"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

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Friday, March 31, 2017

More fun and active ideas for engaging an Alzheimer’s patient


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Alzheimer's Caregivers Guide

Gear activities to the patient’s ability to participate
Plan activities that the patient is interested in, such as art, cooking, walking, swimming, or gardening. Focus on enjoyment, not achievement.
If the person is lucid enough, involve them in making music, doing puzzles or crosswords, or playing memory games, card or board games. Or, the patient may passively enjoy hearing music, contact with pets, or sitting outside in the garden.

Use humor
Even when Alzheimer's patients no longer have the cognitive ability to understand your humor, they can still appreciate it. They may still smile or laugh and sharing that laughter can be a relief to both you and your charge. Use the same modes of humor as you always have: teasing, nonsense, clowning. Be even more silly than usual!

Get outdoors
Go for walks in the neighborhood, go for a drive, or spend time at a park.
Walking is often therapeutic, although the pace may not be as vigorous as you might like. Develop a style of paying more attention to the beauty and novelty of your surroundings as you walk.

Maintain an active social life
To counteract isolation and loneliness, encourage family and friends to stay involved. Take the patient to family gatherings if it’s comfortable to do so. Schedule visitors, to avoid surprises and have something to look forward to. Even if the elder with dementia does not recognize those who visit, the contact is nonetheless valuable for them.

Seek out organized group activities.
Senior centers and adult day care facilities usually provide opportunities for structured activities such as exercise, sharing meals, group games and socializing. Some programs are set up specifically to meet the needs of dementia patients. This will provide social stimulation for the patient and respite for you, the caregiver.

Join in
Sometimes the caregiver will want to join the patient in family gatherings or stay in the home when visitors are present. Caregivers can start feeling isolated and lonely themselves as more and more of their time is built around the elder’s needs. If the patient feels safe with the visitors, the caregiver can use the visiting time as an opportunity for relief and respite. Adult day care has similar benefits: social stimulation for the patient and free time for the caregiver.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Fun facts Leonardo Da Vinci

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition] 

  • Leonardo da Vinci was born on April 15, 1452 and died on May 2, 1519. He was Italian.
  • Different to a typical surname you might think of today, "da Vinci" simply means "of Vinci", the Tuscan town where he was born.
  • He lived during the Renaissance, a cultural movement that led to important developments in areas such as art and science.
  • Leonardo d Vinci is perhaps best known as a painter, with his legendary works including the Mona Lisa, the Vitruvian Man and the Last Supper, among others.
  • Leonardo da Vinci wasn't just an incredible artist, he was an inventor, scientist, mathematician, engineer, writer, musician and much more. Talk about talented!
  • His conceptual drawings included plans for musical instruments, war machines, calculators, boats and other ideas. Many of these plans were limited by the level of technology at the time.
  • Flight was of particular interest to da Vinci. He studied the flight of birds and created plans for flying machines that resemble hang gliders and helicopters.
  • Many of Leonardo da Vinci’s machines have since been built and tested, to varying levels of success.
  • He became an expert in the anatomy of the human body, studying it in detail and creating hundreds of drawings to help explain his thoughts.
  • The Vitruvian Man is a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci that describes the relationship between human proportions and geometry.
  • Da Vinci wrote in the opposite direction to what is normal, meaning you’d need a mirror to read it properly.
  • The Mona Lisa is perhaps the most well known painting in the world. It is a half-length portrait of a woman who, along with the composition, background and other details, has been the subject of much speculation and discussion. It is believed that Leonardo da Vinci began painting the Mona Lisa around 1503. It has been on permanent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris for over 200 years.
  • In 1994 Microsoft founder Bill Gates purchased perhaps Leonardo da Vinci’s most famous scientific writings, the ‘Codex Leicester’. It contains explanations of water movement, fossils and the moon among other things.
  • Famous Leonardo da Vinci quotes include:  "He who thinks little, errs much."
  • "Movement will cease before we are weary of being useful."
  • "What is fair in men, passes away, but not so in art."
  • "Drawing is based upon perspective, which is nothing else than a thorough knowledge of the function of the eye."
  • "Good culture is born of a good disposition; and since the cause is more to be praised than the effect, I will rather praise a good disposition without culture, than good culture without the disposition."
  • "I know that many will call this useless work."

Saturday, March 25, 2017

THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF HUMOR AND LAUGHTER

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Helpguide.org

  • Humor is infectious. The sound of roaring laughter is far
     more contagious than any cough, sniffle, or sneeze.

