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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Fun facts to share: New Years


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information



Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



The History of New Year's Resolutions

The tradition of the New Year's Resolutions goes all the way back to 153 B.C. Janus, a mythical king of early Rome was placed at the head of the calendar.

With two faces, Janus could look back on past events and forward to the future. Janus became the ancient symbol for resolutions and many Romans looked for forgiveness from their enemies and also exchanged gifts before the beginning of each year.

The New Year has not always begun on January 1, and it doesn't begin on that date everywhere today. It begins on that date only for cultures that use a 365-day solar calendar. January 1 became the beginning of the New Year in 46 B.C., when Julius Caesar developed a calendar that would more accurately reflect the seasons than previous calendars had.

The Romans named the first month of the year after Janus, the god of beginnings and the guardian of doors and entrances. He was always depicted with two faces, one on the front of his head and one on the back. Thus he could look backward and forward at the same time. At midnight on December 31, the Romans imagined Janus looking back at the old year and forward to the new. The Romans began a tradition of exchanging gifts on New Year's Eve by giving one another branches from sacred trees for good fortune.

Later, nuts or coins imprinted with the god Janus became more common New Year's gifts.
In the Middle Ages, Christians changed New Year's Day to December 25, the birth of Jesus. Then they changed it to March 25, a holiday called the Annunciation. In the sixteenth century, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar, and the celebration of the New Year was returned to January 1.

The Julian and Gregorian calendars are solar calendars. Some cultures have lunar calendars, however. A year in a lunar calendar is less than 365 days because the months are based on the phases of the moon. The

Chinese use a lunar calendar. Their new year begins at the time of the first full moon (over the Far East) after the sun enters Aquarius- sometime between January 19 and February 21.

Although the date for New Year's Day is not the same in every culture, it is always a time for celebration and for customs to ensure good luck in the coming year.

Ancient New Years

The celebration of the New Year is the oldest of all holidays. It was first observed in ancient Babylon about 4000 years ago. In the years around 2000 BC, Babylonians celebrated the beginning of a new year on what is now March 23, although they themselves had no written calendar.

Late March actually is a logical choice for the beginning of a new year. It is the time of year that spring begins and new crops are planted. January 1, on the other hand, has no astronomical nor agricultural significance. It is purely arbitrary.

The Babylonian New Year celebration lasted for eleven days. Each day had its own particular mode of celebration, but it is safe to say that modern New Year's Eve festivities pale in comparison.

The Romans continued to observe the New Year on March 25, but their calendar was continually tampered with by various emperors so that the calendar soon became out of synchronization with the sun. In order to set the calendar right, the Roman senate, in 153 BC, declared January 1 to be the beginning of the New Year. But tampering continued until Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, established what has come to be known as the Julian Calendar. It again established January 1 as the New Year. But in order to synchronize the calendar with the sun, Caesar had to let the previous year drag on for 445 days.

Sunday, December 25, 2016

MERRY CHRISTMAS or HAPPY CHANUKAH

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition


To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very merry Christmas.

Try to relax on Christmas day. Enjoy the holiday. Remember it is not just about giving gifts, but more importantly, it is about being with family and friends and taking pleasure in their company.

It is about remembering the good times and forgetting the bad. It is about letting go of useless grudges.

It is about enjoying the moment because with dementia, that is all you may get. Remember to create your own moments of joy so you and your dementia friends can have the most joyous holiday possible

Thank you all for making “Activities Director” a stop on your blogging journey. In the days to come, I will be discussing more information about dementia that you will find most helpful. See you soon and…..

MERRY CHRISTMAS or HAPPY CHANUKAH

From Susan Berg author of Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful Mind Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

How to Prevent Christmas Stress

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very merry Christmas.

eHow
wesellforum

Christmas is a festive time of year. Everyone is rushing from place to place and so happy. Among all that Christmas cheer there are people that allow themselves to get so stressed out they never get to enjoy the holiday season. With a little effort and planning you can prevent holiday stress from creeping up on you and your family. Below are some things you can do to help prevent Christmas stress.

Step 1Make Christmas Gift List Early:

Sit down early in fall or late summer to make your Christmas list. The earlier you can get started on your Christmas list the less stressful and hectic it will be at Christmas time. This also gives you plenty of time to think about what you want to get everyone.

