"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

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Saturday, December 29, 2012

January 4 is trivia day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very happy new year

Use this trivia as part of an activity


There are loads of sites on the internet where you can access trivia games for almost any subject you can think of by just Googling “Trivia.” However, I’ve come up with my own trivia questions. This is a great idea for a party game or for a “girls” lunch. Print these questions (and any you would like to add), make copies for everyone ahead of time with no name at the top. Cut them into strips and place them in a container. At the party or get-to-gather, for each question pulled have one person guess who’s answer it is. Keep score and have a prize for the person guessing the most correct answers.


(1) Where were you born?


(2) What is your favorite color?


(3) Do you have any tattoos? How many?


(4) What is your favorite all-time book?


(5) What is your favorite all-time movie?


(6) How many piercings do you have?


(7) What is your favorite TV Show?


(8) What is your favorite Dessert?


(9) Where did you do on your last vacation?


(10) What is the most obscure job you’ve ever had?


(11) Where have you lived that most don’t know about?


(12) If you had to choose one favorite food, what would it be?


(13) Where do you dream of going some day?


(14) What food do you hate the most?


(15) What is your favorite song of all times? Why?

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Melodic Memories Senior Sing-alongs

Singing Christmas Carols with friends and family is a favorite holiday pleasure. Here are three delightful DVDs designed specifically for seniors to sing along with. These are ideal for nursing homes and other assisted living facilities or for private in-home care.

The Christmas DVD has many of the best loved and well known 

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Christmas Songs, including: Hark the Herald Angels Sing, Come All Ye Faithful, Away in a Manger, Jingle Bells, Deck the Halls, Joy to the World, and many more. View a list of all of the songs included in the three DVDs.

Activity Director’s and in-home caregivers are finding the Melodic Memories sing-along videos provide entertainment, enjoyment, social interaction and stimulation to their senior residents. Even dementia sufferers who are otherwise quite unresponsive have shown very positive response and benefited greatly from the Melodic Memories series.

Lyrics are large enough to be read on screen, with black lettering on a white background. 

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

More easy movements for those with dementia



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Movements for the activity suggested in the January e-magazine of Activity Director Today

Anyone Can Do It
1.    Gently tap your head once
2.    Do you have two ears? Gently touch them.
What do you do with your ears?
What else do you have two of?
3.    Open and close your mouth three times.
      What do you do with your mouth?
      Name some thing inside your mouth.
4.  Count to four, four times.
5.  Do you have five fingers on each hand? Count them to see. Now wiggle your fingers
6. One two buckle my? Three four shut the? Five six pick up?
7.   Lap and Clap 7 times
8.    Rub your stomach 8 times
9.  Touch your Head Shoulders Knees and Knees again 9 times
10  Put either arm in and out 10 times
11. Pretend your arms are windshield wipers. It just started to rain. Move your arms back and fourth like windshield wipers 11 times
12. Pretend you are climbing a ladder while you count to 12

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

November is Alzheimer's Awareness Month



Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



November is Alzheimer's awareness month
What are you doing to find out all you can about this mind robbing disease and related dementias?
Visit this blog often to find out the latest news.
Here is what the president had to say
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America
During National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, we recognize the dignity and courage of the men and women living with Alzheimer's disease. We also honor the devoted family members and caretakers who bring them love and comfort, and we underscore our dedication to finding a cure for this tragic disease
...read the whole proclamation from 2011
Become an Alzheimer's advocate

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Apple Crafts for Those with Dementia



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Make sure you have a subscription to Activity Director Today to get helpful hints planning your activities

Apple card








This Apple Wall Hanging





Print a popular apple saying on a piece of paper

Enlarge it onto a 11x17 piece of paper.