When laughter is shared, it binds people together and

increases happiness and intimacy. In addition to the domino

effect of joy and amusement, laughter also triggers healthy

physical changes in the body. Humor and laughter

strengthen your immune system, boost your energy,

diminish pain, and protect you from the damaging effects of

stress. Best of all, this priceless medicine is fun, free, and

easy to use. 


Laughter is strong medicine for mind and body


Laughter is a powerful antidote to stress, pain, and conflict. Nothing works faster or more dependably to bring your mind and body back into balance than a good laugh. Humor lightens your burdens, inspires hopes, connects you to others, and keeps you grounded, focused, and alert.
With so much power to heal and renew, the ability to laugh easily and frequently is a tremendous resource for surmounting problems, enhancing your relationships, and supporting both physical and emotional health.

Laughter is good for your health

  • Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good, hearty laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.
  • Laughter boosts the immune system. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.
  • Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.
  • Laughter protects the heart. Laughter improves the function of blood vessels and increases blood flow, which can help protect you against a heart attack and other cardiovascular problems.




Friday, March 24, 2017

April is Occupational Therapy Month

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

ehow

According to an article in “Age and Ageing” from 2004 in volume 33, pages 453-460, “occupational therapy interventions for elderly people in the community results in positive outcomes.” Nearly one-third of occupational therapists (OTR) and certified occupational therapy assistants (COTA) work with the geriatric population. They do a lot of types of treatments and activities, using many strategies. The main goal of helping those in the geriatric population is for them to regain or maintain the highest level of independence possible. It is the hope of most elderly people to stay in their homes as long as possible.

Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy commits to improving and maintaining the highest level of function possible of its clients so that people can have healthier, more productive and satisfying lives. Occupational therapy dedicates itself to quality health care which includes disease prevention, staying well and rehabilitation services for individuals across the lifespan. As people age, they use more occupational therapy services as a rule.

Effectiveness

Occupational therapy has been proven effective for the geriatric population, with a number of medical conditions and surgical recoveries. Besides working with individual people to increase their strength and regain important life skills, occupational therapists work with a geriatric community to counsel families, local governments and community groups to make sure that each group is doing its part to help older adults maintain their independence.

Conditions

The most common diseases, conditions and surgical recoveries that OTRs and COTAs are involved in for the elderly include: arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, broken shoulder, wrist, hip and knee replacement as well as repair or replacement of these body parts, depression, diabetes, sensory impairments and dementia. The key in geriatric care is to avoid these injuries and illnesses to begin with. To do this, OTRs and COTAs focus on adapting and modifying the performance of activities of daily living that have become difficult or impossible to do because of age-related changes, disorders or disabilities. Occupational therapy provides help with other activities that relate to geriatric clients that still work. They also find ways for elderly patients to be involved in leisure and social activities that are dependent upon the patient's capabilities and interests.

Settings
It is the aim of occupational therapy to improve the ability of elderly people so they can stay in their home. If institutionalized care is required, occupational therapy can enhance their lives there by helping them to maintain their highest level of function there, even if full recovery from a health issue is not possible.

Activities Of Daily Living

Occupational therapy focuses on ADLs because they are necessary for independent living. The basic ADLs include: going to the bathroom, bathing, grooming, dressing, eating and moving from one surface to another, such as moving from a chair to a bed or bathtub. Instrumental ADLs require more complex thinking. These tasks include things like preparing meals, using the telephone, operating a computer, managing finances and medications as well as cleaning; doing laundry, going shopping, and other errands, traveling from one place to another, which includes driving. Driving is quite complicated because it includes integration of visual, physical and mental tasks and being able to coordinate these tasks, which may be mild to moderately impaired as you age. Occupational therapy may help geriatric clients with other activities to help reduce the risks of social isolation and its detrimental consequences. They do this by assisting geriatric patients to maintain social activities they know and encouraging involvement in new ones as well as providing ways to promote continued learning and other mind-stimulating activities, which help promote feelings of self-worth and may help prevent dementia.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Irving Berlin brought joy throughout the years

