts in the United States, where more than 150 people were arrested and at least 25 people died by hanging, torture or during their prison stay.
1848 – Neufchatel declares the independence of Switzerland.
1940 – Hattie McDaniel was the first African American actress to win an Oscar. She won the Best Supporting Actress award for her role as “Mammy” in Gone with the Wind. The movie won eight Oscars.
1944 – The invasion of the Admiralty Islands began as United States General Douglas MacArthur led his forces in "Operation Brewer". Troops surged onto Los Negros, following a month of Allied advances in the Pacific. This event was one of the highlights of World War II.
1952 – The first “Walk/Don't Walk” signs were installed in New York City.
1964 – Australian swimmer Dawn Fraser received her 36th world record. She was timed at 58.9 seconds in the 100-meter freestyle in Sydney, Australia. She was the first female swimmer to win gold medals in three consecutive Olympic Games (1956, 1960 and 1964).
1972 – The Carpenters received a gold record for the hit single Hurting Each Other. The Carpenters were a vocal and instrumental duo of siblings, Karen and Richard, who produced a softer style of music in an era when loud rock was in demand. They were one of the best-selling music artists in the 1970s. 1904 - On this day in Washington, DC, a seven-man commission was
 created to hasten the construction of the Panama Canal. Work began
 May 4th. It's always hard to get something going by committee; so we
 guess that's why it took seven men two months to get the work going.
 1920 - Dateline -- Budapest, Hungary: Miklos Horthy de Nagybanya
 became the Regent of Hungary just six months after leading a
 counterrevolution. He probably gained control because everyone else
 was distracted while trying to pronounce his name.
 1932 - Bing Crosby and the Mills Brothers teamed up to record "Shine"
  for Brunswick Records.
1936 - Fanny Brice brought her little girl character "Baby Snooks" to
 radio on "The Ziegfeld Follies of the Air" on CBS Radio. Miss Brice
 presented the character and later sang "My Man" on the program. She
 was 44 at the time, and was known as America's "Funny Girl" long
 before Barbra Streisand brought her even greater fame and notoriety
 nearly 30 years later.
 1940 - Hattie McDaniel was the first black person to win an Oscar. She
 won the Best Supporting Actress award for her role as Mammy in "Gone
 with the Wind". GWTW also won Best Picture, Best Actress for Vivien
 Leigh's performance and Best Director for Victor Fleming, Best
 Screenplay for Sidney Howard's writing plus awards for Color
 Cinematography, Interior Decoration and Film Editing. Other Oscar
 winners on this night were Best Actor, Robert Dunat in "Goodbye, Mr.
 Chips", and Best Supporting Actor, Thomas Mitchell in "Stagecoach".
 1944 - The invasion of the Admiralty Islands began on this date as U.S.
 General Douglas MacArthur led his forces in "Operation Brewer".
 Troops surged
onto Los Negros, following a month of Allied advances in
 the Pacific.
 1944 - The first woman appointed secretary of a national political party
 was named to the Democratic National Committee. Dorothy McElroy
 Vredenburgh of Alabama began her new appointment this day. 1944 -
 The Office of Defense Transportation, for the second year, restricted
 attendance at the Kentucky Derby to residents of the Louisville area to
 prevent a railroad traffic burden during wartime. We imagine that horses
 were allowed in from elsewhere, though...
 1952 - New York City pedestrians were told when to walk and when
 not to as four signs were installed at 44th Street and Broadway in Times
 Square. Each sign flashed "Walk" for 22 seconds, then "Don't Walk" for
 ten seconds before the "Don't Walk" turned red for 58 seconds more.
 We're told that eight out of ten people obeyed the signs ... not bad for
 New Yorkers who will walk right through one door of a car and out the
 other to get across the street quickly.
 1960 - A report from the White House stated that America's kids were
  getting too fat! I'll have a cheeseburger, fries and a shake.
 1964 - Dawn Fraser got her 36th world record this day. The Australian
 swimmer was timed at 58.9 seconds in the 100-meter freestyle in
  Sydney, Australia.
 1964 - The United States was in the grip of Beatlemania! "I Want to
 Hold Your Hand", by the lads from Liverpool, was in its 5th week at #1
 on the pop charts. It stayed there until March 21, when it was replaced
 by "She Loves You", which was replaced by "Can't Buy Me Love",
  which was finally replaced by "Hello Dolly", by Louis Armstrong, on May
 9, 1964. 14 straight weeks of #1 stuff by the Beatles! Yeah, yeah, yeah...
 1964 - Hang on to your racquets on this one, sports fans: A shuttlecock
 drive record was set by Frank Rugani this day. Mr. Rugani slammed the
  birdie 79-feet, 8-1/2 inches in a test at San Jose, CA. A giant leap for
  badminton. A little leap for all mankind.
 1972 - The U.S. Justice Department had recently settled an antitrust
 lawsuit in favor of International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation.
  On this date, newspaper columnist, Jack Anderson revealed a memo
 written by ITT's Washington lobbyist, Dita Beard, that connected ITT's
 funding of part of the Republican National Convention with the resulting
 lawsuit settlement.
1972 - Swimmer Mark Spitz was named the 1971 James E. Sullivan
Memorial Trophy winner as the top amateur athlete in America.
1972 - Karen and Richard Carpenter of Downey, CA, received a gold
record for the hit single "Hurting Each Other". When they tore the golden
platter from its protective frame and plunked it on the player, they heard,
"Hurt So Bad", by Little Anthony and the Imperials. They were so upset
by this that they ran out to the back yard and used the record as a
Frisbee for the rest of the day. (Some of the preceding is based upon
actual fact.)
1988 - "Day by Day", a situation comedy, premiered on this date on
NBC-TV. It was one of the "yuppie sitcoms" that were all over the TV
dial in the late '80s. This particular one was about a suburban
overachieving couple who dropped out and opened up a day-care center
in their home to spend more quality time with their children. The quality
time lasted just under five months.
1956
                        The Great Pretender - The Platters
                        Band of Gold - Don Cherry
                        The Poor People of Paris - Les Baxter and his Orchestra
                        I Hear You
Knocking - Gale Storm
                        1964
                        I Want to Hold Your Hand - The Beatles
                        Dawn (Go Away) - The Four Seasons
                        You Don't Own Me - Leslie Gore
                        See the Funny Little Clown - Bobby Goldsboro
 
