Friday, March 30, 2018

HomeMille Lacs MessengerCommunityFeatures Progress: A community of caring - Mille Lacs Health System Long Term Care

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

I thought you might be interested in this

There is now a monthly newsletter (on the mlhealth.org website) with a calendar that shows just how many activities there are to participate in at this nursing home. Among the events during the year: an antique car show, a Christmas mini-mall, regular baking, visits from local schoolchildren, a farm ...




There is much talk in the news lately about residential nursing facilities (nursing homes) for seniors, much of it not good. With nearly 20,000 nursing homes in the United States caring for approximately 1.6 million residents – a number that is predicted to quadruple to 6.6 million by 2050 – reports of abuse and neglect are on the rise. It’s no wonder families struggle with eldercare choices.

But if you visit Mille Lacs Health System Long Term Care, you will see signs in the hallways that remind employees:
That idea is the foundation for how people are cared for here.
On a late winter day, MLHS Activities Aide Bernie Woitalla is leading a spirited morning word-find game with a large circle of residents. Brad Opager, also from the Activities Department, later reads the paper to a group which is discussing current affairs. Nursing assistant Maranda Boser, helping to wheel a resident down to the communal dining room, stops to enjoy a colorful finch in the large bird aviary with her. The respect and caring for the residents at MLHS Long Term Care is something you can feel, just walking down the halls or peeking into the dining commons area where floor-to-vaulted-ceiling windows let in plenty of sunshine.
When MLHS Activities Director Amber Sjodin joined the team, the already energetic Activities Department became buoyant with even more ways to help the residents engage with others and keep stimulated. There is now a monthly newsletter (on the mlhealth.orgwebsite) with a calendar that shows just how many activities there are to participate in at this nursing home.
Among the events during the year: an antique car show, a Christmas mini-mall, regular baking, visits from local schoolchildren, a farm animals day, State Fair day, a spelling bee, a Father’s Day BBQ, fundraising activities for the Family Council and art projects. The residents are also treated to regular visits by local musicians and music/dancing groups from the schools and community.
The local community’s contributions to the facility are much appreciated. The Onamia Lions and the local quilters club donate gifts, and an anonymous donor gave $2,000 to develop a state-of-the-art music program for the MLHS Memory Care Unit, which will lessen the anxiety that accompanies Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.
Staff at MLHS also get involved, donating Christmas gifts to the residents at the holidays, as well as participating in the Silly Fashion Show, a festive sweater contest and the annual Halloween costume contest.
The 15-member family council brought the idea of a family room to reality, which was created as a cozy place for families to congregate for birthdays, reunions or other kinds of get-togethers. It has even been utilized for end-of-life gatherings.
The IN2L (It’s Never Too Late) computer and wall monitor get lots of use in the facility’s communal space. IN2L is a picture-based touch-screen that features education, games, spiritual content, virtual travel, e-mail, web cams, era-specific music and movies.
A new Long Term Care Rest and Relax program is being developed in the MLHS Memory Care Unit to help decrease “sundowning” (where confusion and agitation seem to get worse in the late afternoon and evening).
Kathy Kleen, R.N. and LTC Director of Nursing, says, “We realize not everybody is a joiner, and that’s okay. So we do a lot of one-to-one programming, too. Caring for body, mind and spirit using an individualized approach is our goal.”
“I supervise Minneapolis HCMC Family Medicine residents in who spend a few weeks with me here at MLHS,” says MLHS staff physician Tom Bracken. “They have an opportunity to visit MLHS Long Term Care, and invariably they are very surprised at the warm and caring atmosphere of our facility compared to those they visit in the metro area. The last resident said to me, ‘This seems like a home, not a nursing home.’”
“We really are a community within a community here,” says Kathy Kleen, who believes in strong leadership and ongoing education for staff members. “And I’m proud of the longevity of some of our staff. It helps with stability and continuity.”
In the MLHS Memeory Care Unit, employees talking gently with residents who are staring out the windows at the beauty of Lake Onamia demonstrate the commitment to the idea that the people who reside here should be respected and cared for as if they were “your own.”
It adds up to a place that really is dedicated to making sure the residents feel it is their home. And if home is where the heart is, there is a whole lot of heart here.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

April is Occupational Therapy Month

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

ehow

According to an article in “Age and Ageing” from 2004 in volume 33, pages 453-460, “occupational therapy interventions for elderly people in the community results in positive outcomes.” Nearly one-third of occupational therapists (OTR) and certified occupational therapy assistants (COTA) work with the geriatric population. They do a lot of types of treatments and activities, using many strategies. The main goal of helping those in the geriatric population is for them to regain or maintain the highest level of independence possible. It is the hope of most elderly people to stay in their homes as long as possible.

Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy commits to improving and maintaining the highest level of function possible of its clients so that people can have healthier, more productive and satisfying lives. Occupational therapy dedicates itself to quality health care which includes disease prevention, staying well and rehabilitation services for individuals across the lifespan. As people age, they use more occupational therapy services as a rule.

Effectiveness

Occupational therapy has been proven effective for the geriatric population, with a number of medical conditions and surgical recoveries. Besides working with individual people to increase their strength and regain important life skills, occupational therapists work with a geriatric community to counsel families, local governments and community groups to make sure that each group is doing its part to help older adults maintain their independence.

Conditions

The most common diseases, conditions and surgical recoveries that OTRs and COTAs are involved in for the elderly include: arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, broken shoulder, wrist, hip and knee replacement as well as repair or replacement of these body parts, depression, diabetes, sensory impairments and dementia. The key in geriatric care is to avoid these injuries and illnesses to begin with. To do this, OTRs and COTAs focus on adapting and modifying the performance of activities of daily living that have become difficult or impossible to do because of age-related changes, disorders or disabilities. Occupational therapy provides help with other activities that relate to geriatric clients that still work. They also find ways for elderly patients to be involved in leisure and social activities that are dependent upon the patient's capabilities and interests.

Settings
It is the aim of occupational therapy to improve the ability of elderly people so they can stay in their home. If institutionalized care is required, occupational therapy can enhance their lives there by helping them to maintain their highest level of function there, even if full recovery from a health issue is not possible.

Activities Of Daily Living

Occupational therapy focuses on ADLs because they are necessary for independent living. The basic ADLs include: going to the bathroom, bathing, grooming, dressing, eating and moving from one surface to another, such as moving from a chair to a bed or bathtub. Instrumental ADLs require more complex thinking. These tasks include things like preparing meals, using the telephone, operating a computer, managing finances and medications as well as cleaning; doing laundry, going shopping, and other errands, traveling from one place to another, which includes driving. Driving is quite complicated because it includes integration of visual, physical and mental tasks and being able to coordinate these tasks, which may be mild to moderately impaired as you age. Occupational therapy may help geriatric clients with other activities to help reduce the risks of social isolation and its detrimental consequences. They do this by assisting geriatric patients to maintain social activities they know and encouraging involvement in new ones as well as providing ways to promote continued learning and other mind-stimulating activities, which help promote feelings of self-worth and may help prevent dementia.

Monday, March 26, 2018

Cinco de Mayo for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





Cinco de Mayo is another opportunity to have a celebration and to create moments of joy for those with dementia

Start by getting a picture book like the one shown above. Have a discussion about Cinco de Mayo. There is information on the May page Make up some trivia questions using the information

Make some easy Mexican dishes such as tacos, tortilla chips and salsa, or refried beans. Or you can be adventurous and make something in the cook book below

Do not forget the Mexican music. You can play it as you are cooking

Top the celebration off with an arm chair trip to Mexico

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Celebrating Lei Day with those who have dementia

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers
May 1 is May Day but in Hawaii it is Lei Day.

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Lei day is May 1st and is celebrated in Hawaii.
It is so much fun to celebrate that yoou can celebrate it too  by making leis

Lei Day has an easy to do craft for those with dementia. The craft is making leis.

There is something for someone with almost every level of dementia, to do.

First you need to have strips of approximately 1×10 inches of paper. However the demensions are far from exact. I like to use tissue paper, but any thin paper or material will do.

Therefore, you can have one group making long strips of paper. This is a good activity for a lower functioning group. If group members have trouble making the strips then…..


Come back soon to find out this and more

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Coin Trivia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are some coin trivia questions

If these questions are too difficult, make up your own such as
Which president is on an older quarter?
Which coin is the biggest?
Which coin is worth the most money?

If these questions are too difficult, then use questions
giving a choice of two answers, such as:
Which coin is worth 10 cents, the quarter or the dime?

Hip\
Pocket
Change



Happy National Coin Week  National Coin Week was started to help people get to know about numismatics…the hobby and study of coins and paper money.
In 1983, President Reagan set aside the third week in April as a time for people to think about coins.  Why?  Because collecting coins can help you learn about science, history, and important people, places, and events.  Besides, lots of people find that collecting coins is just plain fun!

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Want to get leid?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

I bet this title got your attention. Well May 1 is May Day but in Hawaii it is Lei Day.