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Jewish Virtual Library

Irving Berlin once said that, "a patriotic song is an emotion and you must not embarrass an audience with it, or they will hate your guts." This philosophy made him one of America's most outstanding writers of patriotic songs from World War I through World War II.
Berlin was born Israel Baline in Eastern Russia on May 11, 1888. He was one of eight children born to Leah and Moses Baline. His father was a shochet (one who kills kosher animals as prescribed by Jewish religious laws) who was also the cantor in the synagogue. His family moved to New York in 1893 to escape the pogroms in Russia. At the age of eight, he took to the streets of the Lower East Side of New York City to help support his mother and family after his father had died. In the early 1900s he worked as a singing waiter in many restaurants and started writing songs. His first published hit was "Marie From Sunny Italy." His successes continued through two years.
Berlin was married for only a year to Dorothy Goetz, who died from typhoid contracted while on their honeymoon in Cuba in 1913. He married Ellin Mackay in 1926. She was the daughter of Clarence Mckay, president of Postal Telegraph Company, a leading Catholic layman who opposed the wedding. The Berlins had three daughters.
In World War I, he wrote the musical Yip, Yip, Yaphank, which was produced by the men of Camp Upton. In this musical, the big hit song was "Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning," which reflected Berlin's aversion to rising early. This musical raised more than $150,000 to build a service center at Camp Upton.
On Armistice Day, 1938, he introduced "God Bless America," which was sung by Kate Smith. This song threatened to replace the national anthem because of its patriotism and popularity.
In World War II, he wrote the musical This is the Army, which raised $10 million for the Army Emergency Relief. His hits in this musical were "This is the Army, Mr Jones" and I Left My Heart at the Stage Door Canteen." He also wrote other patriotic songs such as "Any Bonds Today?," "Arms for the Love of America," and "Angels of Mercy" for the American Red Cross.
Berlin was prolific: He wrote more than 900 songs, 19 musicals and the scores of 18 movies. Some of his songs that have become classics include "There's No Business Like Show Business," "Easter Parade," and "White Christmas." He is the top money maker among songwriters in America. In 1924, songwriter Jerome Kern observed "Irving Berlin has no place in American music. He is American music."
Berlin supported Jewish charities and organizations and donated many dollars to worthwhile causes. He was honored in 1944 by the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "advancing the aims of the conference to eliminate religious and racial conflict." Five years later, he was honored by the New York YMHA as one of "12 outstanding Americans of the Jewish faith." On February 18, 1955, President Eisenhower presented him with a gold medal in recognition of his services in composing many patriotic songs for the country. Earlier, Berlin  assigned the copyright for "God Bless America" to the God Bless America Fund, which has raised millions of dollars for the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. Berlin's World War I doughboy uniform and many of his original patriotic scores are on display in the Jewish War Veterans Museum in Washington, D.C.
Irving Berlin died on September 22, 1989, at the age of 101.
Following a gala 100th birthday celebration concert at Carnegie Hall, Morton Gould, president of ASCAP, said that "Irving Berlin's music will last not for just an hour, not for just a day, not for just a year, but always." Not bad for a poor immigrant who had only two years of formal schooling and who never learned to read or write music!

Sources: Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America from Jewish Heroes & Heroines of America : 150 True Stories of American Jewish Heroism, © 1996, written by Seymour "Sy" Brody of Delray Beach, Florida, illustrated by Art Seiden of Woodmere, New York, and published by Lifetime Books, Inc., Hollywood, FL. Also, the Jewish-American Hall of Fame - Jewish Museum in Cyberspace. 


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

April Fool's Day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Here is something you may want to display or hand out in celebration of April Fool's Day

                                Join in the April Fools Day Fun
In 16th Century France, the new year began on  April 1. 
April Fools Day comes from this serious subject:
the adoption of a new calendar.
 Use this info to fill out this week’s educational handout

Monday, March 20, 2017

Person centered dementia activities reduce agitation in those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

DGNews

NEW YORK --  -- Both person-centred care and dementia-care mapping reduce agitation in people with dementia in residential care. In addition, person-centred approaches can be taught quickly and should be introduced as standard practice in residential care homes, according to a study released early online and appearing in the April issue of The Lancet Neurology.

Two individually tailored behavioural interventions already used widely in clinical practice, person-centred care and dementia-care mapping, have been shown to improve outcomes for people with dementia, but the evidence is mainly descriptive and observational.

To provide further evidence, Lynn Chenoweth, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia, and colleagues conducted the Caring for Aged Dementia Care Resident Study (CADRES) to examine the effectiveness of these interventions and whether they could improve quality of life, decrease need-driven dementia-compromised behaviours, or reduce the use of psychotropic drugs and rates of accidents and injuries.

The study included 15 residential care sites in Sydney involving 289 residents with dementia aged 60 years or older. Patients were randomly assigned to person-centred care, dementia-care mapping, or usual care,

Carers received training and support in the relevant intervention or continued usual care. The Cohen-Mansfield agitation inventory (CMAI) was used to measure 29 behaviours of agitation including biting, scratching, and hiding things. Patients were assessed before the intervention, after 4 months of the intervention, and then at 4 months' follow-up.