The rest is pretty self explanatory. If you need a further explanation, leave a comment

Monday, September 24, 2012

Nursing home residents-Residents Rights Month

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals.Benevolant Society

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two




Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Theconsumervoice.org

Residents' Rights

Residents' Rights Overview


Residents’ Rights are guaranteed by the federal 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law. The law requires nursing homes to “promote and protect the rights of each resident” and places a strong emphasis on individual dignity and self-determination. Nursing homes must meet federal residents' rights requirements if they participate in Medicare or Medicaid. Some states have residents' rights in state law or regulation for nursing homes, licensed assisted living, adult care homes, and other board and care facilities. A person living in a long-term care facility maintains the same rights as an individual in the larger community.
View a Consumer Voice fact sheet on Residents' Rights.
Select on a below link to learn more about Residents' Rights.

What are Residents' Rights?


Residents' Rights Guarantee Quality of Life
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law requires each nursing home to care for its residents in a manner that promotes and enhances the quality of life of each resident, ensuring dignity, choice, and self-determination.
All nursing homes are required "to provide services and activities to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of each resident in accordance with a written plan of care that… is initially prepared, with participation, to the extent practicable, of the resident, the resident's family, or legal representative." This means a resident should not decline in health or well-being as a result of the way a nursing facility provides care.
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law protects the following rights of nursing home residents:
The Right to Be Fully Informed of
  • Available services and the charges for each service
  • Facility rules and regulations, including a written copy of resident rights
  • Address and telephone number of the State Ombudsman and state survey agency
  • State survey reports and the nursing home’s plan of correction
  • Advance plans of a change in rooms or roommates
  • Assistance if a sensory impairment exists
  • Residents have a right to receive information in a language they understand (Spanish, Braille, etc.)
Right to Complain
  • Present grievances to staff or any other person, without fear of reprisal and with prompt efforts by the facility to resolve those grievances
  • To complain to the ombudsman program
  • To file a complaint with the state survey and certification agency
Right to Participate in One's Own Care
  • Receive adequate and appropriate care
  • Be informed of all changes in medical condition
  • Participate in their own assessment, care-planning, treatment, and discharge
  • Refuse medication and treatment
  • Refuse chemical and physical restraints
  • Review one's medical record
  • Be free from charge for services covered by Medicaid or Medicare
Right to Privacy and Confidentiality
  • Private and unrestricted communication with any person of their choice
  • During treatment and care of one's personal needs
  • Regarding medical, personal, or financial affairs
Rights During Transfers and Discharges
  • Remain in the nursing facility unless a transfer or discharge:
  • (a) is necessary to meet the resident’s welfare;
  • (b) is appropriate because the resident’s health has improved and s/he no longer requires nursing home care;
  • (c) is needed to protect the health and safety of other residents or staff;
  • (d) is required because the resident has failed, after reasonable notice, to pay the facility charge for an item or service provided at the resident’s request
  • Receive thirty-day notice of transfer or discharge which includes the reason, effective date, location to which the resident is transferred or discharged, the right to appeal, and the name, address, and telephone number of the state long-term care ombudsman
  • Safe transfer or discharge through sufficient preparation by the nursing home
Right to Dignity, Respect, and Freedom
  • To be treated with consideration, respect, and dignity
  • To be free from mental and physical abuse, corporal punishment, involuntary seclusion, and physical and chemical restraints
  • To self-determination
  • Security of possessions
Right to Visits
  • By a resident’s personal physician and representatives from the state survey agency and ombudsman programs
  • By relatives, friends, and others of the residents' choosing
  • By organizations or individuals providing health, social, legal, or other services
  • Residents have the right to refuse visitors
Right to Make Independent Choices
  • Make personal decisions, such as what to wear and how to spend free time
  • Reasonable accommodation of one's needs and preferences
  • Choose a physician
  • Participate in community activities, both inside and outside the nursing home
  • Organize and participate in a Resident Council
  • Manage one's own financial affairs

Residents' Rights in Other Languages


The Center is pleased offer Residents' Rights in the following languages, English, French, Hindu, Korean (Illinois specific, not federal version) and Spanish. Select on the links below to access each version.
If you have a copy of Residents' Rights in a language not listed here and would like to share it with NORC, contact Becka Livesay, program associate, at rlivesay@theconsumervoice.org. Thank you!