                        1972
                        Without You - Nilsson
                        Never Been to Spain - Three Dog Night
                        American Pie - Don McLean
                        It's Four in the Morning - Faron Young
                        1984
                        Jump - Van Halen
                        Girls Just Want to Have Fun - Cyndi Lauper
                        Thriller - Michael Jackson
                        Stay Young - Don Williams
                        Special thanks to 440 International Inc.

Friday, December 25, 2015

Sadie Hawkin's Day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

This information is for an activity discussed in the February E- magazine oF Activity Director Today

Sadie Hawkins Day is a fun holiday usually celebrated on February 29 on leap years Sadie is a comic strip character. Over the decades, it has developed into a well-known celebration.

Sadie Hawkins was created by a man called Al Capp. He wrote a now-classic cartoon called Li'l Abner. He worked on this from 1934 to 1977. Ms Hawkins lived in a small rural community in the fictional town of Dogpatch.

She waited and waited and waited for a marriage proposal, but none came. At the age of 35, her father struck upon an idea to marry off his daughter. He decided to name a day after his daughter.

There was a special event on this day(Feb 29). Sadie had to chase all the unmarried men in the town. Whoever she caught, she would marry.

The bachelor chase in the cartoon strip is still observed today in many places in the USA. The most common events are special parties at which girls can approach boys and ask them to dance. The parties are sometimes called "WPAs" (Women Pay All) or "Turnabout". Obviously, this is because the girls invite the boys and pay for dinner and dance tickets, etc. These events are declining in popularity. In 1952, there were over 40,000 Sadie Hawkins Day events. Nowadays, with the rise of the modern feminist movement, it has become more of a fun event. It is common today to “go dutch,” which is when a man and woman split the bill at a restaurant.

Some people celebrate Sadie Hawkins Day in November

Thursday, December 24, 2015

How to Help Those with Alzheimer’s Enjoy the Holiday Season

As an Activoiies Director,other healthcare professional, or cavegiver, you will be interested in this

About.com
By Carrie Hill, PhD,
While people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, often enjoy the holiday season, those with early-stage Alzheimer's might feel a special sense of loss during this time. And those in the middle or later stages could become overwhelmed by the influx of people and boisterous celebrations. Here are three ways to help your loved one enjoy the holiday season:

Involve your relative in holiday preparations. Have your loved one help with tasks she enjoys, and adapt those tasks to her current abilities. For instance, she could help you wrap gifts ....read the whole article

Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Animals that leap

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

This information is for an activity discussed in the February E- magazine oF Activity Director Today

Animals that leap or jump

Most animals can leap, and some are really good at it.