Findings showed that.....read the whole post

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Fragrance Day is March 21


Don't put up a stink about March 21. It  is Fragrance Day. It is a great smelling day. The olfactory nerves in your nose, will enjoy this special day. Ladies in particular, will enjoy today because they just love perfumes. And guys, you've gotta admit that your gal's perfume attracts you to her.

Perfumes have been in use for hundreds of years. In ancient times, they were used to hide body odors. At the time, baths were infrequent. After a few days, things began to smell less than ideal. Perfumes played an important role in making the atmosphere more palatable. Today, the daily shower eliminates the bad odors. But, we still like the smell and attraction of perfume. 

Celebrate today by buying some perfume or cologne for yourself, or  as a gift for someone. Make sure to put on just the right amount of perfume or cologne. Overpowering perfume ruins the value of the fragrance to the "sniffer".
Also, check your room deodorizers, and replace them with a new fragrance, if needed.



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Thursday, March 16, 2017

Quotes by famous women

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

National Women's Day is on March 11. Here are some quotes you can use to spark some great discussions

abcteach

• Adventure is worthwhile in itself. Amelia Earhart
• Do the best you can in every task, no matter how unimportant it may seem at the time. No one learns more about a problem than the person
at the bottom. Sandra Day O’Connor
• Giving frees us from the familiar territory of our own needs by opening our mind to the unexplained worlds  occupied by the needs of others.
Barbara Bush
Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul. Marilyn Monroe
• I do the very best I can to look upon life with optimism and hope and looking forward to a better day, but I don't think there is anything such as complete happiness. Rosa Parks
• I have become my own version of an optimist. If I can't make it through one door, I'll go through another door -- or I'll make a door. Something
terrific will come, no matter how dark the present. Joan Rivers
• If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation. Abigail Adams
• If you always do what interests you, at least one person is pleased. Katherine Hepburn
• In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can't build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery and death. Anne Frank
Independence is happiness. Susan B. Anthony
• Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless. Mother Teresa
• Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. Grandma Moses
• No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. Eleanor Roosevelt
• Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Marie Curie
• One of the things I learned the hard way was that it doesn't pay to get discouraged. Keeping busy and making optimism a way of life can restore your faith in yourself. Lucille Ball
• Thank goodness I was never sent to school; it would have rubbed off some of the originality. Beatrix Potter
• The important thing is not what they think of me, but what I think of them. Queen Victoria
• When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been
opened for us. Helen Keller
• Without leaps of imagination, or dreaming, we lose the excitement of possibilities. Dreaming, after all, is a form of planning. Gloria Steinem 

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

St. Patrick's day activity for low functioning residents



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Onto St. Patrick’s Day, as promised, here are two simple activities for St Patrick’s Day for lower functioning residents.
The first activity is making oatmeal. Call it Irish oatmeal. You can use instant oatmeal. It is best that you add the hot water and let it cool before giving it to a resident.
Have a variety of food items that can be added to the oatmeal. Give each participant at least one thing to add to her oatmeal. After adding it, have her mix it.
Here are some suggestions for oatmeal mixers: Sugar or sugar substitute, green jelly, green yogurt, green jello, green sugar sprinkles, green frosting, or green dry cereal, just to name a few. If you want, you can use different flavors of oatmeal. Also if you were going to do this activity at another time, you could add other typical oatmeal mixers.
While the residents are eating or preparing the oatmeal, have some Irish songs playing. After finishing the oatmeal, the residents could have an Irish song sing along or a discussion about St Patrick’s Day trivia.
Here is another activity for the lower functioning residents. Consider this sensory activity. Get material with a special feel or color to it. Of course, green for St Patrick’s Day. Compile pairs of other sensory item for St Patrick’s Day such as: four leaf clovers, lepricons or large gold coins. Have about 20 pairs of sensory items like socks, mittens, artificial flowers, shoestrings, a picture cut in half, yarn or anything you think your residents would like to feel For more ideas go to Actually you should have the at least the number of pairs as half the number of people in the group or the same amount of pairs as people in the group depending on how you want to play the game. Separate the items into two matching piles. Put one of each item in one bag and one of each item in another bag.
Now on to how to play the game. Count the number of participants. Make sure each person will get an item or pieces of fabric. You can have two people get the same item or you have each person get a different item. If you decide to let two people get the same item, go around the room or circle, depending on how you assembled the group, to see if she can find the person who has the same item or the other half of the item as her. Give everyone a turn. After a while, the person with the other matching item will have a turn. This is especially good for low functioning residents because there is more opportunity for success. Give hints, encouragement and plenty of positive feedback. Ask how the items feel and what you might use the item for.
The other way to play the game is to give each participant a different item. Have the other matching items in a bag. After everyone has an item, have each person pick out an item from the bag. Let her see if she can find the participant who has the match to what she has picked out. Again hints encouragement and cheering make this game a lot of fun. To add a feel sensory element, you or the participant describe the item by talking about the way the item looks or feels.
As you can see, this game can be adapted to many occasions or it could just be an any day activity.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Easy basketball trivia


