Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Those with dementia need physical activity

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


A new study shows that elderly people with dementia who have good balance, muscular strength and mobility are less likely to suffer from depression.


(Illustrative photo: Shutterstock / NTB Scanpix)
As many as 80% of nursing home residents have dementia, and many of them develop depression. They are normally sedentary and inactive.
Elderly people with dementia who have good muscular strength and balance and also high gait speed, show considerably less symptoms of depression, according to a new study conducted by doctoral research fellow and physiotherapist Linda Kvæl at Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA).
"Depression is a complex phenomenon, and physical functioning is not the sole reason here. There are many factors at play. But it is clear that physical function such as balance, muscular strength and condition can be positive for nursing home residents who have dementia," she says.
Many suffer from depression
Kvæl has considered the functioning of 170 nursing home residents with dementia, and she has studied whether there was a connection between the groups with and without depression as regards their physical functioning. The residents were divided between 18 nursing homes in Oslo.
The physical tests consisted of strength, balance, gait speed and the ability to carry out everyday activities.
Around 24% of the participants in the study were classified as depressed. This is consistent with previous research which says that around 50% of all nursing home residents suffer from mild depression symptoms, while one out of four suffer from depression that should be treated.
Maintain their balance longer
The researcher believes that more should be done to keep people with dementia physically active.
Exercise improves balance and strength and can in some cases slow down cognitive impairment. Previous research also shows that exercise can counteract the apathy that characterises many elderly people with dementia.
We also know that exercise can have a positive effect on depression, quality of sleep and condition, among other things. It also prevents and improves symptoms of conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
"I believe the quality of life or nursing home residents would improve if they were given the opportunity to maintain their physical functioning and to walk from place to place themselves. It will give them the opportunity to maintain their strength and balance longer," says Kvæl.
She says that the residents are often wheeled about in a wheelchair even if they are actually capable of walking.
"Staff who work with residents with dementia in nursing homes shouldn’t deprive them of the physical resources they still have," she says, and adds:
"In light of the modern hectic nursing home environment, this requires staff that have more time, positive attitudes and increased expertise."
Much more should be done
Life in a nursing home must be filled with more meaningful activities that can encourage involvement and participation. In addition, the health personnel must ensure that the residents get the opportunity to engage in physical activity through their everyday activities.
She adds that all activity throughout the day is important to the total functional ability. Standing up without help, using one’s legs to move about, walking up and down stairs and walking in the garden are activities that help to preserve leg strength and balance.
"Where needed, individual exercise programmes should be developed by a physiotherapist, as research shows that nursing home residents with dementia can safely take part in intensive exercise," she says.
"We must remember that all people have a basic need for movement, even people with dementia. It is likely that a more active approach to this group, in combination with other milieu measures, can prevent and treat depression."
Kvæl calls for services for frail elderly people that address this matter seriously.
"The reforms and guidelines are full of fancy words, but there is still a gap between the intentions and what actually takes place in practice," she points out.


Country 

Monday, February 26, 2018

National Vokunteer Week: Sample Letter to the Editor

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

[ORGANIZATION NAME] Announces Recognition Plans for 2018 National Volunteer Week

Local Volunteers Encouraged to Celebrate Service During National
Volunteer Week
[CITY/STATE, MONTH DAY, 2018 – ORGANIZATION NAME, ORGANIZATION
DESCRIPTION], today announced plans to celebrate National Volunteer Week, a time dedicated to demonstrating to the nation that by working together, we have the fortitude to meet our challenges and accomplish our goals.

National Volunteer Week, April 15-22, is about taking action and encouraging individuals and their respective communities to be at the center of social change discovering and actively demonstrating their collective power to foster positive transformation.

The volunteers at ORGANIZATION NAME have helped us to meet our challenges and have actively given our residents a higher quality of life by helping them in so many ways.

