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Friday, July 24, 2015

Simple apple facts


Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia




Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Red Delicious Apple
I’m a conical (cone) shaped apple with a greenish-yellow background covered with red stripes. I have a firm, crisp, creamy-white flesh with a sweet juicy, highly aromatic flavour.
Jonathan Apple
I’m a small to medium round apple with a deep red skin which has faint, deep red stripes. I have a fine grained, juicy white flesh with a sweet acid flavour and I’m great eaten out of hand.
Granny Smith Apple
I’m a round, conical shaped apple with a rich green skin. I have a crisp, firm, juicy, greenish-white flesh with a distinctive acidy flavour, which makes me excellent for cooking.
Braeburn Apple
I’m a medium to large, round to conical shaped apple with a glossy, striped red blush over yellow coloured skin. I have a sweet flavour with pale cream, crisp, juicy flesh.
Bonza Apple
I’m a medium to large, flat-round apple with a bold red blush which overlays green to yellow coloured skin. I have a distinct, sweet flavour and firm, juicy, white flesh.
Pink Lady Apple
I’m a medium, round-oblong shaped apple with yellow skin overlaid with a pink to light red blush. I’m a cross between a Golden Delicious and Lady Williams, which makes me excellent for eating out of hand as I have a crisp, fine, sweet tasting flesh.
Golden Delicious Apple
I’m a medium to large, round to conical shaped apple with a pale green to yellow coloured skin with creamy-green, crisp flesh. I have a pleasant sweet flavour and good aroma. I’m great for eating out of hand or I can be used for cooking.
Fuji Apple
I’m a medium to large, flat-round to round shaped apple with a blushed dull red to crimson colour with firm, dense flesh. I have a high water and sugar content which makes me a juicy apple and my distinctive honey-sweet flavour is wonderful in stews and bakes.
Gala Apple (Royal Gala)
I’m a medium, round shaped apple. My skin colour varies slightly depending on which strain I belong to and can range from a pale, golden yellow with slight red blush, to solid brightly red blushed. I have a crisp, dense flesh with a flavour sweeter than a Delicious Apple.

Monday, July 20, 2015

National golf day



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]






Here is how the scoring goes in golf for a hole that is a par 4
1= a hole in one
2=an eagle
3= a birdie
4= par
5= bogie
6= double bogie This is related to an activity written about in the Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine

Holiday Insights

National Golf Day is October 4th



National Golf Day is a major charitable event, sponsored annually since 1952 by the PGA.

On National Golf Day, all of the over 4,300 professional members  the PGA are encouraged to play golf with contributors. The entry fees of contributors goes towards a wide range of charitable causes. Each year, a top ranked golfer is made chairman of this event. This is a truly admirable and worthy event. Many golf course hold their own events, with the proceeds going to charities.

When is the date?
Calendar companies, and Ecard websites have this day documented on October 4th.

Origin of National Golf Day:

The Professional Golfer's Association (PGA) created and sponsors National Golf Day. It has been held every year since its inception in 1952. The first event was held at Cog Hill Golf and Country Club, in Lemont, Il. The first event raised $80,000 for charities.


Did You Know? At the very first National Golf Day event, celebrities Bob Hope, Dean Martin, and Jerry Lewis were in attendance.


We did not find any documentation confirming this to be a "National" day. We found no congressional records or presidential proclamation. However, the contributions of this day to charitable groups, would make this day worthy of national recognition.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Name That Tune Facts


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two




Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]




Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, Name That Tune Day is in early July. Here are some facts you can share with your loved one or clients with dementia.




From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Name That Tune was a television game show that put two contestants against each other to test their knowledge of songs.


Premiering in the United States in the early 1950s, the show was created and produced by Harry Salter and his wife, Roberta.


"Name That Tune" ran from 1953-1959 on NBC and CBS in prime time. The first hosts were Red Benson and later Bill Cullen, but George DeWitt became most identified with the show. DeWitt could sing well, which was vital to the show's success; Benson and Cullen did not possess such talents.[citation needed]


Richard Hayes also emceed a local edition from 1970-1971. However, the best-remembered syndicated version aired once a week (expanded to twice a week for its final season) from 1974-1981 with host Tom Kennedy. Another version aired weekdays during 1984 and 1985, hosted by Jim Lange; this version was heavily re-run on cable TV for almost a decade.