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great 
dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Eactmonster.com



  • James Naismith, a teacher at a YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts, is credited with inventing basketball in 1891.




  • The first “hoops” were actually just peach baskets and the first backboards were made of wire.



  • The game became an official Olympic event at the Summer Games in Berlin, Germany in 1936.



  • Two leagues called the National Basketball League (NBL) and the Basketball Association of America (BAA) merged after the 1948-49 season to become today's National Basketball Association (NBA)



  • The Boston Celtics have won the most NBA championships (17), including seven straight from 1960 to 1966.


  • Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who played 20 seasons in the NBA, holds the record for most points scored in a career with 38,387.




  • On March 2, 1962, Philadelphia center Wilt Chamberlain scored 100 points in one game against New York. That is the most one player has ever scored in one game.




  • Current Atlanta Hawks coach Lenny Wilkens has won more basketball games than any other coach.




  • The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a 10-team rival league to the NBA that began play in the 1967-68 season and folded nine years later after the 1975-76 season. Four current NBA teams – Indiana, Denver, New York, and San Antonio – originated in the ABA.




  • The NBA instituted the three-pointer before the 1979-80 season, an idea it borrowed from the ABA.




  • The Chicago Bulls have won all six NBA Finals in which they've appeared.




  • Michael Jordan, who retired in January 1999 but returned to the league in 2001, has scored more points (5,987) in the playoffs than any other player.




  • The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame is located in Springfield, Mass.





  • Friday, March 10, 2017

    How Daylight Savings Time Affects Those with Dementia

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

    First Light Home Care
    How Daylight Savings Time Effects Your Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease
    Posted by Gina Kaurich in Alzheimer's & Dementia Care, Caregiving, Health & Wellness
    Daylight Savings Time starts Sunday March 13.

    Read this for some insight as to how daylight savings time may affect your loved one or client with dementia
    It occurred to me as I sat at breakfast with my mother in law, Martha, who suffers with Alzheimer’s disease that she didn’t seem quite herself today.  That may sound strange to some of you but even as an individual is progressing through the dementia stages they do retain certain parts of their personality.  Now, sometimes the subtle changes can occur before an illness such as a urinary tract infection or even dehydration.  So I started this morning with running through the gamut of potential problems.  Beginning with the small things such as the lighting being adequate, is she warm enough, does she have her hearing aids in place and are they turned up so she can hear me.  I then moved on to what I call the intermediate of potential issues, such as did she take her medications last night and today, did she seem stuffy or congested this morning, had she had a bowel movement yesterday, or did her unusually quiet behavior reflect something else.  She seemed tired and when she asked what time it was, it hit me; last night was the shift to Daylight Savings Time.
    Now you would not expect this to create any problems for someone who is not cognitively aware of the time of day any longer; but just like a baby or child, the individual with Alzheimer’s has a sense something is different.  We did not necessarily get her up an hour earlier or make any changes to her routine but she sensed a change.  She asked repeatedly during the day what time it was and finally said she felt tired today.  There are times when she is such a “hoot”!  Her surprised reaction when we told her the time was, “Oh my, how could I have slept so long.”  And when we all laugh, she laughs and enjoys herself right along with the rest of us, it is wonderful.  I love to see her have those happy moments.
    Meals were the epicenter of her confusion with Day Light Savings time; she just couldn’t believe it was time to eat again.  This made us all laugh again since Martha is a very tiny woman who weighs about 98 pounds but eats constantly.  Around our house we have candy dishes filled with her favorite “Hershey Kisses” along with bowls of unsalted pecans, almonds and fruit.  Needless to say, she does not go hungry.  However, today her eating pattern has shifted and instead of eating all of those treats between meals, she is eating them about an hour later.  Our grandchildren came over and she helped fix tacos, salad and brownies for dinner and guess who ate her weight in brownies?  It is wonderful to watch how animated she becomes when around children.  You can see she is back to raising her daughter and five boys; her old behaviors to keep them busy kick in.
    Once dinner was over and as the sun went down she began to become restless and uncomfortable; not unusual for most people with dementia.  Martha rubs her hands together when she is unsettled which helps by giving us an indicator to her state of mind.  Her bright blue eyes begin to fade.  She asks my husband to take her home which we finally figured out to mean Tennessee, where she grew up with “Momma and Daddy”.  Then she wants to know if the lady of the house cares if she goes to bed.  She and I walk together upstairs to begin her bedtime routine and she says to me that she is so tired and the day has gone by so fast.  I agree and to some degree am always surprised at how much she continues to teach me every day about those living with dementia.