Lei Day has an easy to do craft for those with dementia. The craft is making leis.

There is something for someone with almost every level of dementia, to do.

First you need to have strips of approximately 1×10 inches of paper. However the demensions are far from exact. I like to use tissue paper, but any thin paper or material will do.

Therefore, you can have one group making long strips of paper. This is a good activity for a lower functioning group. If group members have trouble making the strips then…..

Come back tomorrow to find out this and more

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Easy Spring riddles trivia and facts

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Q.  What season is it when you are on a trampoline?
A.  Spring-time!
Q.  When do monkeys fall from the sky?
A.  During Ape-ril showers!
Q.  Can February March?
A.  No, but April May!
Q.  What flowers grow on faces?
A.  Tulips (Two-lips)!
Q.  Why is the letter A like a flower?
A.  A bee (B) comes after it!

Question 1:


What does the name 'Irish Spring' refer to?
A soap brand
An euphemism for bad breath
A holiday
An uprising in Ireland

Question 2:

View the provided image.
What is the nickname of musician Bruce Springsteen?
The Soldier
The Boss
Chairman of the Board
The Devil


View Image

Question 3:

View the provided image.
In which U.S. state is the city of Palm Springs located?
California
All of these
Texas
Hawaii


View Image

Question 4:


What kind of animal is the Springbok?
Frog
Antelope
Wild cat
Insect

Question 5:


'La primavera', or 'Spring', is Concerto No. 1, in E major which is part of 'The Four Seasons' violin concertos. Who composed "The Four Seasons"?
Giacomo Puccini
Antonio Vivaldi
Antonio Salieri
Gioachino Rossini

Question 6:

View the provided image.
In what country did the European Revolution of 1848, also known as the Spring of Nations, begin?
Italy
England
Russia
France


View Image

Question 7:

View the provided image.
'Primavera', or 'Spring', is a famous painting by which celebrated artist?
Michelangelo
Leonardo da Vinci
Sandro Botticelli
Titian


View Image

Question 8:

View the provided image.
What is the birth name of TV host and former politician Jerry Springer?
Jeremiah
Gerald
Joseph
George


View Image

Question 9:

View the provided image.
What is the name or the Roman goddess of spring?
Venus
Flora
Primavera
Aphrodite


View Image

Question 10:

View the provided image.
What breed is the dog in the picture?
American Springer Spaniel
French Springer Spaniel
.German Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel

Spring Facts

Spring is one of the four seasons.




  • The four seasons are Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer.
  • Spring comes after Winter and before Summer.
  • Spring is a symbol of rebirth.
  • When it is Spring in the Northern Hemisphere it is Autumn or Fall in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • The Northern Hemisphere is North of the Equator.  The US is in the Northern Hemisphere.
  • The Southern Hemisphere is South of the Equator.  Australia is located in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • Spring begins on March 21st or 22nd.
  • The first day of Spring is called the Vernal Equinox.
  • Vernal is Latin for Spring.
  • Equinox is Latin for Equal Days.
  • On the first day of Spring the sunrise and sunset are about 12 hours apart, everywhere on the Earth and the hours of daylight and night are almost equal. Daylight is a little longer.
  • The Vernal Equinox occurs when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is not facing towards or away from the sun.
  • On the Vernal Equinox the sun is directly above the equator. This also happens on the Autumnal Equinox in Fall around September 22nd.
  • What Happens During Spring?

    • During Spring the Earth’s axis start to tilt towards the sun.
    • The days get longer and warmer.
    • Many animals have babies such as cows, birds, ducks
    • Animals such as bears who hibernate start to wake up and become active.
    • During April you will see more rain showers.
    • During May the flowers will start to bloom.
    • That is where the saying April showers bring May flowers comes from.
    • Easter, Passover, April Fools Day, Earth Day, Arbor Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Cino De Mayo, Holi (festival of colors in India) are all holidays in Spring
    •  

  •  








    April Fool's Day

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

    Here is something you may want to display or hand out in celebration of April Fool's Day

                                    Join in the April Fools Day Fun
    In 16th Century France, the new year began on  April 1. 
    April Fools Day comes from this serious subject:
    the adoption of a new calendar.
     Use this info to fill out this week’s educational handout

    Friday, March 16, 2018

    An invitation to Passover: Traditional Seder is rich with readings, rituals and symbolic foods(part 2)

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities

    Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine


    By Julie Wiener
    Associated Press

    The basics

    All Seders include a few basic elements, such as kosher wine, matzo (unleavened bread), a Seder plate (a special plate that displays symbolic foods) and a reading of the Haggadah, the book that serves as a guide to the ceremony.