National Residents' Rights Month 2012


Sunday, September 23, 2012

Book quotes for National Author's Day


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Book Quotes

National Author's Day is coming.Be prepared with these book quotes.
The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it. -James Bryce
Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book. -Unknown
There is a great deal of difference between an eager man who wants to read a book and a tired man who wants a book to read. -G.K. Chesterton
Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers. -Charles W. Eliot
The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can’t read them. -Mark Twain
Books let us into their souls and lay open to us the secrets of our own. -William Hazlitt
My test of a good novel is dreading to begin the last chapter. -Thomas Helm
The books which help you most are those which make you think most.  The hardest way of learning is by easy reading; but a great book that comes from a great thinker is a ship of thought, deep freighted with truth and beauty. -Theodore Parker
You know you’ve read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend. -Paul Sweeney
A book must be an ice-axe to break the seas frozen inside our soul. -Franz Kafka
Books are dangerous.  The best ones should be labeled “This could change your life.” -Helen Exley
Books are the glass of council to dress ourselves by. -Bulstrode Whitlock
Nothing is worth reading that does not require an alert mind. -Charles Dudley
To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting. -Edmund Burke
Books open your mind, broaden your mind, and strengthen you as nothing else can. -William Feather
A well-composed book is a magic carpet on which we are wafted to a world that we cannot enter in any other way. -Caroline Gordon
People get nothing out of books but what they bring to them. -George Bernard Shaw
Books are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance of generations and nations. -Henry David Thoreau
Books give not wisdom where none was before. But where some is, there reading makes it more. -Elizabeth Hardwick
Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else. -Mark Twain
Any thoughts about book quotes…or just thoughts about books?  Please share in the comment section below.   

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Wear purple tomorrow


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Alzheimer's Association

This week, show your support of the fight against Alzheimer’s disease by going purple! Friday is Alzheimer’s Action Day, an opportunity to support the Alzheimer’s Association® and help raise awareness of this devastating disease during World Alzheimer’s Month.
On Sept. 21, wear purple, the color of the Alzheimer’s movement, to honor the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and the millions more who care for them. Here are some ways you can go purple and take action:

Wear your support! 
Pull out your purple and wear it with pride. Need more gear?
• Check out our shirts, wrist bands and other purple items at Shop for a Cause.
• This month, CJ Free is proud to introduce a limited edition bracelet to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. In recognition of World Alzheimer’s Month, 20% of the sales price of bracelets sold from now until September 30 will benefit the Association.
Make a winning bid! 
Take part in two eBay auctions running through Sept. 27 to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association:
• Win a guitar signed by legendary singer Glen Campbell - now touring the country - who is living with Alzheimer’s disease.
• Meet Celebrity Champion Seth Rogen as a VIP guest at the "Hilarity for Charity" fundraising event next spring.
In addition, eBay will feature the Alzheimer’s Association from September 17-23, and users will have the option to donate $1 or more at checkout to the Alzheimer’s Association when buying and selling on eBay.
Watch “Who Wants to be a Millionaire!”
Watch the week of Sept. 17 to see contestants compete on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Association. Spread the word and ask your friends and family to tune in.
Share on social media!
Talk about World Alzheimer’s Month and Alzheimer’s Action Day on your social networks. Turn Facebook purple by changing your profile picture to our END ALZ icon. And become a fan of the Alzheimer’s Association on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and join our community board on Pinterest.
Raise awareness!
Because of misinformation or confusion, some people may hold those with Alzheimer’s disease and their families at arm’s length. But by educating others about the reality of Alzheimer’s, we can dispel the misconceptions. Speak up and tell others why you support the cause.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Become an enrolled agent for the IRS


Activity director, health care and other professionals, have you considered a career or a part time job to supplement your income?

You can become a tax preparer, or an enrolled agent. In order to become an enrolled agent you must take an exam with multiple portions. To learn all this information on your own can be a difficult task. Why not use the enrolled agent exam preparation. It is well worth the money. After you pass the exam, you will need to maintain your certification. In order to maintain this certification with the IRS, you must take continuing education courses.

There are enrolled agent continuing education requirements that you must meet so consider entering into this professional area carefully. The IRS requires that you have a minimum of 16 continuing professional education hours a year or 72 hours every three years.