Antelopes, gazelles, tigers, leopards, cats, monkeys, flying squirrels, gliding lizards and horses (think:  dressage), kangaroos lions, tigers, rabbits, grasshoppers and frogs


In fact, most types of animals can leap with the exception of large ungulates such as elephants, rhinos, hippos, etc.

Monday, December 21, 2015

Why there is leap year

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Leap year comes every four years

Learn why

subscribe to the  Activity Director e-magazine to learn about great leap year activities in the February 2016 edition



It was the ancient Egyptians who first figured out that the solar year and the man-made calendar year didn't always match up.
That's because it actually takes the Earth a little longer than a year to travel around the Sun — 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 46 seconds, to be exact.
Therefore, as the hours accumulated over the centures, an extra day was occasionally added to the calendar, and over time the practice became more or less official.
The Romans first designated February 29 as leap day, but a more precise formula (still in use today) was adopted in the 16th century when the Gregorian calendar fine-tuned the calculations to include a leap day in years only divisible by four - 2012, 2016, 2020, 2024, etc.
Another stipulation ruled that no year divisible by 100 would have a leap year, except if it was divisible by 400. Thus, 1900 was not a leap year ... but 2000 was! Go figure.
Thankfully, all this intricate plotting will continue to keep us in tune with the seasons over the next several thousand years.
While leap day helped official timekeepers, it also resulted in social customs turned upside down when February 29 became a "no man's land" without legal jurisdiction.





 
As the story goes, the tradition of women romantically pursuing men in leap years began in 5th century Ireland, when St. Bridget complained to St. Patrick about the fair sex having to wait for men to propose. Patrick finally relented and set February 29 aside as the day set aside allowing women the right to ask for a man's hand in marriage.

The tradition continued in Scotland, when Queen Margaret declared in 1288 that on February 29 a woman had the right to pop the question to any man she fancied. Menfolk who refused were faced with a fine in the form of a kiss, a silk dress, or a pair of gloves given to the rejected lady fair.
A similar modern American tradition, Sadie Hawkins Day, honors "the homeliest gal in the hills" created by Al Capp in the cartoon strip Li'l Abner. In the famous story line, Sadie and every other woman in town were allowed on that day to pursue and catch the most eligible bachelors in Dogpatch. Although the comic strip placed Sadie Hawkins Day in November, today it has become almost synonymous with February 29.

Why are leap years needed?

Leap years are needed to keep our calendar in alignment with the earth's revolutions around the sun.
The next leap year will occur in 2016

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Edible Christmas tree ornaments

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two
That being said, bread dough ornaments ARE fun, easy, and cheap!!!! They would be fun to make on a snow day, or to minimize the wait, you could always make up the “blanks”- baked circles- and then just have the kids decorate them. Wouldn’t this be fun with a girls scout troup, classroom, or even as an activity in a nursing home? It’s so inexpensive, it’s a great craft even in this economy.
Here’s a basic salt dough recipe:
  • ½ cup salt
  • 1 cup flour
  • ½ cup water
Just mix together until the dough is formed. Then roll it out, and cut it with cookie cutters in the shape of your choice. Bake at 250 F for 2 hours until they are all dried out. Paint with acrylics, decoupage, sprinkle with glitter, go wild. You’ll want to make sure that it’s sealed well with paint, glaze or decoupage medium to keep them intact for years to come. Kaboose has some good ideas to check out, too!
Go get messy and happy crafting!

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Twelve Days of Christmas

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Make sure you are ready for Christmas this year.


Here are the lyrics to the song, The Twelve Days of Christmas.