    Beyond that, family traditions generally dictate.

    Some families will dress formally and spend hours before the meal reading the Haggadah in Hebrew. Others are decidedly more casual, zip through the rituals in English and make the food the main event.

    Many families create their own Haggadah, incorporating contemporary readings. Those who use published Haggadahs have hundreds to choose from, including books that embrace vegetarianism, feminism and other causes.

    Some families conclude with dessert, while others continue into the night with singing, readings and prayers.

    Four questions

    Early in the Seder, the youngest participant typically will ask "The Four Questions." These are:

    r Why does one eat matzo? (To remember their ancestors, who fled Egypt in a hurry and did not have time to let their bread rise before the journey.)

    r Why does one eat bitter herbs? (A reminder of the bitterness of slavery.)

    r Why does one dip parsley in salt water (a symbol of the tears shed by slaves) and bitter herbs in charoseth, a sweet fruit paste (the texture evokes the mortar slaves used when making bricks)?

    r Why does one lean on a pillow or recline during the meal? (To symbolize the comforts of freedom.)

    Come back again for more

    Passover Seder (part 2)

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

    Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

    By Julie Wiener
    Associated Press

    The food

    Passover lasts eight days and begins with two nights of Seders. The menu varies greatly depending on a family's background. While many Ashkenazi Jews won't eat legumes, corn, rice, most other grains or products made from them, Sephardic Jews are more lenient. Ashkenazi Jews are descended from people who lived in Germany and Eastern European countries, while Sephardic Jews have roots in Spain and Portugal.

    Most Jews eschew "the five species of grains" — wheat, rye, oats, barley and spelt, all of which contain gluten.

    The exception is matzo, which is made from wheat, but has not been allowed to ferment. Matzo must be baked within 18 minutes of the flour being combined with water.

    Legumes also are forbidden, though Sephardic and Conservative Jews consume rice and legumes.

    So what is allowed? Fruit is always a safe bet, as are potatoes and other root vegetables, leafy greens, nuts, eggs, fish, dairy and meat (although, in accordance with kosher laws, meat and dairy must be served separately).

    If, like most American Jews, your hosts are of Ashkenazi descent, you are likely to start the meal with chicken-matzo ball soup, as well as gefilte fish (ground fish mixed with matzo meal, eggs and seasonings).

    Other Passover favorites include brisket, roast lamb and a variety of side dishes, such as potato kugel, tzimmes (sweet potatoes and carrots) and assorted casseroles bound together with eggs and matzo meal.

    For dessert, expect macaroons, fruit compote, candy and cakes and tortes made with ground nuts or other kosher-for-Passover flours. Beer and most other liquors are not allowed, but wine generally flows freely throughout the Seder.

    The rituals

    The Seder consists of 15 rituals, most of which occur before the meal is served. They include lighting candles, blessing wine, washing hands, breaking the matzo, dipping vegetables and telling the story of the Exodus from Egypt.

    Usually, one of the hosts serves as the leader, but guests take turns reading sections from the Haggadah.

    Interspersed are various traditional songs. Many Seders also feature contemporary readings on the themes of slavery and liberation.

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018

    An invitation to Passover: Traditional Seder is rich with readings, rituals and symbolic foods

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



    Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

    By Julie Wiener
    Associated Press

    The first time Abigail Auer attended a Passover Seder, she was eager to make a good impression and asked the hostess — also her future mother-in-law — to suggest a dish she could bring.

    Auer, who is Roman Catholic, spent hours chopping and pureeing squash for a casserole.

    As she spread on the bread-crumb topping, she asked her future husband and his roommate, both Jewish, "How come you can have bread crumbs, but not bread?"

    "Their faces just said, 'Oh no,'" recalled Auer. Her mother-in-law, who had provided the recipe, had forgotten it included a bread-crumb topping, which the family had always left off in adherence to kosher-for-Passover laws.

    When Auer's attempts to scrape off the bread crumbs failed, she left the casserole at home and brought flowers instead.

    For Passover novices, an invitation to a Seder can be exciting, and a bit intimidating.

    The most widely celebrated Jewish festival, Passover, which begins at sundown Saturday and is also known by its Hebrew name Pesach, commemorates the ancient Israelites' liberation from Egyptian slavery.

    At a Passover Seder, a celebratory meal, the story of the Exodus is retold through readings, rituals and symbolic foods.

    While some foods, such as matzo and bitter herbs, are required eating, others, including bread, are forbidden. Traditional Jews can't even store the taboo items in their homes or eat from dishes or cutlery that have touched them.