The orchestra was conducted by Bob Alberti (1974-1975), Tommy Oliver (1975-1979, and the entire run of the Lange version), and Stan Worth (1979-1981); a second band, Dan Sawyer and the Sound System, was also featured from 1978-1981. The 1976-1985 versions were both titled "The $100,000 Name That Tune".


NBC also aired two versions of Name That Tune in the 1970s. The first, hosted by Dennis James, ran from July 29, 1974 until January 3, 1975. NBC tried again from January 3 to June 10, 1977, with Kennedy at the helm. Essentially, both were lower-paying versions of the better-known night-time program. The NBC failures made Name That Tune distinctive for that era in that it represented a syndicated success that did not rely on a well-established concurrent run on a network.[citation needed]


Television producer Ralph Edwards packaged the versions between 1974 and 1981; Sandy Frank, who earlier syndicated the Edwards-packaged episodes, staged the one-season Lange version in the mid-1980s. John Harlan announced the show during the entirety of this period.


Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Alzheimer's and Dementia Activities: What Works for Your Loved One?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope 

I thought this article might give you, as an Activities Directors, some ideas
Harriet Hodgson
Harriet HodgsonLevel: PlatinumHarriet Hodgson has been an independent journalist

Coming up with activities that work for my 98 1/2-year-old father-in-law is difficult. He has severe dementia, can hardly hear (he has a cochlear implant and a hearing aid), has trouble seeing, and needs a walker to get around. Many resources have been written about activities for people with memory disease and they include crafts, sing-alongs, music therapy, dancing, cooking, gardening, woodworking, and walking clubs.
None of these activities work for Dad. We have racked our brains to come up with activities that work for him. The things we do with Dad take lots of advance planning and we consider:
TIMING. It takes Dad several hours to awaken fully and get his mind working. We have found that afternoon and early evening activities work best for him.
WEATHER. We check weather forecasts ahead of time and make sure Dad is dressed for the weather and has extra clothing.
MEDICATIONS. If we are going to be gone for several hours, or a day, we order Dad's medications ahead of time. We make a list of what he takes and when he takes it.
EXTRA SUPPLIES. As Dad has gotten older his asthma has gotten worse. We make sure Dad has an inhaler with him and extra batteries for his hearing aid.
Dad lives in Assisted Living........read the whole article

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Growing Connections: Gardening with Seniors



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Aging Care
By June Fletcher,