We will be honoring our volunteers on XXX by XXX

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Celebrating we are family day


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

March 11 is International We Are Family Day
Here is how we celebrated it in the past. Use some or all of these ideas?
We celebrated it by showing everyone why the residents, family members, staff, volunteers and anyone else who visits make your facility a great family.


Enthusiastically we told everyone involved that there is a special bond and common goals that they all share. Also tell them that they should be proud of this family.  We mentioned that individuals in any good family work together in respectful and cooperative ways to promote a good environment for everyone.


 We played the song, We Are Family. We substituted the names of people or groups of people like CNAs, nurses, activity department employees or whoever you want to mention as being part of the family.



We did this simple activity, especially for lower functioning groups, which is to do the ABCs of peoples’ names. Especially focus on the names of people who are residents, resident family members and/or staff members. Then say that all the people mentioned are part of the facilities family. To make this activity easier, just have residents mention as many random names as they can think of. You can show the residents pictures of familiar people or you can invite staff to make a brief appearance and have them mention their name. You can then repeat their name(s) and invite residents to say the names with you. At the end of the activity, make sure to say that everyone is part of the facility family.
Another activity we did was make a family quilt. Each resident, staff member, volunteer or family member, who wanted to, decorated a piece of cardstock with help if necessary. Even though quilts are usually made up of squares, using an 8.5 x 11 piece of cardstock might be easier and less costly. When everyone, who wanted to completed his/her piece, we put all the pieces together. This showed everyone that each person is part of a bigger family. All who want to are to put whatever they want to represent themselves or their family. They used photos, drawings, fabric, paint, words anything they want to that fits on the piece of cardstock. It is amazing to see how it looked after it was all put together.
I hope you have brought warm happy feelings into the lives of your residents, family members, staff and volunteers by celebrating International We Are Family Day.

Here is one of our quilts

Flowers, fresh ideas are in bloom

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Here is an idea for your facility or home




For residents and staff of Wood Haven, everything's coming up roses. And petunias. And zinnias. And geraniums.
That's because a concerted effort to beautify the grounds and involve residents came into bloom this spring. The KaBloom program, thought up through a group effort by programming staff and administrators, saw well over 300 flowers and vegetable plants planted at the care facility, 1965 E. Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green.