    To a newcomer, the numerous rules and traditions can be overwhelming. Even veteran Seder-goers can find them confusing, particularly since the diversity of American Jews results in many different ways of celebrating.

    Here's what you need to know: Come back for more info

    Monday, March 12, 2018

    Bible verses to celebrate Easter

    Acti
    vities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great
    dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


    If we knew nothing else of the Savior these two verses would teach us one of His greatest messages. That is, that no matter what the situation we must and we have the power to forgive and turn the other cheek.


    "He is not here: for he is risen ,..." Mathew 28:6. With this angelic declaration, we learn of the Savior's miraculous victory over death. As the first person ever to triumph over the grave he released all mankind from the terrible grasp of the grave, giving us the gift of immortality.

    Bible verses for Easter teach us that no matter how difficult our lives may seem, we have the ability to rise above and triumph over our trials. Jesus also suffered, but in His suffering He showed us a better way. The way in which we can reach a state of happiness that will allow us to follow in His path and change our lives and the lives of all those that we influence, for the better.

    Saturday, March 10, 2018

    Easter Gifts For Those With Dementia and Other Long Term Care Residents




    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



    Healthnews-stat.com


    Over 5.5 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or work with? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease an Easter gift that will keep on giving long after the holiday is gone.

    First on the list of gifts is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.

    Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a love classic musical video or DVD. They will enjoy watching something from the good old days and singing the songs played throughout the picture. Here are a few suggestions: Singin' in the Rain, Meet Me in St. Louis, or Shall We Dance

    Next is a sing a long CD or audio cassette of their favorite love songs. There is a series of these called, Old Time Favorites by Nancy Pitkin

    You may want to get a sing a long video where your loved one can see and hear performers singing songs they love and are about love. A good one is, Sing-Along with Phil Bernardi: Songs We Know and Love

    Here is another idea. Give a friend with dementia some hand lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he/she might have. If he/she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give him/her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels, how much you love this person, and an Easter experience you both share from the past.

    If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts before Easter, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit a dementia person, he/she will appreciate your company even though he/she may not be able to express it. Take him/her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or share some messages of love. Just spend some quality time with a dementia person. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting.

    A phone call or an Easter card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

    So no matter what you do, do not forget the person with dementia this Easter because it will make you and him/her feel good. What could be better than that!

    Order any of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com.
    These gifts are simple, inexpensive or free, and can be enjoyed by all.

    Thursday, March 8, 2018

    All About Eggs: An Activity for Those with Dementia

    Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two





    Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine


    When you hear the word egg, you might think of breakfast, an omelet, bacon or any number of things. This game is all about things eggs remind people with dementia of. Just about everyone has eaten or cooked with eggs or both. Thinking about eggs may remind you of certain holidays and special days as well. That is why the egg is a perfect topic.

    You can really start anywhere. In June National Egg Day is celebrated. I like to start by asking group members about ways to cook eggs. Most people with dementia do not eat raw eggs. Participants might say that you can fry eggs. Now here you could ask about ways to fry eggs such as scrambled or you could go on with other ways to cook eggs like boiling them.

    You could discuss what breakfast foods you make with eggs like French toast, waffles or pancakes. Pancakes and waffles could be another side discussion because there are many different foods you can mix with the batter to make different varieties of these breakfast treats. You might also put different types of toppings on as well.

    Still on the topic of breakfast, you and your participants with dementia can talk about foods you eat with eggs such as ham, bacon sausage or toast. As another side discussion, you can talk about varieties of any of these things. For example, if you are talking about types of toast and what toppings you could put on toast.


    Tuesday, March 6, 2018

    National Volunteer Week is Coming

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

    Points of Light
    National Volunteer Week is a time to celebrate people doing extraordinary things through service. Established in 1974, National Volunteer Week focuses national attention on the impact and power of volunteerism and service as an integral aspect of our civic leadership. The week draws the support and endorsement of the president and Congress, governors, mayors and municipal leaders, as well as corporate and community groups across the country.
    Through programs such as the President's Volunteer Service Award, Daily Point of Light Award and the Extra Mile – Points of Light Volunteer Pathway, we recognize individuals, families, nonprofit organizations and government entities and the tremendous impact they are making on our country's most critical challenges year-round.

    Take action

    • Share your stories – Tell us about the impact volunteers are having in your community or through your organization.
    • Learn more about these volunteer recognition programs and how to nominate volunteers for awards.
    • For more information on National Volunteer Week, please contact Jennifer Geckler at jgeckler@pointsoflight.org.