Use them for a Christmas activity with your residents


On the first day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
A Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the second day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the third day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the fourth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Four Calling Birds*
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the fifth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the sixth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the seventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the eighth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the ninth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Nine Ladies Dancing
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the tenth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Ten Lords a Leaping
Nine Ladies Dancing
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
Eleven Pipers Piping
Ten Lords a Leaping
Nine Ladies Dancing
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love sent to me:
12 Drummers Drumming
Eleven Pipers Piping
Ten Lords a Leaping
Nine Ladies Dancing
Eight Maids a Milking
Seven Swans a Swimming
Six Geese a Laying
Five Golden Rings
Four Calling Birds
Three French Hens
Two Turtle Doves
and a Partridge in a Pear Tree

Sunday, December 13, 2015

Considerations for the Holidays for Staff Working with Persons with Dementia and their Families


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Murray Alzheimer's Research and Education Program

v Holidays may be a joyous celebration for some and distressing or sad for others. Some
clients/residents may have family or friends who visit and others may be alone. Be sensitive to the
needs and feelings of persons with dementia at this time of year.
v Be respectful and take the time to learn about the person with dementia – their preferences, culture,
religion and ethnicity. Provide opportunities for persons with dementia to celebrate the holidays
according to their own preferences. Invite clients/residents, whether living at home or in the
community, to participate in holiday and other recreational festivities as appropriate.
v Families can be asked to share photo albums of previous holiday celebrations which can often
assist with a relaxing form of reminiscence. For some people, playing familiar holiday movies and
holiday music can be comforting. This can be a helpful strategy for persons who are restless
during evening/overnight shifts.
v Where appropriate, holiday decorating can be used both as an enjoyable activity or a topic of
conversation. Sharing holiday practices and traditions from a person’s country of birth can be a
meaningful exchange for both staff and persons with dementia.
v Pay attention to the person sitting alone in their room or who does not get visitors. Providing them
with a holiday card (e.g., Christmas, Chanukah) or seasonal plant may bring cheer to them – take
the time to stop by and visit those who may need comfort or would enjoy a smiling face.
v Do consider the noise level and multiple distractions that can impact upon a person with dementia
with possible increased activity and visits to a person’s home or longterm
care home.
v Be considerate of the words “do you remember.” Staff may explore broader reflections like “how
do you like to spend the holiday?” or “Tell me about what you enjoy about the holidays.” If need
be, ask closed ended questions like “did you used to skate/go on sleigh rides/cook a big meal
during the holidays?”
v Be sensitive to family members who can no longer celebrate the holidays as they once did. This
may be a difficult time for them – provide as much continuity in the lives of the person with
dementia and their family partners in care as possible (e.g., dinner together). Provide opportunities
for persons with dementia and their families to celebrate the holidays together through shared
family activities and programs


Wednesday, December 9, 2015

More Christmas Ideas for Those with Dementia

These ideas can also be used with others who reside at a long term care facility
Therefore Activities Directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers will find this post of interest

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter



Alzheimer’s Care Group



Christmas Ideas

Hard to believe that Christmas is just around the corner.  Commericals for Christmas sales are already beginning to pop up on the TV.  Here is a great idea for Christmas gifts that can be made by your residents.
Dough Art

Overview
Dough Art is a fun activity that gives residents the chance to use their hands and imagination.  The residents may use the dough to make ornaments and give them as Christmas gifts.

Purpose
·        To stimulate creativity and imagination
·        To give residents a sense of accomplishment
·        To provide sensory stimulation

Materials
Two cups of flour
One cup of salt
Water
Large bowl
Mixing spoon
Spice, such as ginger or nutmeg (optional)
Cookie cutters
Baking sheet (optional)
Paints (optional)
Ribbon or string (optional)

Set-up
Arrange chairs around a table.

Process
1.      Ask for one or two volunteers to help make the dough.
2.      Direct the volunteers to pour the flour and salt into the bowl. Next, tell them to mix together the flour, salt and spice (optional) with the mixing spoon.  Then, direct them to add just enough water so that the mix becomes a workable dough ball.
3.      Give each resident a chance to knead the dough.  Note: knead the dough for about 10 minutes total.
4.     
Separate the dough into balls.  Give one dough ball to each resident.

           Let the residents choose from the cookie cutters or simply mold the dough by hand.
Making Ornaments
1.      Place the dough shapes onto a baking sheet. Next, make a hole at the top of each shape so it may be hung later by a ribbon or string. Then, place the baking sheet into an oven heated to 300 degrees and bake for 1 ½ hours.
2.      Remove the baking sheet from the oven and let the ornaments cool.
3.      Set the paints out.  Next, direct the residents to paint the items they made.  Then, let the items dry.
4.      Set out the ribbons or string.  Next, direct the residents to tie the ribbon or string to the top of each ornament.
5.      Suggest that the residents may want to give an ornament to a family member or friend as a Christmas gift.
6.      Ask for volunteers to help clean up.