    Tuesday, March 7, 2017

    Cinco de Mayo for those with dementia

    Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





    Cinco de Mayo is another opportunity to have a celebration and to create moments of joy for those with dementia

    Start by getting a picture book like the one shown above. Have a discussion about Cinco de Mayo. There is information on the May page Make up some trivia questions using the information

    Make some easy Mexican dishes such as tacos, tortilla chips and salsa, or refried beans. Or you can be adventurous and make something in the cook book below

    Do not forget the Mexican music. You can play it as you are cooking

    Top the celebration off with an arm chair trip to Mexico

    Sunday, March 5, 2017

    Limericks for those with dementia (Part 2)


    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here are some limerick suggestions


    The first two are baseball limericks

    Baseball

    If pitching a shutout is one of your goals
    Show batters your pinpoint ______
    Finesse them ________
    But whatever you do
    Don’t hang a curveball _______


    Baseball Caps

    Baseball caps are meant for _______
    When after fly balls you're _______.
    But worn ______
    Only by ________
    And those who lack an _________.

    There once was a pauper named Meg
    Who accidentally broke her _______.
    She slipped on the ______.
    Not once, but ______
    Take no pity on her, I __________.

    The artist who's working in wood
    Must be certain her handtools are ____
    For if those knives be ____
    It's certain she'll ____
    Over blood spilled for her ______.

    Describe a librarian's day?
    Peaceful and quiet, you___
    There is one thing it ____
    Back there in the stacks____
    And that thing is more decent ____.

    The secret of love is the power
    To weather the sweet and the _____
    Your joy will not _____
    With love as your ______
    Through sunshine and through _______.

    Friday, March 3, 2017

    Lets laugh with someone who has dementia


    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Laughter is the best medicine

    Here is a mind stimulating activity about limericks

    What are limericks and how can people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias write them?

    A limerick is meant to be funny. Therefore they are sure to bring a smile to the faces of the folks with or without dementia in your audience.

    Limeriks are five-line poems where lines 1,2 and 5 rhyme, and lines 3 and 4 rhyme. It is said that the limerick was invented by soldiers returning from France to the Irish town of Limerick in the 1700’s.

    In order to make this a successful activity, you may have to have most of the limerick written except for the last word in the sentence.

    You can think of rhyming words with the group members after you read the unfinished limerick to them.

    Why do this activity? You ask

    It is a fun way to stimulate the mind and have a good laugh

    Come back tomrrow for a senerio of this

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017

    Activities for dementia care: unlocking what remains; Observing Montessori-based principles in action at an Alzheimer's unit

    Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


    I found this article. It shares some useful information
    BNET
    Healthcare Industry

    As the rapidly falling snow swirls and blows around the courtyard outside the activities room at Menorah Park Center for Senior Living in Beachwood, Ohio, the atmosphere inside is warm and inviting on this cold December day. The weather outside might be frightful, but in here, there's a party going on
    Rose is sorting small, colorful pom-poms and placing them into the painted compartments of an ice-cube tray that match them. Milton is hard at work with a screwdriver, concentrating on driving screws into four holes that have been drilled in a smooth piece of wood, while Sadie places pegs of graduated sizes into their respective holes in a long wooden block.
    Madeline, the most verbally expressive member of this group of residents, is adeptly--and with noticeable pride--sorting a large container of brightly colored, plastic alphabet letters into piles. Besides being pleased by her accomplishment, she also enjoys the fact that she's doing a mitzvah--an act of helping someone else. She is sorting the letters to be used in an activity other residents will enjoy later.
    Another woman is putting together simple two-piece puzzles made from magazine photos that have been cut out and laminated.