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Saturday, June 27, 2009

Poems offering support for those with Alzheimer's disease

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, here is an article in Denver Daily News that might interest you

by Gene Davis, DDN Staff Writer

Beyond Forgetting
Poetry and prose about Alzheimer's disease

Anyone who has a loved one suffering from a debilitating disease needs all the support they can get, and a new collection of poems is doing what it can to provide companionship to people who are losing someone to Alzheimer’s disease.

“Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer’s disease” is a collection of selected poetry and prose from 100 writers who encountered Alzheimer’s disease firsthand. With Alzheimer’s disease becoming increasingly prevalent, there are more people than ever who need the support of knowing that they are not alone in their experiences, said Holly Hughes, the editor of “Beyond Forgetting.”

“I think poetry is really important to witness these difficult passages and help us through them,” she said. “Whenever I found poems, I felt very supported by somebody’s experiences and I wanted to do the same for other people.”

Hughes wrote numerous poems while losing her mother to Alzheimer’s disease in 2001. When reading some of the Alzheimer’s-related poems out in public, there would always be a few people who wanted a copy because they knew someone with the disease.

“During that time period, writing poetry was what kept........read more about Beyond Forgetting

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Massage and Alzheimer's Disease: What would Maslow say?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, here is an interesting article from
MassageToday.com

By Ann Catlin, LMT, NCTMB, OTR

It has been said that in 25 years, the United States will have two kinds of people: those who have Alzheimer's disease and those who are caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease. Dementia is a term meaning loss of memory and other intellectual abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia.

As a licensed massage therapist and Compassionate Touch practitioner, I have witnessed the transformation that can occur when intentional touch is offered, enhancing quality of life of individuals living with Alzheimer's disease.

For example:

The woman, withdrawn and thought to be non-verbal, who looked me in the eye and said "thank you" following a hand massage.


The gentleman whose agitation was calmed with a simple back rub allowing the nurse's assistant to help him get dressed without the usual struggle.


The activities director who said to me, "She has been here for several months, but when I gave her a hand massage, I felt like I really got to know her for the first time!"
So what is at the heart of these seemingly magical moments? There is clearly something profound happening that goes well beyond simple touch. We can explore the relationship between human needs and well-being to gain a greater understanding of how deep our touch truly goes.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Abraham Maslow (1908-1970) was an......read the whole article

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities,

Monday, June 22, 2009

More about smiling and dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, here is some valuable information from the book, Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones, and Involved Professionals, a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals



Here are questions for a discussion about the baby

If your dementia residents do not respond well to questions, then simply say
Lets have a discussion about
instead of the question format

Our baby likes to look at bright, colorful toys when he wakes up.
Where is the baby?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is in his crib. Do you see him there?

What time do you think this baby wakes up in the morning?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he wakes up at 6am. What do you think?
Have a discussion about the best time to get up. Also, talk about why babies get up so early.
Then ask: What time do you wake up in the morning?

What is the baby doing?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is looking at his toys. What do you think?

Let’s name some toys.
If prompting is needed, say something like:
Is a truck a toy? There are many toys that could be named.
You can have a discussion about which toys are for boys, girls, or both.
You could have some pictures of toys or even have toys for group members to see and touch.

What color toys do you see?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I see a red toy. Do you? What other color toys do you see?

Color ideas--

Get more information about this dementia book

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

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Saturday, June 20, 2009

Baby pictures make those with dementia smile



Isn't this a cute baby picture?
There are 13 more in the book,Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones, and Involved Professionals, a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Besides making folks with dementia smile, there are conversation stimulators which help to maintaining the remaining cognitive functions of a person with dementia

This dementia book is a must have for anyone working or living with a person with dementia.

Come back tomorrow for a sample of conversation stimulators related to this picture

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities,

Friday, June 19, 2009

Bring a teddy bear to an Alzheimer’s patient

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, read this

TERRE HAUTE — With Alzheimer’s disease, a person can lose their intellectual, social and emotional abilities over time. Research has found that dolls and teddy bears can help people with Alzheimer’s disease interact and communicate with others. Teddy bears have been known to stimulate memories and improve communications with others and overall improves the quality of life for the Alzheimer patient and their families.

The Teddy Bear Picnic was created to provide the opportunity for our community to be heroes and enhance the quality of life for those afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease.