"It's been known that gardening has been able to lower blood pressure and increase brain activities and give a good general feel to whoever is doing it. We are doing all kinds of different activities. The KaBloom program pretty much came out of getting the residents outside on nice days in May and to get the employees involved and the families involved," said Jeff Orlowski, Wood Haven's administrator. "We're completely different than we were three years ago at Wood Haven. We wanted to get more colors outside and show this is an inviting place and wanted everybody to take pride in living here, working here and visiting here."
The residents continue to take care of the plants that have been installed, and some tend to elevated beds that eliminate the need to stoop and kneel when they garden. Orlowski said some of the raised beds contain herbs and vegetables that the residents can take care of and eat. KaBloom is also spurring more activities beyond planting and tending, and some residents are making garden stones to be placed throughout the grounds.
"The whole focus of these activities, and this is our overall goal at Wood Haven, is providing an outstanding experience, and activities are so much a part of that," Orlowski said. "We brainstormed with a bunch of ideas and kind of used the inspiration of a cruise ship. On a cruise ship, there are nonstop activities for all ages to enjoy, and we kind of wanted to use that as a guideline. We asked, 'what can we do to get more people involved, to have more activities' and so forth."
Many staff members and numerous residents and their families were involved in the initial effort this spring. The plants that can be seen around Wood Haven include mock roses, petunias, geraniums, zinnias, daisies, impatiens, basil, lavender, thyme, chives, parsley, tomatoes, green peppers and sunflowers, "for Bob," Orlowski said.
Community Relations Director Chris Stearns notes resident Bob Boyer is very involved in the KaBloom program and he also requested hollyhocks to add an additional punch of color.
"He's very into the courtyard, the flowers and the vegetables out there," Stearns said, "He told them he wanted hollyhocks out there. I haven't seen any flowers yet, but they did plant some hollyhocks out there for him."
Stearns said the plants, which are a mix of perennials and annuals, were obtained from Joseph's Greenhouse for a discount. Orlowski said the KaBloom program will be repeated annually.
"We'll invite families, staff and community to come out and get their thumbs dirty," he said.
The flowers and vegetables are just part of what's currently blooming at Wood Haven, which has been in existence in its current location since 1971.
Orlowski said that a host of renovations to update the facility are underway, and they are in phase three of five phases.
"We are scheduled to be completed in September. They are currently working on phase three. Phase three and four involves redoing the hallways and phase five will be the main lobby. We are doing the main lobby, the hallways, the dining room and we have already painted the residents' rooms," he said. He has a long history with Wood Haven, as he used to volunteer at the center while attending Bowling Green State University in the mid-90s, and noted the building needed updates.
"We've updated the residents' rooms," Stearns said. "It's more modernized."
One feature that Orlowski is particularly excited about is the upcoming transformation of the facility's dining room. In an effort to give residents more choices, the dining room will become two restaurants.
"We're actually going to be turning our dining room into two restaurants. One will be called the Wood Haven Grille where you can get traditional meals and the other one is going to be called Le Cafe Au Bois, which is going to be a French cafe concept. That will be open for breakfast and lunch, and on nice days, residents can eat on the cafe's patio outside, which I think is a first in this area," Orlowski said. Families and visitors will be able to eat meals with their loved ones at the restaurants with residents.
Orlowski notes the support of the Wood County commissioners as being a key help in bringing the updated vision of Wood Haven to fruition.
"It's great that the commissioners are 100 percent pushing this and supportive of this. We are very fortunate that they really care about the residents here at Wood Haven and making it a success," Orlowski said.
Wood Haven is a skilled and intermediate nursing facility that offers both long-term care and short-term rehabilitation. The 95-bed facility is both Medicare and Medicaid certified and accepts most private insurance. Wood Haven Health Care is owned and operated under the Board of Wood County Commissioners.
It's history in the community is long. In 1868, the Wood County Board of Infirmary Directors purchased a 200-acre farm on which to build a three-story building to house the county infirmary. Additions in 1892 included a barn, staff quarters and a new resident wing. In 1913, the governing powers were transferred to the county commissioners, and the Infirmary became the Wood County Home in 1919.
In 1971, the county home was relocated and replaced with a modern 125-bed, single-story brick building and dedicated as the Wood County Nursing Home. The original building and acreage was turned over to the Wood County Historical Society in 1973 and currently houses the Wood County Historical Society and Museum.


Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Mount Rushmore Day is coming in March

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Mount Rushmore Day is celebrated in March . Here are some facts to discuss with your residents


Here are a some Mount Rushmore facts for inquiring minds
  • Borglum was 60 years old when he began working on the monument.
  • Rushmore's granite faces tower over 5,500 feet above sea level.
  • The carvings are scaled to men who would stand 465 feet tall.
  • Each President's head is as tall as a six-story building.
  • Over 800 million pounds of stone was removed from Mount Rushmore during the construction.
  • Imagine climbing 506 steps to reach the top of Mount Rushmore-this was how many steps the workers had to climb each day!
  • The president's noses are 20 feet long, their mouths 18 feet wide, and their eyes are 11 feet across!
  • Did you know that Gutzon Borglum was a student of renowned French artist Auguste Rodin, and was one of America's most successful artists before even considering Mount Rushmore? His Mares of Diomedes was the first American work purchased by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. He also has 5 statues on display at the U.S. Capitol Building.
  • Here is an astonishing fact: no deaths occurred during the whole period of carving, just a few minor injuries.
  • Can you imagine that with all the dynamite used?

Learn more about Mount Rushmore with a Mount Rushmore Tour.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

How Daylight Savings Time Affects Those with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

First Light Home Care
How Daylight Savings Time Effects Your Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease
Posted by Gina Kaurich in Alzheimer's & Dementia Care, Caregiving, Health & Wellness
Daylight Savings Time starts Sunday March 13.