More ideas for those with dementia and others in long term care



Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Hearing Music From His Era.


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

By Bob DeMarco
Alzheimer's Reading Room


The Music and Memory video took off because a viewer with lots of social influence posted the link to the video on Reddit. This points out how sharing an article can give it a "big life", and allows information to be found by persons all over the world. Hint.

In case you missed it, here is another view of the video, Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Hearing Music From His Era.

The video is before and after these other articles aboutthepowerofmusic for those with dementia


Saturday, December 5, 2015

Suggest Appropriate Gifts for Those with Dementia



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


As an activities director, you are in a position to suggest gifts for family members to buy for their loved ones with dementia. Here is an article that will help you, other healthcare professionals and caregivers
prlog
Christmas,Chanukah and alike are the perfect chance to give gifts that are not only enjoyable but also are beneficial to persons with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia. These presents keep on giving long after the holiday season is gone
First on the list of gifts is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.

Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a....read the whole article




Saturday, November 21, 2015

What's My Thanksgiving Line?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter 


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition 
 

Here is a dementia Thanksgiving activity


A Game About Thanksgiving Food for Dementia Sufferers, Long-Term Care Residents



Thanksgiving is right around the corner and will be here before you know it.


This game is ideal for folks with Alzheimer's disease, related dementias, other long-term care residents, those attending adult daycare and people with these diseases living at home.


The group leader can be an activity staff member, other long-term care staff member, a volunteer or family member.


This game is easy to do, a lot of fun, can be adapted and modified for other occasions, and can be used with a wide variety of audiences.


The game is loosely based on the classic television show called, What's My Line. This program originally aired in the 1950s and 60s.


Instead of guessing the guests profession, the guest is pretending to be a Thanksgiving dish.


Before starting the activity, set the stage for the group or individual playing. Tell them that each person is going to pretend to be a food served at a Thanksgiving dinner.


It is probably best to discuss foods eaten on Thanksgiving first. If possible, give each participant a list of food eaten during Thanksgiving. The list can be given before the discussion or after depending on the group's cognitive level. Alternately, you could have a whiteboard or a blackboard and write down the foods as they are mentioned.


As the foods are talked about, it is probably a good idea to discuss the characteristics of the food to remind the group members about the foods. You could include this information on your list.


You will also want to have pictures of popular Thanksgiving foods. You could also write a food name on an index card to hand to the participant who is having trouble thinking of a food on his own. Have a number of cards, each with a food written on it. Also have some blank cards for those who have thought of a food on their own. Handing them the card with the food name on it is a good reminder of the food's name should they forget what they chose.


Remember, folks with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias have poor short term memory.


After the discussion, it is time to play the game. Tell the group or individual again that each person is going to have a turn "being" a Thanksgiving food

Choose a person in the group to be the first contestant. You could be the first player to show everyone how the game is played.

Give the player a card with a
food name written on it or have a short private conversation to decide what the food to be guessed will be

Tell all we are going to ask the contestant about the
food he is pretending to be

Here is a sample list of questions.

Alter it as needed

Is the
food a vegetable, meat, or dessert?

Is the
food served hot or cold?

What color is the food?

You may have to provide a choice of two colors

Is the
food hard or soft?

Is the
food sweet, sour, etc?

Do you
eat the food with a fork or spoon?

After each question is asked and answered, ask if someone wants to guess what the
food is.

Give each person in the group a turn to pretend to be a food.

During the activity, make sure you or the group leader is excited and animated. Make it sound like you are really on a
game show.

You could give out prizes or hugs to those who guess correctly.

This
game is a perfect lead into other discussions about Thanksgiving.

You can reminisce about past Thanksgivings. You can talk about why you are thankful for each person there, or what each participant is thankful for. Planning a Thanksgiving
dinner might also be fun. Also sharing favorite Thanksgiving recipes is sure to be enjoyable.