The general public is invited to a picnic complete with refreshments from 2 to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the following locations:

n Southwood Health and Rehabilitation, 2222 Margaret Ave.

n Terre Haute Nursing and Rehabilitation, 830 S. Sixth St.

n Wyndmoor Retirement, 1465 E. Crossing Blvd.

n Bethesda Gardens, 1450 E. Crossing Blvd.

n Cobblestone Crossing Health Campus, 1850 E. Howard Wayne Drive

n McMillan Adult Day Service, 486 First Ave.

n Royal Oaks Health and Rehabilitation, 3500 Maple Ave.

n Vermillion Convalescent Center, 1705 S. Main St., Clinton

It is requested visitors bring a teddy bear as a gift for an Alzheimer’s patient.

Come bring an.............Alzheimer's gift

Buy the Alzheimer's book

caregiver< information

An interesting dementia activity

Thursday, June 18, 2009

The Power of Your Music Muscles

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is an article of interest by A Jom

Caring for a person with Parkinson’s disease or dementia can be fraught with challenges, but there are ways of making life and rehabilitation not only more enjoyable, but possible more effective. A growing body of research suggests that music, and other creative forms of therapy, can enrich the lives of people with Parkinson’s and dementia.

remember my father’s expression when he received the phone call. His sister was in hospital, seriously wounded and in a coma. My aunt had had a nasty fall while she was hanging up the washing. She used to be a dressmaker, but the last couple of years she had been unable to button up her blouse. Her nimble fingers that used to produce the most beautiful garments were constantly shaking and trembling.

Caring for a person with Parkinson’s disease or dementia can be fraught with challenges, but there are ways of making life and rehabilitation not only more enjoyable, but possible more effective. So how do we help create a better life for people when their movements and cognitive functions are seriously affected and in decline?

My father is a music lover, and he spent hours escaping into the world of divine sounds after the phone call. Music is capable of transpiring us to the height and depth of emotion, and now scientists are beginning to understand how music can have such a dramatic effect on our minds. A growing body of research suggests that music, and other creative forms of therapy, can enrich the lives of people with Parkinson’s and dementia.

Music can bring dreamy feelings, uplift, and even nurse you back to health. The power of music to enhance our lives begins even before birth. The fetus hears music, and a year after they are born, children recognize and prefer music the heard in the womb.

Research by Norman Doidge suggests that the adult brain is capable of change and growth; it can produce new and modified connections, and even new neurons. The brain is plastic and elastic and it can alter its structure and find a new way to function. Research has shown that melody and rhythm can sometimes activate neurological abilities that have been lost to disease or damaged.

We often tap out toes or bob our heads in time with music, even babies might have a sense of rhythm (recent research by Istv├ín Winkler and Henkjan Honing). One of the characteristics of Parkinson’s disease is that movements are often too fast or too slow. Focusing on the rhythm and trying to feel its pulse can help people with Parkinson’s walk better and perform consecutive tasks where previously they froze. Music speeds up and slows down and our cerebellum, the little brain, adjusts itself to stay synchronized. Music for people suffering from Parkinson’s should have a firm rhythmic character, but it need not be familiar. The rhythm is the most important.

Parkinson’s isn’t something that is always dark, there are light and memorable moments. Singing may help when speech becomes slurred and unclear due to poor breath support, or as a result of difficulties with the motor aspects of speech.

Memory loss is one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Unbelievable as it might sound, people affected by dementia.........read more about music muscles

A dementia book for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia activities and articles,

Sunday, June 14, 2009

“Preventive gerontologist” specializes in preventing memory loss

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is an article of interest.

By TONY CASTRO
Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES | If a picture is worth a thousand words, Arnold Bresky believes a painting is worth a million memories.

Bresky, a physician who calls himself a “preventive gerontologist,” has been using art therapy in working with Alzheimer’s and dementia patients — and he claims a 70 percent success rate in improving their memories.

“I have 96-year-old people who get better,” says Bresky, 69, who said he believed that encouraging Alzheimer’s and dementia patients to draw and paint exercised their brains and turns back the clock on their memory loss.

“I have patients ... learning to draw and paint for the first time in their lives, and their quality of life improves.”

The work of some of those patients recently was on display at City Hall in Los Angeles as part of Brain Health Month, and Councilman Dennis Zine recognized Bresky with a proclamation.

Patients like octogenarian Yolanda Wood of Camarillo, Calif., swear by Bresky’s program, which is covered by Medicare.

“I’ve been a patient of his for years, and I do his art therapy program all the time,” Wood said. “I’m always drawing, and it’s helped me. It’s even helped me pass my driver’s license test.”

Last spring, Wood was notified by the state’s Department of Motor Vehicles that, because of her age, she would have to retake her driving examination.