Read this for some insight as to how daylight savings time may affect your loved one or client with dementia
It occurred to me as I sat at breakfast with my mother in law, Martha, who suffers with Alzheimer’s disease that she didn’t seem quite herself today.  That may sound strange to some of you but even as an individual is progressing through the dementia stages they do retain certain parts of their personality.  Now, sometimes the subtle changes can occur before an illness such as a urinary tract infection or even dehydration.  So I started this morning with running through the gamut of potential problems.  Beginning with the small things such as the lighting being adequate, is she warm enough, does she have her hearing aids in place and are they turned up so she can hear me.  I then moved on to what I call the intermediate of potential issues, such as did she take her medications last night and today, did she seem stuffy or congested this morning, had she had a bowel movement yesterday, or did her unusually quiet behavior reflect something else.  She seemed tired and when she asked what time it was, it hit me; last night was the shift to Daylight Savings Time.
Now you would not expect this to create any problems for someone who is not cognitively aware of the time of day any longer; but just like a baby or child, the individual with Alzheimer’s has a sense something is different.  We did not necessarily get her up an hour earlier or make any changes to her routine but she sensed a change.  She asked repeatedly during the day what time it was and finally said she felt tired today.  There are times when she is such a “hoot”!  Her surprised reaction when we told her the time was, “Oh my, how could I have slept so long.”  And when we all laugh, she laughs and enjoys herself right along with the rest of us, it is wonderful.  I love to see her have those happy moments.
Meals were the epicenter of her confusion with Day Light Savings time; she just couldn’t believe it was time to eat again.  This made us all laugh again since Martha is a very tiny woman who weighs about 98 pounds but eats constantly.  Around our house we have candy dishes filled with her favorite “Hershey Kisses” along with bowls of unsalted pecans, almonds and fruit.  Needless to say, she does not go hungry.  However, today her eating pattern has shifted and instead of eating all of those treats between meals, she is eating them about an hour later.  Our grandchildren came over and she helped fix tacos, salad and brownies for dinner and guess who ate her weight in brownies?  It is wonderful to watch how animated she becomes when around children.  You can see she is back to raising her daughter and five boys; her old behaviors to keep them busy kick in.
Once dinner was over and as the sun went down she began to become restless and uncomfortable; not unusual for most people with dementia.  Martha rubs her hands together when she is unsettled which helps by giving us an indicator to her state of mind.  Her bright blue eyes begin to fade.  She asks my husband to take her home which we finally figured out to mean Tennessee, where she grew up with “Momma and Daddy”.  Then she wants to know if the lady of the house cares if she goes to bed.  She and I walk together upstairs to begin her bedtime routine and she says to me that she is so tired and the day has gone by so fast.  I agree and to some degree am always surprised at how much she continues to teach me every day about those living with dementia.

Friday, February 16, 2018

The Story of Purim

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Purim is a fun holiday even if you are not Jewish. Part of the celebration is telling the story of Purim. When telling the story, every time members of your audience hear the name Haman, theu must boo and stamp their feet or make noise with the traditional Jewis noisemaker, the grager.






The Story of Purim


Once upon a time in a town called Shushan, there lived a man called Mordechai.  He was a very good man, and always tried to help people and do the right thing.  Mordechai lived with his niece Esther, and they were Jewish,


In the same town there was a king called King Ahashverosh.  He lived in a big palace and had lots of money, but he was a bit lonely. He needed a new queen to come and live with him in the palace.  He looked everywhere and eventually he decided that the one person he liked most of all was Esther, who was not only pretty but also kind and very smart.


So Esther said goodbye to her Uncle Mordechai and went to live in the palace with the King and become his queen, but she didn’t tell him she was Jewish.


Now there was a man who worked in the palace who was not very nice.  His name was Haman.  He expected everyone to do exactly what he said, and to bow down to him when they saw him, and Haman got angry if someone didn’t do exactly what he wanted.


