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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Perfect gift ideas for people with dementia

You as activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers will be buying or suggesting gifts for people with dementia

Here are a few grand suggestions:

First on the list of gifts for people is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of idea sand resources for you.

Another gift a dementia person will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD. Your mother will enjoy watching something from the good old days and singing the songs played throughout the picture.Here are a few suggestions: Singin’ in the Rain, Meet Me in St. Louis, or Shall We Dance

Next is a sing a long CD or audio cassette of their favorite songs. There is a series of these called, Old Time Favorites by Nancy Pitkin

You may want to get a sing a long video where you loved one can see and hear performers singing songs they love. A good one is, Sing-Along with Phil Bernardi: Songs We Know and Love

Here is another idea. Give some hand lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues she might have. If she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels and maybe about the good old days, as well

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit mom, she will appreciate your company even though she may not be able to express it. Take her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, give her a hand massage. Just share some quality time with her. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting. No arguing, please. .

A phone call or a card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

So no matter what you do, do not forget people with dementia because it will make you and them feel good. What could be better than that!

Order any of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com. Order the book, Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, at Amazon or at Activity Directors Network

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Autumn craft: A simple centerpiece

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two






Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Autumn gardens are filled with the makings for bouquets and arrangements that can be placed outside or, when it turns cooler and the holidays approach, brought inside for a centerpiece. Try an arrangement with the following late-blooming flowers, vegetables, berries, fruits, and leaves:

Flowers
Sunflowers, asters, dahlias, zinnias, hydrangeas, September flower, sage, autumn bugbane

Vegetables and herbs
Pumpkins, winter squash, gourds, peppers, winter wheat, dill, sage

Berries and fruits
Cranberries, beautyberries, nandina, baneberries, porcelain berries, crabapples, blue cohosh berries, apples, pomegranates, mandarin oranges

Leaves
Colorful leaves from trees such as maple, oak, and magnolia; bushes such as viburnum and burning bush; or vines such as grape leaves and porcelain vine


Thursday, August 20, 2015

Four easy ways to celebrate Rosh Hashanah with those who have dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be





5776 marks the beginning of another year. 5.5 million Americans have dementia. A good number of them are Jewish. What can you do to make someone with dementia feel good this Rosh Hashanah?

How celebrating this holy day helps uplift their spirit and yours

Here are some suggestions

Pray with them.

Most folks with dementia have strong ties to their religion. Even those with advanced dementia may spontaneously recite portions of a prayer service that was part of their past.
The problem may be to find a service that is appropriate. The traditional service is long and crowded.
Here are a few suggestions
*Go at the beginning or end of the service. That is when the least amount of congregants is in attendance.
*Contact some assisted living or nursing homes in the area. Many of them have short simple services highlighting the important prayers. This is a win, win situation. You can see what a place is like, and most often, activity directors love having visitors attend group activities. It makes all involved feel good. If this is not possible, have a short service at home. If you explain the situation to the Rabbi, he or she will let you borrow or buy a prayer book. He may even drop by for a visit. Alternatively, you can find some prayers online. Make sure to include some songs in your service or just sing the songs throughout the holiday. A good song might be: Shalom Aleichem

Carry on a family tradition

All families have something special they do during the high holidays. Of course, most families go to a synagogue. What about after that? Maybe you went to Aunt Betty’s. Aunt Betty may no longer be around, but you can recreate the atmosphere that was there. Invite one or two understanding friends to help you with this. The memories of visiting Aunt Betty will be there

Related to this is talking about past experiences on Rosh Hashanah or other holidays.

Discuss what happened at Aunt Betty’s. Regale a story about a funny experience that took place at Aunt Betty’s.
Do not ask: Do you remember?, but rather, just tell the story and let your loved one with dementia add comments. Talk about family members both past and present. You might say: "When Uncle Harry shook the table, he made us all laugh". Tell some jokes and laugh some more. Laughter is the best medicine

Eat a traditional meal or foods together

This activity can wake up the taste buds of a dementia person. Before the holiday, discuss the recipes. Talk about different ingredients you need. Prepare a simple recipe together. Plan the meal. Ask: What should we eat first?etc.
Have him or her help set the table or fold the napkins.
You can talk about favorite family foods. Then make sure you have some of these favorites during the actual meal.

No matter what you do the goal is to make your loved one with dementia, feel good. Do not be a stickler for the rules. Reward good tries. If you feel a need to go to a traditional service, hire someone or have a friend go with you. If the service is too much for the dementia person, the friend can take him for a walk or take him home. Often congregants feel a need to take a break from the service whether they have dementia or not.

With some planning, this Rosh Hashanah, 5776, can be a good one for you and your loved one with dementia

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Make a family tree

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two






Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

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Monday, August 10, 2015

Why Alzheimer's and Other Dementia Caregivers Should Be Honored This Labor Day



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is a game for those with dementia and other long term care residents

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals, 

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


As an Activity professional of clients or residents with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, you should be honored along with the other 50 million caregivers worldwide.

See what other caregivers do and why you should all be honored this Labor Day

click here to read the article

Thursday, August 6, 2015

Simple Dementia Activities

Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency 
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right 
Satirday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass 
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards 
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Game system aims to slow the advance of dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Naperville Sun

By JASON DUARTE For The Sun



When Naperville resident Jim McArdle began having trouble with his usual crossword puzzles and became frustrated with them, he went to see a doctor.

The 81-year-old was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease more than Last month, his son Jim E. McArdle of North Aurora entered a Father's Day online contest and won something that could help his father sort out life's other puzzles.

The system, called Dakim Brain Fitness, operates more like a game than a test, but tests both short- and long-term memory and operates in real time, adjusting the difficulty level based on each of the user's answers. The easy-to-use, touch-screen system aims to slow the advance of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. It hit the market in June.

The Dakim Brain Fitness System was created by inventor and CEO Dan Michel after he helped his father struggle through 13 years of Alzheimer's. During this time, Michel realized there is a therapeutic and emotional value in mental stimulation and came up with the system.

"It's based on standardized neurological tests," said Dakim representative Erika Schmit. "It tracks your success, and at the end of a session, you can see what your score is; long-term versus short-term."

As the elder McArdle answered the system's questions in his dining room, they would either get harder as he answered correctly, or easier if he answered incorrectly. This is what's known as "real time," Schmit said.