When fulfilling these requirements for the enrolled agent continuing education, you want to be able to have flexibility and financially affordable options especially if you want to take a significant number of courses.

Of course each course must meet certain standards. Thus you as an enrolled agent want to learn new information in an easy to understand format. You want to be able to see what information will be covered before you have to pay for it and you want to see how you are progressing in your quest to fulfill all the requirements.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

A great way to supplement your income


Activities directors, healthcare professionals and others looking to supplement their income or move into a new career.

Let’s face it. The healthcare industry is extremely taxing on you mentally and possibly physically. While the rewards can be personally satisfying, the reality is you may not be making enough to pay your bills.

If you want to keep your hands in the healthcare industry and branch out into another area to provide you with some extra income, consider energy auditor training. What is energy auditor training you ask.

Simply put, it is becoming an energy efficiency expert. Some people call this grren training r becoming a green energy expert. You have experience in being an expert in the healthcare field you are in. Now you can get your resnet certification.

You could also learn about renewal energy. This is what everyone wants these days. Yes you can become a green energy expert with your green certification.

It will not take you that much time. You can learn around your schedule and you will have a great income source when you are done.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

More about activities and dementia


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Crisisprevention.com

1. All activities, even unplanned ones, can be meaningful. Activities don’t have to fit in a box on a calendar or whiteboard, and they don’t have to be held at intentionally carved-out hourly intervals throughout the day. There are countless opportunities for activities often right beneath the noses of all dementia care unit staff. Making the bed. Meal time. Watering the plants. Tidying up the room. Each of these things, small and simple though they seem, can provide rich opportunities for engaging a resident who is perhaps not interested in bingo, movies, or other group activities.

2. Simplify your schedule, routine, and approach; always adapt. I always found that the simpler the activity, the better it was for everyone (including the activity director, who is nearly always pressed for time and resources). That doesn’t mean dumbing things down, it means stripping away the nonessentials and getting to the heart of what makes a successful activity: meaningful interactions and purposeful occupation. Want to host an afternoon tea? Great. Don’t burn yourself out trying to find the daintiest napkins, the prettiest tea service, or the most prestigious teas. Cups, spoons, tea, condiments, napkins, and scones are all you really need. Also, don’t try to set it all up on your own. Get the residents to help you prepare for the event so they feel a sense of ownership about the activity. Discover that no one in the group particularly likes tea? Don’t take it personally—just adapt—and bring out a pot of coffee.

3. Engage the residents. I remember walking through the halls of that first community where I served, arm-in-arm with one of the residents, who only spoke Spanish. We would have lovely conversations, even though I didn’t speak or understand Spanish. Consequently, she did most of the talking, but I listened actively. I did my best to match her emotions (if she frowned or looked angry when she spoke, I frowned too; if she seemed to be asking a question, I would nod or shake my head in agreement or support) so that she could feel comfortable about speaking freely. I think those walks may have been among the few times that she was really and truly engaged with anyone in the wing, and I was happy to foster that opportunity for her, even though “walking the halls with residents” wasn’t listed on my daily activities planner.

4. Do some field research. Talk to the family members and friends who come to visit. Talk to the residents themselves. Find out what they enjoyed doing before they moved to the facility, and organize your programming efforts accordingly.

5. Use peer mentors. In most Alzheimer’s care facilities, residents will be in varying stages of dementia at any given time. If you’re doing a group activity, consider pairing up residents who are still in the earlier stages with those who may be further into the disease process. Be sure that their personalities complement each other so that you don’t create unnecessary conflict or tension. This is an approach used often in Montessori-based dementia programming that works well in terms of engaging and empowering both the mentor and the mentee.

6. Do intergenerational activities whenever possible. Music therapy and pet therapy programs are quite successful means for getting people who rarely smile or speak to light up and communicate, but bring a baby, a toddler, or any young child into the room and everyone, everything else disappears. Deep connections are made; the presence of the young life sparks something in the residents that no other activity can match.