Step 2Plan your gift choices in advance:

Save time and stress while shopping by having your Christmas gift list done early. You can always make changes if necessary but there is no reason you shouldn’t have an idea of what to get everyone before you start shopping. Family members or people that are close to you should get gifts with more thought and uniqueness while acquaintances and friends can have smaller generic gifts that are easier to find. These are usually gift baskets that can serve this purpose.

Step 3Buy gifts as early as possible:

Christmas gifts don’t have to have anything to do with Christmas so you can really start your Christmas shopping early. This will allow you to find better bargains for everyone on your list and avoid the Stressful last minute shoppers in the stores.

Step 4Gifts in bulks are good for acquaintances:

Buying several of the same item will make gift giving less stressful also. Many items can be customized at home for next to nothing. If you find a good deal on an item ask the store owner if you can get a discount for buying several of that item. Once home either add a card of a little verse that is special to you and your gift if unique and done for several people at once.

Step 5Limit holiday activities:

Make a list of priorities and make sure other activities do not interfere. Make sure you have some me time included in there so you don’t make your self sick with all the running. That’s not to say you shouldn’t enjoy the holiday season, just make sure you are enjoying it and not rushing from activity to activity through it.

Step 6Relax with family:

Christmas is all about family and you should make sure you have plenty of time set aside to enjoy it with your family. Don’t feel bad if you have to say no to someone to spend time with your family. They really will understand.

Step 7Ask for help if needed:

There are many people that will help you will small tasks when times get busy and stressful. Make sure you ask for help with things seem to be getting over whelming. Having someone help wrap presents is not only a way to get something done that needs to be done and could be stressful. It’s a way to relieve stress that is starting to build up by relaxing with family and friends. Plus you get to check one more thing off your to do list.

Help those with dementia dream of an"old fashioned" Christmas

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very merry Christmas.

K. Ellis

Favorite Christmas Movies
Published by kyellis at 1:19 pm under Handmade Gifts, Holiday Edit This

I’ve always dreamed of an “old fashioned” Christmas with popcorn and cranberry strings on the tree. One when all the gifts under the tree were handmade by the giver and I made all the pies and Christmas cookies. In fact, I’ve had close as I could get to that experience. It was wonderful, except for my total exhaustion. You see, it was my dream, but no one else’s. And, I was the only one making all my gifts and food and tree strings.

Anyway, I haven’t given up completely on an “old fashioned” Christmas. I do something every year that makes me feel like I still have a connection to that dream. I always try to make a gift or two and I usually make the Christmas dinner, especially if it’s just my husband and myself. However, years ago I added my own more modern holiday tradition.

There are certain Christmas movies I watch every year in the days leading up to Christmas. I watch “It’s a Wonderful Life” and “Miracle on 34th Street” even though there are two versions now. I like both. If I can find the modern version of “Little Women” I add that to the list. And if there is a new one out that I think I might like, I try it and see if it needs to be added to the list. I saw “Polar Express” and am seriously considering adding it to the list.

Famous and Popular Christmas Movies

It’s a Wonderful Life
Miracle on 34th Street
Little Women (Is this a Christmas movie? There’s Christmas in it)
The Polar Express
The Bishop’s Wife (Cary Grant)
Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer
Santa Clause is Coming to Town
A Christmas Carol
How the Grinch Stole Christmas
A Charlie Brown Christmas
The Year Without a Santa Clause
White Christmas
Frosty the Snowman
Scrooged (with Bill Murray)
Elf
Babes in Toyland

Which one’s of your favorites did I miss?

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Strategies for Having An Enjoyable Christmas With Those Who Have Dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter






We all benefit from sharing
Christmas with someone we care about. The smells, the
sounds, and the sights bring back happy memories. People
with dementia should have this opportunity too. Following
these tips will ensure you and your loved one with Alzheimer’s
disease or another dementia a pleasurable holiday season.
Use these tips ti help you choose a gift they will enjoy now and
in days and months to come.
The gift of yourself is one of the
best gifts you can give so do
things together.
One thing you can do is decorate for Christmas together
There is nothing like the excitement of preparing for the Christmas holiday
together.
In order to make the decorating experience for someone with Alzheimer’s
disease or a related dementia, better, follow these tips:
Have most of the decorating complete before you involve the dementia
person. Then they can help you with the finishing touches.
Buy unbreakable ornaments. They are much safer. However, if your
dementia friend likes to put inedible objects in his mouth, do not use any
ornaments
Do not use candy canes or any edible decorations on the tree. Do not use ones that even look edible
What safe things can you use?
In most cases, garland is safe
Angels made out of material are most likely appropriate.
Here is another activity you do together. Make ornaments out of old Christmas cards, together...
Cut out the pictures on the front. Punch a hole near the top of the picture and put string or ribbon through
the hole. You can then hang these homemade ornaments on the tree.
You know the person with Alzheimer’s disease the best. You know what is most likely appropriate.
You can have two trees. Keep the room to the one with the traditional decorations locked unless you or
someone can supervise the person with dementia.
Here is something else you can do together. You can have the person with dementia put Christmas
window clings up. You and the dementia person can display unbreakable Christmas knickknacks.
Yet another idea is to make a tree out of paper and display pictures from past Christmases. This is not
only fun to look at, but it is a great opportunity for reminiscing. This kind if tree is very safe
Share in the joy of the decorations of others
If decorating is too much for you, or you feel that your decorations are not safe, or you want something
wonderful to do, you can drive around town spotting all the decorations families, merchants, schools, town
centers and libraries are displaying. Stay away from crowded malls, however.
Sing favorite Christmas carols often
Most families have favorite songs they sing. Even if a person with Alzheimer’s disease or another
dementia is non verbal, he or she may be able to sing most of the words to a favorite song. Singing is a
great activity. It lifts spirits and is good for the lungs.
Pray with them.
Most folks with dementia have strong ties to their religion. Even those with advanced dementia may
spontaneously recite portions of a prayer service that was part of their past.
The problem may be to find a service that is appropriate. The traditional service is long and crowded.
Here are a few suggestions
Go at the beginning or end of the service. That is when the least amount of parishioners are in
attendance.
Contact some assisted living or nursing homes in the area. Many of them have short simple services
highlighting the important prayers. This is a win, win situation. You can see what a place is like, and most.......read all of Strategies for Having An Enjoyable Christmas With Those Who Have Dementia

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Have a Merry Christmas with those with have dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


ezine

Over 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Buying a gift for them for the holidays is not difficult if you keep a few things in mind.
First you should know the persons likes and dislikes. Also important is knowing their strengths and weaknesses. In addition consider, when purchasing a gift for someone with dementia, keeping their mind and body active. Also think about a gift that will keep on giving long after Christmas, Chanukah, Kwanza or other celebrated holidays are gone Keep in mind, also, that gift selections should change as Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, progress
Gifts that keep dementia persons' mind active
All stages, most interests
A book called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful Mind Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals is an ideal gift because just about everyone loves babies. This book uses baby photographs to engage those with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia in mind stimulating activities. Also it has great tips and resources for caregivers and health care workers.
A journal
Anytime is a good time to record happy events or moments in a dementias persons' life. Spend some time with them after you give this gift helping them to record memorable moments. Let them write as much as they can and you do the rest.
Then later these happenings can be shared.
A photo album
You or someone who has photographs of dementia persons can put them into an album. Make sure to label the photos so recall of them will be easier.
You may want to enlarge some of the photos for easier viewing.
As the dementia progresses, Alzheimer's individuals may think recent photos of them are of their mother or father. That is OK because this gives all a wonderful opportunity to talk about their parents.
Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD. No matter what stage of dementia they are in they will enjoy watching something from the good old days and singing the songs played throughout the picture. Here are a few suggestions: Singin' in the Rain, Meet Me in St. Louis, or Shall We Dance
Next is a sing a long CD or audio cassette of their favorite songs. There is a series of these called, Old Time Favorites by Nancy Pitkin.
You may want to get a sing a long video where dementia persons can see and hear performers singing songs they love. Folks with Alzheimer's disease seem to enjoy music from their younger days. Many times dementia folks who are non-verbal will sing many of the words of an old favorite song of theirs. A good one is: Sing-Along with Phil Bernardi: Songs We Know and Love.
Give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit persons with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, they will appreciate your company even though they may not be able to express it. Take them for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or give them a hand massage. Just share some quality time together. All will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting. No arguing, please. That is a lose, lose situation.
A phone call, especially a long distance call is nice. Those in the later stages may have trouble with this especially if they are hard of hearing. However, at least they will know you are thinking of them.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Top Appropriate HOLIDAY Gifts For Those With Dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter



To all the readers of this blog who are eager to learn more about dementia, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a very merry Christmas.