One day Haman met Mordechai, and Mordechai did not bow down to him.  Haman became very cross and he went to the King and said, “There are some people around here who do things differently from other people, and I think you should make them go away.”


The King didn’t really know what Haman was talking about, but he said “OK, you can tell those people to go away, the ones who do things differently”.


What Haman wanted to do was to get rid of Mordechai and Esther and all their Jewish friends!


The Jewish people were very sad, because they liked living in the kingdom and they didn’t want to go away.  What could they do??  Mordechai sent a message to Esther at the palace, and the message said “Esther we need your help!  That nasty Haman wants to get rid of us all!  Please talk to the King and ask him to stop Haman.”


Queen Esther thought “I must be very brave” and she made a special dinner for the King, with all his favorite foods.  Then she invited the King and Haman to come and have dinner with her.  The King thought dinner was delicious, and he was so happy that after he finished eating, he said to Queen Esther “What can I do for you, to say thank you?”


Queen Esther said “Oh please, I need you to help me and my uncle Mordechai and all our friends, because someone wants to make us go away”.


“That is terrible!” said the King, because he really liked Esther and he didn’t want her to go away. 


“Who wants to get rid of you and your family and friends?”


Esther pointed at Haman and said “It’s him! Haman wants to get rid of us!”
“Oh no!” said the King, and he was very angry indeed.  He called his guards and said “Take away Haman and get rid of him instead!”


Then the king asked Mordechai to come and work at the palace and do Haman’s job – but of course Mordechai was much nicer than Haman! And nobody had to go and live anywhere else if they didn’t want to.


So after that, everyone lived happily in the Kingdom.  Mordechai did a really good job working for the king, and Queen Esther made delicious biscuits called Hamantaschen to remind everyone that the wickedness of Haman is no more..

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Chinese Fortunes



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Chinese Zodiac uses 12 animal signs to predict people's fortune. The twelve animals are Rat, Cow, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Chicken, Dog and Pig. The 12 Chinese zodiac signs are determined by people's birth year. Most of Internet Chinese horoscope sites use Chinese New Year Day to determine the Chinese zodiac sign, which is wrong.
The first day of the Chinese astrological year is the first day of the Rabbit Month (Start of Spring). The Tiger Month begins around February 4, each year. If you were born before February 7, then you should check Your Chinese Zodiac Sign first before reading your Chinese zodiac 2016. The simplest way to prove Chinese zodiac signs not determined by Chinese New Year days is to see your Chinese Astrology Birth Chart using your birthday and birth time.

Besides using astrology animal signs basic fighting and attraction relationships, Chinese zodiac also uses Chinese astrology constellations, which are the way ancient Chinese grouped the stars in the sky, to predict the coming fortune. More than 100 stars are using in the Chinese zodiac. The common use ones are about 60. Each star has a different characteristics. Basically, they can be divided into Lucky Stars and Unlucky Stars, which are the major factors to predict people good or bad luck in the coming year.

Personalities
Chinese zodiac signs represent twelve different types of personalities. The zodiac traditionally begins with the sign of the Rat, and there are many stories about the origins of the Chinese Zodiac which explain why this is so (see below). The following are the twelve zodiac signs in order and their characteristics.[1]

Rat (Yang, 1st Trine, Fixed Element Water): Forthright, tenacious, systematic, meticulous, charismatic, sensitive, hardworking, industrious, charming, eloquent, sociable, artistic, shrewd. Can be manipulative, vindictive, mendacious, venal, selfish, obstinate,critical, over-ambitious, ruthless, intolerant, scheming.

Ox (Water buffalo in Vietnam) (Yin, 2nd Trine, Fixed Element Water): Dependable, calm, methodical, born leader, patient, hardworking, ambitious, conventional, steady, modest, logical, resolute, tenacious. Can be stubborn, narrow-minded, materialistic, rigid, demanding.