Thursday, August 23, 2012

More about Aviation Day


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

More useful information about Aviation Day

·         Has anyone has ever been on an airplane and have them explain it? If they haven't been on one, have them tell what they think it might be like         

Name some things that can fly

Compose a poem or story about airplanes, the Wright Brothers, or Aviation Day with your audience.

Have your residents design a paper airplane, draw one or color one in.




Monday, August 20, 2012

Financing for your organization


Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and others involved in companies or investors in the chemical and related material, here is some information you will find useful.

As a company or investor dealing with chemicals you know you have very specific items you need to keep in mind when trying to find financing for your organization.

You want a company or a chemical investment bank who is familiar with all aspects of this specific type of investment from environmental issues to chemical mergers and acquisitions.

You want a chemical advisory who has informed reliable advice because of experience with takeover attempts, ideal valuation for clients, and unique industry experience that helps their clients get the best banking, financial, and safe advice.

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

The farmer and the stork

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

The Farmer and the Stork

A FARMER placed nets on his newly-sown plowlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. "Pray save me, Master," he said, "and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane." The Farmer laughed aloud and said, "It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company."
Birds of a feather flock togethe

Monday, August 13, 2012

Easy farm animal origami


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Subscribe to the Activity Director Today E-Magazine to find out about a farm animal origami activity

Check out these You Tube videos for simple farm animal origami

You Tube





Saturday, August 11, 2012

Ltst of farrn animals


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Subscribe to the Activity Director Today E-Magazine to find out why these words are important

  • ant
  • bull
  • calf
  • cat
  • chicken









      • cow
      • dog
      • donkey
      • duck
      • earthworm
      • frog
        • goat
        goose
    • hen
    • horse
    • lamb
    pig
  • rooster
  • sheep
  • turkey
  • young......
  • Thursday, August 9, 2012

    Famous pigs

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two



    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

    Wikipedia

    Freddy the Pig is the central figure in a series of 26 books written between 1927 and 1958 by American author Walter R. Brooks, and illustrated by Kurt Wiese. Consisting of 25 novels and one poetry collection, they focus on the adventures of a group of animals living on a farm in rural upstate New York.
    Freddy is introduced as "the smallest and cleverest" of the pigs on the Bean farm. He becomes the central character shortly into the series. Freddy's interests drive the books as he becomes a detective, politician, newspaper editor, magician, pilot, and other vocations or avocations. A recurring villain is the slimy but dignified Simon, who leads a gang of criminal rats. Human characters include Mr. and Mrs. Bean, who own the farm, and the population of local Centerboro, and human villains.
    Brooks created his animals for To and Again (1927) (later retitled Freddy Goes to Florida). It took some time before their personalities — and their ability to talk to humans when they chose — were fully developed.
    In the remainder of the series, the animals of the Bean Farm lead a highly developed life, variously operating a bank, a newspaper, the First Animal Republic, and Freddy's detective business, which follows the principles of Sherlock Holmes as Freddy knows them from his reading.
    Much of the humor in the books derives from the self-referential way in which the author acknowledges the unreality of talking animals, unlike other children's works in which they are accepted as normal. The Bean Farm animals have attained national fame for their ability to talk and read, and the humans they encounter are taken aback at first (though only momentarily) to find themselves conversing with animals. Although the animals and humans do not age, the stories reflect the social conditions at the time of writing, for example, the books published during World War II have scrap drives and victory gardens.
    Charlotte's Web is a children's novel by American author E. B. White, about a pig named Wilbur and his spider friend Charlotte, who saves him from slaughter. The book was first published in 1952, with illustrations by Garth Williams.
    The novel tells the story of a pig named Wilbur and his friendship with a barn spidernamed Charlotte. When Wilbur is in danger of being slaughtered by the farmer, Charlotte writes messages praising Wilbur (such as "Some Pig") in her web in order to persuade the farmer to let him live.
    Written in White's dry, low-key manner, Charlotte's Web is considered a classic of children's literature, enjoyable to adults as well as children. The description of the experience of swinging on a rope swing at the farm is an often cited example of rhythm in writing, as the pace of the sentences reflects the motion of the swing. Publishers Weeklylisted the book as the best-selling children's paperback of all time as of 2000