When you are finished, thank everyone for coming. Tell them how much you enjoyed being with them

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Soup Humor

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


It is always good to make those with dementia and other long term care residents laugh. With that I bring you

Soup Humor

• He's the only man I ever knew who had rubber pockets so he could steal soup. (Wilson Mizner)
• You ever wonder if illiterate people get the full effect of alphabet soup? (John Mendoza)
• He found a great way to eat his wife's soup. He pretends it's mud. (Milton Berle)
• I once cut my mouth on my wife's soup. (Milton Berle)
• She loves to make soup--especially cream of yesterday. (Milton Berle)
• I cast my bread upon the waters tonight. Of course my wife claimed it was soup.
• Everything she cooks turns out tough. Can anyone lend me a soup knife?
• A physicist, a chemist, and an economist are stranded on an island with nothing to eat. A can of soup washes ashore. The physicist says, "Let's smash the can open with a rock." The chemist says, "Let's build a fire and heat the can first." The economist says, "Let's assume that we have a can-opener."
• I put instant soup in a microwave and almost went back in time."
• "I make soup so thick that when I stir it, the room goes round."
• "We were eating in this open-air café when it started raining. It took us an hour and a half to finish our soup."
• "She's such a noisy eater that when she started on the soup, six people got up and started doing the polka."
• guy goes into a restaurant and orders soup from a waitress. The waitress goes into the kitchen and the man passes his time waiting by looking out the window. When the waitress returns, he says, "Looks like rain." The waitress says, "Yeah, but it's soup!!" (Thanks to Doug Bonner of Fuzhou, China, for the cite.)

Friday, November 13, 2015

Types of Soup

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Types of Soup

Definition of Soup Classifications
"Traditionally, soups are classified into two broad groups: clear soups and thick soups." "The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé." "Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish thickened with cream; cream soups are thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter and cream." "Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, flour, and grain."

Did you know? "The word soup originates from "sop", a dish originally consisting of a soup or thick stew which was soaked up with pieces of bread."
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Dessert soups

* Ginataan, Filipino soup made from coconut milk, milk, fruits and tapioca pearls, served hot or cold.

* Oshiruko, a Japanese azuki bean soup

* Tong sui, a collective term for Chinese sweet soups.

* Etrog, a fruit soup made up from the citron used in Jewish Ritual at the feast of Succoth, is eaten by Ashkenazi.

* Naengmyeon - (Korean) buckwheat noodles in a tangy iced beef broth, raw julienned vegetables, a slice of a Korean pear, and often a boiled egg and/or cold beef.

* Fruktsuppe, Norwegian fruit soup, on dried fruit such as raisins and prunes.

* Fruit soups (see below)

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Fruit soups
"Fruit soups are served warm or cold depending on the recipe." "Many recipes are for cold soups served when fruit is in season during hot weather. Some like Norwegian fruktsuppe may be served warm and rely on dried fruit such as raisins and prunes and so could be made in any season. Fruit soups may include milk or cream, sweet or savoury dumplings, spices, or alcoholic beverages such as brandy or champagne. Cherry soup is made with table wine and/or port."

"Cold and warm fruit soups are common in Scandinavian, Baltic and Eastern European cuisines while hot fruit soups with meat appear in Middle Eastern, Central Asian and Chinese cuisines." "Cold fruit soups include krentjebrij."

"Fruit soups are uncommon or absent in the cuisines of the Americas, Africa and Western Europe." "They are also not seen in Japan, Southeast Asia or Oceania." "The exception is cold fruit soups that are savory rather than (or in addition to) sweet."

* Winter melon soup: is a Chinese soup, usually with a chicken stock base. It is a savory soup, often including other vegetables and mushrooms. Technically, the winter melon is a fruit, since it is a seed bearing body, but in practical use, it is a vegetable. Winter melon soup is often presented as a whole winter melon, filled with stock, vegetables and meat, that has been steamed for hours. The skin is decoratively cut, so that what is presented is a decorative centerpiece, smaller than a medicine ball, larger than a soccer ball, filled with soup. The flesh of the melon is scooped out with the soup.

* Gazpacho (from Spain and Portugal) is a savory soup based on tomato, a New World fruit.

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Cold soups
"Cold soups are a particular variation on the traditional soup, wherein the temperature when served is kept at or below room temperature." "They may be sweet or savory." "In summer, sweet cold soups can form part of a dessert tray." "Some soups are served only cold, and other soups can optionally be served cold."

* Cold borscht: There are two borscht, hot and cold. Both are based on beets, but are otherwise prepared and served differently.