Tiger (Yang, 3rd Trine, Fixed Element Wood): Unpredictable, rebellious, colorful, powerful, passionate, daring, impulsive, vigorous, stimulating, sincere, affectionate, humanitarian, generous. Can be restless, reckless, impatient, quick-tempered, obstinate, selfish, aggressive, unpredictable.

Rabbit (Cat in Vietnam) (Yin, 4th Trine, Fixed Element Wood): Luckiest of all, Gracious, good friend, kind, sensitive, soft-spoken, amiable, elegant, reserved, cautious, artistic, thorough, tender, self-assured, shy, astute, compassionate, flexible. Can be moody, detached, superficial, self-indulgent, opportunistic, stubborn.

Dragon (Snail in Kazakhstan) (Yang, 1st Trine, Fixed Element Wood): Magnanimous, stately, vigorous, strong, self-assured, proud, noble, direct, dignified, zealous, eccentric, intellectual, fiery, passionate, decisive, pioneering, ambitious, artistic, generous, loyal. Can be tactless, arrogant, imperious, tyrannical, demanding, intolerant, dogmatic, violent, impetuous, brash.

Snake (Yin, 2nd Trine, Fixed Element Fire): Deep thinker, wise, mystic, graceful, soft-spoken, sensual, creative, prudent, shrewd, ambitious, elegant, cautious, responsible, calm, strong, constant, purposeful. Can be loner, bad communicator, possessive, hedonistic, self-doubting, distrustful, mendacious, suffocating, cold.

Horse (Yang, 3rd Trine, Fixed Element Fire): Cheerful, popular, quick-witted, changeable, earthy, perceptive, talkative, agile - mentally and physically, magnetic, intelligent, astute, flexible, open-minded. Can be fickle, arrogant, childish, anxious, rude, gullible, stubborn.

Ram (Goat in Vietnam) (Yin, 4th Trine, Fixed Element Fire): Righteous, sincere, sympathetic, mild-mannered, shy, artistic, creative, gentle, compassionate, understanding, mothering, determined, peaceful, generous, seeks security. Can be moody, indecisive, over-passive, worrier, pessimistic, over-sensitive, complainer, weak-willed.

Monkey (Yang, 1st Trine, Fixed Element Metal): Inventor, motivator, improviser, quick-witted, inquisitive, flexible, innovative, problem solver, self-assured, sociable, artistic, polite, dignified, competitive, objective, factual, intellectual. Can be egotistical, vain, selfish, reckless, snobbish, deceptive, manipulative, cunning, jealous, suspicious.

Rooster (Yin, 2nd Trine, Fixed Element Metal): Acute, neat, meticulous, organized, self-assured, decisive, conservative, critical, perfectionist, alert, zealous, practical, scientific, responsible. Can be over zealous and critical, puritanical, egotistical, abrasive, opinionated, given to empty bravado.

Dog (Yang, 3rd Trine, Fixed Element Metal): Honest, intelligent, straightforward, loyal, sense of justice and fair play, attractive, amicable, unpretentious, sociable, open-minded, idealistic, moralistic, practical, affectionate, sensitive, easy going. Can be cynical, lazy, cold, judgmental, pessimistic, worrier, stubborn, quarrelsome.

Pig (Wild boar in Japan and Elephant in Northern Thailand) (Yin, 4th Trine, Fixed Element Water): Honest, gallant, sturdy, sociable, peace-loving, patient, loyal, hard-working, trusting, sincere, calm, understanding, thoughtful, scrupulous, passionate, intelligent. Can be naïve, over-reliant, self-indulgent, gullible, fatalistic, materialistic.