“I went to Dr. Bresky and I said, ‘Am I going to be able to do this?’ And he said, ‘Of course,’ and we went to work on learning all the driving laws. When I took the test, I made a perfect 100.”

“She’s a better driver now,” said Bresky, “and it’s because of my program.”

Bresky, who gave up his obstetrics practice 12 years ago to work on preventing memory loss, calls his program a “Brain Tune Up,” and includes a multidisciplinary approach that also includes the use of music.

“My program improves the memory function to enhance a person’s quality of life,” he said.

Bresky teaches his program to caregivers and nursing students at California State University, Northridge; Pierce College; and through his book “Brain Tune Up: The Secret for Caregiver Success,” published last year.

At the Sunrise Senior Living facility in Woodland Hills, Calif., Bresky on recently introduced his program to eight residents who had never worked with him before. He got remarkable results in getting them each to draw the face of a person by copying lines and patterns from one sheet of paper to a grid on another sheet.

The results were cubist-like renditions of faces.

By the end of the session, the octogenarian residents of the facility were animated and eager to discuss what they had just done.

“It got me concentrating, and I like that,” Molly Morgan said.

“The more I did this, the more I enjoyed it,” Irene Kowalski said.

The program gets people, especially those who are older and suffering from memory problems, exercising their brains. Bresky said.

“The brain works through numbers and patterns,” he said. “The numbers are on the left side of your brain, the patterns are on the right side. What I’m doing is connecting the two sides.

“And we’re getting the brain to grow new cells. It’s called.........read more of preventing memory loss

Here is a great resource dementia for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementiaarticles and activities,

Saturday, June 13, 2009

Where To Live As We Age

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,this sounds good in theory. What do you think?
from
Parade

by Susan Fine

Christine Cleary, 91, puts down her crochet work as she happily describes her new residence in Cohoes, a suburb of Albany, N.Y. "It doesn't smell like a nursing home," she says appreciatively. "There's no disinfectant odor." Cleary also enjoys how much quieter it is than most nursing homes--no beeping machines and clattering carts.

Cleary lives with 11 other elderly people in a Green House home, a comfortable residence that offers meals, support, and nursing care at a cost comparable to that of a private room at a large, impersonal home. Each person has his or her own room and bath around a sunny living area with a big dining table that can accommodate all of the residents. An open kitchen allows seniors to put in their two cents about meal preparation, and they have easy access to a garden and patio.

Residential eldercare is a big business today. Nearly 1.4 million seniors live in nursing homes in the United States. But in 18 towns and cities from Birmingham, Ala., to Winthrop, Wash., a new model of care is being tested. While these Green House homes may not soon replace the 16,000 nursing homes in the U.S., they're changing the way our nation cares for its oldest citizens.

Geriatrician Dr. Bill Thomas, a professor at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, created The Green House Project with the hope of revolutionizing eldercare. In 2001, he wandered into the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation wearing a sweatshirt and Birkenstocks and shared his vision. The foundation was so impressed by his ideas it agreed to support a pilot program. With the foundation's help, Dr. Thomas eventually partnered with NCB Capital Impact, a national nonprofit organization that offers assistance to underserved communities, to roll out a plan. Two years later, the first Green House homes were constructed in Tupelo, Miss.

The success of the Green House model lies in.......read more

Here is a great resource dementia for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities,

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Nursing Home Activities Ideas

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is something you may find interesting by
lovetoknow

by katep

Types of Activities
Activities can either be self-directed or operate in conjunction with volunteers.

Self-Directed Activity Ideas
There are a number of self-directed activities that can take place within a nursing home. They can be informal arrangements between residents or a more structured program can be developed. Ideas include:

Celebrating birthdays – Organize parties including making cards, baking and decorating cakes.
Musical events – Sing-a-longs, mini shows or even guest events are always welcome.
Gardening – Gardening need not mean strenuous outside activities. Window gardening, small herb gardens planted in plant pots and hanging baskets are all accessible hobbies.
Activities Involving Volunteers
In addition to self-directed activities, other programs can be introduced that involve volunteers and other members of the community. Inviting outside community members into a nursing home is important and there are many willing volunteers who would like to participate in events and projects.

Interaction With Young People
Many residents of nursing homes have limited contact with young people. Perhaps grandchildren live a long distance away or have their own busy lives and cannot visit. Consequently, many youngsters have limited contact with seniors. Encouraging schools, youth groups, young people´s church groups and other organizations to visit nursing homes offers multiple benefits to both demographics.