* Cucumber soup: is a soup based on cucumbers, known in various cuisines.

* Gazpacho: (Spanish) pureed tomato and vegetable soup.

* Tarator: A Bulgarian cold soup made from yogurt and cucumbers.

* Vichyssoise: (French-American) creamy potato and leek soup, served with chives.

* Dashi soup: (Japanese) fish stock soup, with seasonal vegetables.

* Sour cherry soup: A cream-based Hungarian soup.


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Fish soups

* Bouillabaisse - (French) fish soup

* Cioppino - (Italian-American) fish stew with tomatoes and a variety of fish and shellfish

* Cullen Skink - A fish soup made with Smoked Haddock, potatoes, onions and cream from Scotland

* Fanesca - A traditional cod soup from Ecuador

* Fisherman's Soup - (Hungarian Halászlé, hot and spicy river fish soup with a lot of hot paprika

* Lan Sikik - A Thai soup made with noodle, dried fish and tomato extract.

* Psarosoupa (ψαρόσουπα) - Greek fish soup, uses a traditional oil-and-lemon sauce, vegetables, rice and sea fish

* Sliced fish soup, a dish from Singapore with fish, prawns and vegetables

* Sour soup (fish soup) - A Vietnamese dish made with rice, fish, various vegetables, and in some cases pineapple.

* Ukha or уха - Russian fish soup, made of cod or salmon, vegetables, lime, dill, parsley and black pepper

* Waterzooi - A Belgian fish soup

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Noodle soups

* Bird's nest soup is a delicacy in Chinese cuisine.

* Chicken Noodle Soup

* Fuhn, Chinese rice noodles in broth, usually beef, chicken or custom broth

* Egg drop soup¨, a savory Chinese soup made from cracking eggs into boiling water or broth.

* Log-log, Filipino egg noodle soup (regional variants include Kinalas, Batchoy)

* Mian, Chinese egg noodles in broth, usually beef, chicken or custom broth

* Pho, Vietnamese staple noodle soup

* Ramen, Japanese fresh or dried noodles in broth

* Pasta Fagioli - (Italian)

* Saimin, Hawaiian fresh, soft, undried egg noodles in bonito fish or shrimp broth with Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hawaiian, Korean and Portuguese influences

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Bisques
Heavy cream soups, with shellfish or puree of vegetables, fruits, or fish.

* Lobster bisque

* Crab bisque

* Tomato bisque

* Chestnut bisque

* Squash bisque

* Cream of Crab Soup

* Lobster Stew - cream-based soup with chunks of lobster

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Chowders
Thick soups usually containing seafood and potatoes, milk and cream

* Clam chowder

* Corn chowder

* Chupe

* Callaloo - A thick, creamy soup made with okra and, often, crab meat from Trinidad and Tobago

* New England Clam Chowder made with potatoes and cream

* Manhattan Clam Chowder, made with a tomato base.

* Maryland Crab Soup - A soup made of vegetables, blue crab, and Old Bay Seasoning in a tomato base. From Maryland, USA

* She-crab soup - from Charleston, South Carolina, a creamy soup made with blue crab meat and crab roe.

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Other broths

* Avgolemono - Greek soup made of lemon juice, rice, and egg yolk

* Bourou-Bourou - A vegetable and pasta soup from the island of Corfu, Greece

* Chicken noodle soup - Broth with pieces of chicken and noodles

* French onion soup: Broth made with onions and beef. Often topped with croutons and cheese.

* Scotch Broth - mutton, barley and various vegetables

* Tinola: Broth popular in the Philippines made with pieces of chicken, sliced green papayas.


Clear or Stocks: Brown Veal, White Beef, Fumet, Chicken, White Veal, Fish

* Broths: A flavored liquid usually derived from simmering a food or vegetable for a period of time in a stock.

* Consommés: A crystal clear broth or stock that is full of flavor, aroma, and body.

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Cream
"Thickened with a white sauce." "Although they can be consumed on their own, they often come in condensed form and can be used to create a variety of meat and pasta dishes."
Cream of tomato soup, Cream of mushroom soup, Cream of broccoli soup
Cream of celery soup, Cream of chicken soup, Cream of potato soup
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Beverage soups

* Beer soup - (European) medieval breakfast soup poured over bread)

* Wine soup. Hungarian soup with wine