More Chinese New Year information

Monday, February 12, 2018

Mardi Gras Songs for Long Term Care Residents

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGOccHdgpiw

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare
professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

My Ideas for Mardi Gras Songs for Long Term Care Residents


Songs
Hail, Hail the Gang’s all here

When the Saints Go Marching In
Who else is marching in? -people in the group- soldiers- children

If You Are Happy and You Know It
Clap hands, stamp feet , shout horray etc

Ain’t we got fun
Every morning
Every evening
Ain't we got fun
Not much money
Oh but honey
Ain't We Got Fun
The rent's unpaid dear
We have'nt a bus
But smiles were made dear
For people like us

In the winter
In the summer
Don't we have fun
Times are bum and getting bummer
Still we have fun
There's nothing surer
The rich get rich and the poor get children
In the meantime
In between time
Ain't we got fun

Let Me Call You Sweetheart

Baby Face

The Band Played on

For Me and My Gal

Happy days are here again
The skies above are clear again
So let's sing a song of cheer again
Happy days are here again

K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door.
K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy,
You're the only g-g-g-girl that I adore;
When the m-m-m-moon shines,
Over the cowshed,
I'll be waiting at the k-k-k-kitchen door

Oh Susanna

There is a tavern in the town
There is a tavern in the town (in the town)
And there my true love sits him down (sits him down)
And drinks his wine as merry as can be,
And never, never thinks of me.

Fare thee well, for I must leave thee,
Do not let this parting grieve thee,
And remember that the best of friends
Must part, must part.

Adieu, adieu kind friends, adieu (yes, adieu)
I can no longer stay with you, stay with you,
I'll hang my harp on the weeping willow tree,
And may the world go well with thee.

Show Me the way to go home

After the ball is over, after the break of morn,
After the dancers' leaving, after the stars are gone,
Many a heart is aching, if you could read them all—
Many the hopes that have vanished after the ball.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Valentine's Day Activities for Those Suffering from Dementia

valentines day vintage lettering background
Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

With more than 5.5 Americans living with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, loved ones and healthcare professionals need to take every chance to make the lives of those stricken better and happier.

It is also important that while doing this, you stimulate a dementia sufferer's mind to make his or her decline slower.

What can you do this Valentine's Day that will be engaging, fun and exciting for someone with dementia?

What you do depends a lot on the likes, dislikes and interests of the person with dementia. Make sure you do something fun together, no matter what it is.
First before the holiday even begins, you and persons with dementia can create and send valentines.

If you decide to make the valentines, you can use construction paper, stickers, or doilies. You can precut hearts out of paper if necessary. Then ask the dementia person to place the stickers on the hearts. You may have to hand those with Alzheimer's disease, one sticker at a time. If this is too difficult, just ask the dementia person where the sticker should be placed. You can have fun with the stickers also. Stick one on your nose. Then laugh. As you know laughter is the best medicine.

Use your imagination to come up with other materials you can use to create a valentine such as: magic markers, lace, ribbon, or photographs

Remember even if the valentines do not look that good, it is the process not the product that counts.

In addition, you do not have to make the valentines. You can buy an inexpensive box of valentines. There are many that are appropriate for adults. Encourage those with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia to sign the cards. Often a person with mid stage dementia can still sign his name. If not, have him just look at the valentines. You can comment on the colors and objects on the valentines. Ask the dementia person what these things remind him of. If he needs help tell him what the objects remind you of


Thursday, February 8, 2018

A Rose Mandala to Color and Rose Facts



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is some information to help you celebrate Rose Day which i in February


Interesting Facts about Roses 

  • Copy this mandala rose picture or have your group create their own mandala art

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Ash Wednesday for Those with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Ash Wednesday is February 14 this year, 2018

Journey to Jerusalem: Scriptures, Meditations, and Prayers From Ash Wednesday Through Easter

Journey to Jerusalem: Scriptures, Meditations, and Prayers From Ash Wednesday Through Easter


For Ash Wednesday, I thought I would share a special Ash Wednesday spiritual circle which is sure to bring peace, comfort and joy to those with Alzheimer’s disease, related dementias, and to other long term care residents.