When young people visit nursing homes there are a number of activities that can take place. These include:

Telling of stories. This encompasses many different things. Of course, young people can read to residents of nursing homes. However, an interesting alternative would be for the seniors to tell their own story to the youngsters. Many children are fascinated by the history and are amazed that there was life before Gameboys and mp3 players. Therefore, hearing stories of life after a war, watching a television for the first time, the advances of technology and so on are eagerly received by children. Every person has a different story to share and these precious personal histories deserve retelling.

Crafts: While many residents of nursing homes make crafts for charities and good causes, another variation of this is for residents to teach youngsters how to knit or crochet. There is a huge resurgence in needlecrafts and yet many youngsters do not know how to knit or crochet and parents are often too busy to teach them. Offering an activity whereby residents teach youngsters crafts gives a huge amount of pleasure to both parties. Working with children is a stimulating and rewarding activity for residents.

Musical events: Youngsters will often be delighted to put on a show for residents. An alternative musical activity would be for residents to teach the children songs and tunes that were popular in the past. Again, this can be very rewarding and great fun to do.

Activities with Adult Volunteers
There are many activities that adult volunteers can run in nursing homes. The staff in nursing homes often welcome volunteers to run activity programs, as they are too busy with the day-to-day nursing aspects of operating the facility. Volunteers might be from a charitable organization, a local community group or simply individuals looking to get more involved.

Groups of volunteers can run different activities than individuals. For instance, a group of people can chaperone and organize day trips or outings, whereas individuals can offer more personal activities such as reading to people, personal shopping services, spa treatments, or simply be someone to talk to.

Tips for Successful Nursing Home Activities Ideas........read the whole thing

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Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Picture cards help families chat to elderly and those with dementia

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is something from Times Online that might interest you

Melanie Reid

The simplest of inventions, dreamt up at a kitchen table, is helping to transform communication between elderly people and their carers and families.

Sets of large cards, carrying pictures of well-known scenes and objects from the 1940s, are being used to stimulate old people and those with dementia and to support conversations between the generations.

“Reminiscence tea parties” are being organised at which the cards are used as a tool to draw the elderly out of their shells and to get them talking about their lives — and carers are reporting increased wellbeing as a result.

In the six months since the cards were launched they have sold out two print runs and have been eagerly adopted by volunteers and in care homes across the UK. Another series of cards, featuring the 1950s, is to be launched within the next month

The cards are the brainchild of Sarah Reed, a trustee with the charity Contact the Elderly. Through her volunteering, she saw carers and families struggling to find things to talk about with the elderly or those with dementia.

“My mother has dementia, and I understood how difficult it could be to make conversation with her. But also, through my work with Contact the Elderly, we saw younger people in particular who clearly wanted to have a relationship with older people but didn’t know where to begin.

“Even with families, it’s difficult. People go into care homes to visit loved ones but don’t know how to start a conversation. They struggle to get going.

“The cards give everyone somewhere to go: they allow old people to......read the whole article

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here


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Monday, June 8, 2009

Take Precautions for Facility Outing?

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is some important information about outings
NCCDP Newsletter
By: Sandra Stimson CALA, ADC, CDP, CDCM
Residents diagnosed with dementia and or who live on a dementia unit may go on supervised outings. But the team needs to put thought and planning for facility trips. As a general rule, anyone that the team feels is not a flight risk should attend outings. As long as there is appropriate staffing to provide supervision, observation and monitoring at all times. Only take the number of residents that can be safely monitored.
On all trips there should be an activity assistant, nursing assistant and a bus driver. Or two activity assistants and a nursing assistant. A nursing assistant should accompany all residents as they are trained in areas of ADL’s. Additionally, if you have only one activity assistant and a resident has to go to the rest room, who will be left to monitor the residents? Administrators and Director’s of Nursing must make it a policy to have appropriate supervision when resident’s have a diagnosis of dementia are on facility outings. The facility is leaving themselves open for possible accidents, elopements, fines and law suits should anything happen
But what if the person is a flight risk? Flight risk may be anyone who is ambulatory or in wheel chair or motorized cart who has wandered away before. But be aware that a dementia resident who wanders away may never have wandered away from a controlled area before. Staff must be alert to this possibility at all times. Plan for it, Expect it.
The team for the dementia unit must meet and decide as a team what the safety issues are, how you will meet those safety issues and which staff will provide the monitoring and observations. The team should make the decision on which residents will attend facility outings. This should not be a decision made by the activity staff. Obviously, anyone who is a flight risk must have one on one staff supervision at all times.
At times you have families who insist that their loved one attend a resident outing. However, safety must come first. If you are not prepared to take this resident on an outing due to inadequate staffing, supervision and monitoring concerns than you must explain to the family. You might ask the family member or responsible party if they would like to attend the trip and assist with their loved one. Many people have no concept of how hard a trip is and what is involved in a trip. It may be one of the hardest and most exhausting of activities.