To grow a more meaningful and healthy connection with an elderly loved one, put on some rubber clogs and head out together to the garden.
At any age, gardening is one of the best activities we can do outdoors, several experts told AgingCare.com. It stimulates all of the senses; awakens our connection with nature and with each other; and rewards us with fresh flowers and juicy tomatoes. "It's restorative, even if you have dementia," says Dee McGuire, a horticultural therapist at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Baltimore.
Gardening is also an excellent way for aging bodies to get a moderate-intensity aerobic workout, shed calories and stay flexible, according to a Kansas State University study. That's one reason why gardening remains popular with Americans well into their golden years. Indeed, about three-quarters of households age 55 or older participated in some form of lawn and garden activity in 2010, according to the National Gardening Association (NGA).
Still, there's no question that bending, lifting, kneeling, squatting, weeding and pruning—not to mention dealing with sun, heat and bugs-- all become more challenging as we grow older.
But there are ways to cope. Bruce Butterfield, the NGA's research director, says his mother was able to garden until her death at age 96 by growing flowers in about 70 big pots connected to an automatic irrigation system. "She placed them around the patio so she could get to them easily using her walker," he says.
Protection against pests and the elements is important, too, both for caregivers and seniors. New York dermatologist Arielle Kauvar says gardeners should slather on sunscreen and insect repellents before putting on clothes, so no area is overlooked. "And don't forget to protect your lips," Dr. Kauvar says, suggesting a lip balm with an SPF of at least 30.
Here are more tips for aging gardeners from these and other experts:
Rethink the Landscape
-- Reassess the yard with an eye to lowering maintenance. Wherever possible, remove lawn and replace it with ground covers, mulched beds, and paved areas or paths.
-- Add benches or chairs under shady trees.
-- Create raised beds to improve drainage and make harvesting easier. Lightweight plastic landscape timbers can be stacked to form raised beds at waist or wheelchair height, if necessary. Make the beds narrow, so anyone can reach into the center without straining.
-- Make vertical gardens by growing vining plants upward using trellises, tomato cages, bamboo stakes, fences, walls or arbors as supports. It will cut down on bending and make harvesting easier.
-- Change steps to wide, curving, gently sloping paths. Use pavers or fine gravel to line paths rather than wood chips or river rocks. Paths should be at least four feet wide to allow walker and wheelchair access, and wider at the end so wheelchairs can turn around.
-- Build high fences to keep out deer and other pests. Add latches and locks to gates if the gardener has memory problems and is prone to wandering.
-- Install an irrigation system to cut down on watering, and low-voltage lighting to improve visibility on paths and steps in the evenings.
-- Plant in containers using lightweight "soil-less" mixtures and resin or foam-walled pots to reduce weight. Put pots on casters.
-- Avoid hanging baskets, since they dry out quickly, require frequent fertilization, and can be difficult to reach.
Tend to the Gardener
-- Work in the morning and evening, when it's coolest.
-- Bring a water bottle to prevent dehydration.
-- Wear sturdy shoes, a broad-brimmed hat and gardening gloves.
-- Bend at the knees and hips to avoid injury.
-- Move from one activity to another to avoid stressing any particular muscle group.
-- Paint tool handles in neon colors or wrap them in brightly colored tape so they're easy to find if dropped.
-- Use manual shears instead of power hedge clippers to avoid accidents.
-- Hire labor (or commandeer adult children and grandchildren) to do the heaviest lifting, digging and grading.
-- If there's no room for a backyard garden, join or form a community garden.
-- If a garden-loving senior becomes bedridden, bring the outdoors inside. Plant a mini-garden in pots on the windowsill, or create a maintenance-free terrarium in an old glass or plastic container

Friday, July 10, 2015

Pet therapy for those with dementia (Part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Pet therapy(Part 2)

Finally, although pet therapy is effective with many people with dementia, it is important to remember that not everyone enjoys the presence of animals. A man who has been terrified of large dogs his entire life, for instance, will probably not benefit from being visited by a Great Dane, and a woman who spent her childhood chasing rabbits out of the garden may not want to have one curled up on her lap. Like any other type of therapeutic intervention, pet therapy should take the patient's likes and dislikes into account.

For people who enjoy animals, though, pet therapy offers some solid benefits: better health, more relaxed mood, enhanced connection to the world, improved communication, and the badly needed chance to play and create.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Lemonade - a refreshing summer drink for those with dementia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals Did You Know that lemonade is a great drink for those with dementia. It tastes good, it is fum and easy to make and drinking it stimulates a person's appetite

Here is a link to a great lemonade recipe





Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Lemon facts and trivia
* The lemon originated in China
* Lemonade was a favorite of the Chinese Emperors
* Lemons made their way to the United States with the help of Catholic Missionaries and were planted in Arizona and California? Today they produce virtually all of the lemons consumed in the United States as well as about one-third of those used throughout the world
(source The Packer Produce Availability & Merchandising Guide, 1999).

Lemons are valued for their many uses in flavoring the food we eat, as a garnish, and for household purposes.

Selection
Lemons should be firm and have a bright yellow color. Avoid soft, shriveled lemons with spots. The best lemons will be fine textured and heavy for their size. Thin skinned fruit tends to have more juice, while fruit that has a greenish cast is likely to be more acidic. One medium lemon has about 3 tablespoons of juice and 3 tablespoons of grated peel.

More lemon trivia