Begin with an opening hymm. I like:
Blow Ye Trumpets Blow
Other hymns I suggest are:
Ashes to Ashes and
Lay Aside Your Passing Pleasure
Secular songs I suggest are:
Battle Hymn of the Republic
Always
I Love You Truly
I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles
You are My Sunshine
Talk about this reflection
God will deliver His promises as we are able to receive them.
What He is doing is right for us. We should listen to His messenger.
Instead of a story, read this poem
Marked by Ashes Ruler of the Night, Guarantor of the day . . .
This day — a gift from you.
This day — like none other you have ever given, or we have ever received.
This Wednesday dazzles us with gift and newness and possibility.
This Wednesday burdens us with the tasks of the day, for we are already halfway home
     halfway back to committees and memos,
     halfway back to calls and appointments,
     halfway on to next Sunday,
     halfway back, half frazzled, half expectant,
     half turned toward you, half rather not. This Wednesday is a long way from Ash Wednesday,
   but all our Wednesdays are marked by ashes —
     we begin this day with that taste of ash in our mouth:
       of failed hope and broken promises,
       of forgotten children and frightened women,
     we ourselves are ashes to ashes, dust to dust;
     we can taste our mortality as we roll the ash around on our tongues.We are able to ponder our ashness with
   some confidence, only because our every Wednesday of ashes
   anticipates your Easter victory over that dry, flaky taste of death. On this Wednesday, we submit our ashen way to you —
   you Easter parade of newness.
   Before the sun sets, take our Wednesday and Easter us,
     Easter us to joy and energy and courage and freedom;
     Easter us that we may be fearless for your truth.
   Come here and Easter our Wednesday with
     mercy and justice and peace and generosity.We pray as we wait for the Risen One who comes soon.
For over thirty years now, Walter Brueggemann (b. 1933) has combined the best of critical scholarship with love for the local church in service to the kingdom of God. Now a professor emeritus of Old Testament studies at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia, Brueggemann has authored over seventy books. Taken from his Prayers for a Privileged People (Nashville: Abingdon, 2008), pp. 27-28
Questions for Discussion:
Q: What is Ash Wednesday?
A:Ash Wednesday is the day Lent begins. It occurs forty days before Good Friday..
Q: Why is it called Ash Wednesday?
A:Actually, Ash Wednesday is its colloquial name. Its official name is the Day of Ashes. It is called Ash Wednesdaybecause, being forty days before Good Friday, it always falls on a Wednesday and it is called AshWednesday because on that day at church the faithful have their foreheads marked with ashes in the shape of a cross
Q: Why do they have their foreheads marked with a cross?
A: Because in the Bible a mark on the forehead is a symbol of a person’s ownership. By having their foreheads marked with the sign of a cross, this symbolizes that the person belongs to Jesus Christ, who died on a Cross..
Q: Where do the ashes used on Ash Wednesday come from?
A: They are made by burning palm fronds which have been saved from the previous year’s Palm Sunday, they are then blessed by a priest
More Prayers
Father in Heaven,
Let Us Pray
[for the grace to keep Lent faithfully]
Lord
Protect us in our struggle against evil.
As we begin the discipline of Lent,
make this season holy by our self-denial.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, for ever and ever.
International Committee on English in the Liturgy (ICEL)
Penitential Prayer of St. Ambrose of Milan
O Lord, who hast mercy upon all,
take away from me my sins,
and mercifully kindle in me
the fire of thy Holy Spirit.
Take away from me the heart of stone,
and give me a heart of flesh,
a heart to love and adore Thee,
a heart to delight in Thee,
to follow and enjoy Thee, for Christ’s sake, Amen
St. Ambrose of Milan (AD 339-397)
Prayer of St. Ephraim the Syrian 
O Lord and Master of my life,
give me not the spirit of laziness,
despair, lust of power, and idle talk. (prostration)
But give rather the spirit of sobriety,
humility, patience and love to Thy servant. (prostration)
Yea, O Lord and King,
grant me to see my own transgressions
and not to judge my brother,
for blessed art Thou unto ages of ages. Amen (prostration)
St. Ephraim the Syrian (AD 305-373)
End with the song
This is the Day