Pick the location well, as if a life depends on it. The Activity Director should visit the location prior to the trip to access the environment, crowds, bathroom facilities, parking lot and number of exits for the location. Smaller venues are recommended such as;
Small diners
Small pet shops
Small stores
Small stores such as five and dime vs. a large shopping mall.
Drive to a resident’s old neighborhood
Small zoo
Ice cream parlors
Garden center
Plan your time well. Probably the best time to go on an outing is 10:00 A.M. and return by lunch time. A long trip is probably not recommended as they tire easily. There are times through out the year that you may want to take residents on trips where they do not leave the van such as viewing holiday lights or observing fall foliage. Keep in mind the weather and dress the residents accordingly.

Always communicate for success. Let the residents know where you are going. When you get off the bus, let the residents know what they will be doing. When they return, state to the residents,

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here


For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here


For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here

Friday, June 5, 2009

Turning inspiring words into exciting decor with removable lettering

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, here is an article that may interest you.

By CONNIE OLIVER
The Canadian Press

As a writer, I know that words can inspire, comfort and heal and I've always loved having important quotes and words as part of my decor.

Up until now, I have been using wooden lettering that I'd painted and displayed around the home. While I love the effect, it is cumbersome and limited to the lettering available.

A Canadian company called Walltalk opens up a whole new arena.

The Walltalk products are graphic precut, pre-spaced, removable lettering on a roll that you simply transfer to your walls, windows, mirrors, accessories and even your vehicle.

This easy decorating application is quick and inexpensive and can change the look of your decor.

Gone are the days of stencilling your favourite sayings onto the walls, which was time-consuming and limited to what size and font of stencils were available.

The Walltalk Company Inc. is located in a farmhouse in Grand Valley, Ont., a farming community north of Toronto.

This company, owned by Ronda Pegnam, has grown from a kitchen-table operation to a booming business that provides product to more than 1,100 retailers in North America.

The farmhouse sat ready to be rented on the property adjacent to Pegnam's country home that she shares with her partner, Tom.

Once her business grew too big to be run from her home, she decided to move it next door to the farmhouse. It needed some TLC, so she and her friends and staff spent a weekend painting and sprucing up the space and Pegnam says that it's funky and more conducive to creativity.

Walltalk has many product lines that include Baby Talk, Lipstick (for girlfriends), Graphically Speaking, Blessings, Signature Series and even a French line of products.

They are always working on new ideas for additional product lines so their product remains fresh and relevant.

What great gifts for a friend in need rather than just an inspirational card. It would be a lovely sentiment that would comfort and inspire the recipient for years to come.

I can see these given as gifts to someone battling breast cancer or to someone in a hospice or nursing home to......read the whole article

You and your loved one or clients with dementia can design something similar to this on your own

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here


For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here


For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here

Thursday, June 4, 2009

Father's day gifts for those with dementia

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers whether you make a gift for a loved one or client with dementia, or not, you want to give a gift that will keep on giving

If you have a group, you can design and have the women give the men gifts or you can have the woman with dementia make a gift or card for her husband, son or friend who comes to visit

For ideas go here
Just substitute the word husband or a friend's name for thr word dad

Here are some other ideas- but before you read them

remember
Finding the right gift for the man with dementia this Father's Day is easy. There are many wonderful items you can buy or make that will make the time you spend together meaningful.

Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals". This book features baby photographs that men with dementia will love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you, the gift-giver. Men with dementia do love babies.

Another gift a dementia dad will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD. He will enjoy watching something from the good old days and singing the songs played throughout the picture. Here are a few suggestions: Top Hat, Swing Time, Follow the Fleet, or Shall We Dance.

Next is a sing a long CD or audio cassette of his favorite songs. One with Mitch Miller is a wonderful choice. You may want to get a sing a long video where loved ones can see and hear performers singing songs they love. A good seies is the Sing Along with Frank Woehrle series.

Here is another idea. Give him hand lotion, a manly scent, of course. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he might have. Give him a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels and maybe about the good old days, as well. Yes, men love hand massages

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit, he will appreciate your company even though he may not be able to express it. Take him for a walk. Sing some favorite songs together. Give him a hand massage. Just share some quality time with him. You will both feel better.

Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting. No arguing, please.

These gifts are simple, inexpensive or free, and can be enjoyed by all.

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here


For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here


For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here