Here are gifts to buy for loved ones or clients with dementia. Here is an article that will help you, other healthcare professionals and caregivers
prlog
Christmas,Chanukah and alike are the perfect chance to give gifts that are not only enjoyable but also are beneficial to persons with Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia. These presents keep on giving long after the holiday season is gone
First on the list of gifts is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.


Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a....read the whole article

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Fairy Tale Songs


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition

The best album I could find is Disney Princess: Fairy Tale Songs

Here are the songs on the CD


1 Mandy Moore2:34
2 Anika Noni Rose2:26
3 Jodi Benson3:14
4 Robby Benson / Angela Lansbury / Paige O'HaraJerry Orbach / David Ogden Stiers2:19
5 Lea Salonga2:26
6 Zachary Levi / Mandy Moore3:46
7 Anika Noni Rose2:52
8 Ilene Woods4:36
9 Judy Kuhn2:43
10 Anika Noni Rose2:29
11 Angela Lansbury2:46
12 Adriana Caselotti3:08
13 Mary Costa1:32
14 Shannon Saunders2:53
15[CD-Rom Track]
You can also get CDs of individual fairy tale sound tracks such as 


You can also visit Disney Song Lyrics for more fairy tale songs



Monday, December 12, 2016

How to Deal With a Difficult Nursing Home Resident

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Jae Ireland

Step 1Check with the resident's doctor to rule out any medical reason as to why he would be acting out, such as Alzheimer's disease. It may be a medical condition that can be remedied with therapy or medication. Once a medical cause is rule out, you can focus on other ways to cope.

Step 2Take the time to get to know the resident. What are her likes and dislikes? What things can calm her easily? What type of past does she have? Taking the time to get to know the resident may create a special bond for you, resulting in a calmer and happier resident.

Step 3Engage the resident in activities that he enjoys. Take special care that he is invited to nursing home events and outings, as well as individual activities such as reading or working in the arts. Taking the resident's mind off of his surroundings and circumstances may result in a less difficult resident.

Step 4Make sure that the resident has plenty of visitors. Residents can sometimes become difficult when they are bored or feel like they are forgotten. If there isn't family around to visit the resident, try asking for volunteers in your community to come for a visit two or three times a week.

Step 5Discourage bad behavior by not rewarding it. Make sure to not respond with a reaction or anger. Instead be patient with the resident, and try and see things from her point of view

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Links to popular fairy tales

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Fairy Tales by the Brothers Grimm
Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
Fairy Tales by Charles Perrault

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Dice games for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

In December, we celebrate Dice day.Why not take some suggestions from this article

Large dice are a useful tool when it comes to designing and playing games with those who have dementia. This is particularly true if the person or persons in question liked to play games using dice before they had this
There are several things you should keep in mind before and during the designing and playing of dice games or any games for that matter when it comes to people with dementia.


Although it may be fun for some to have winners and losers, it is best not to emphasize this, but rather the fun of the game complimenting those who try their best to play.


Also introduce one game at time. Then play this game for several weeks before trying another similar game. If the games are quite a bit different, you may be able to introduce more than one at a time. Always follow the KISS rule. That is keep it as simple as possible.


You should you play dice games for several reasons Dice games are fun. Dice games have been played for years. Thus many people with dementia find dice games familiar. Familiar is always good when you are doing something with those who have dementia.
Dice games are extremely versatile. Some dice games rely on luck, and some use skill and planning. Some games use a combination of both. You can find dice games to play with one player or a whole group of players. There are dice games you can play on a table or on the floor.


Dice games can be based on many things. Residents may have to be lucky, or they may have to rely on their skill and ability to plan. Residents of all ages and mental abilities can play and enjoy dice games. This is especially important because now many facilities have younger residents and with only the need for a mild suggestion, your residents will want to partake in a dice game. You can find games to play with two players or twenty players, You can play them using a table or the floor,

Dice games are mind stimulating. They are mind stimulating in obvious ways because people have to count or do quick mental addition. But they are also reinforce the concept of taking turns, keeping score, winning and losing gracefully, playing without keeping score as well as many other things.
Dice games are portable. You can always find room for a few dice in an activity cart in your pocket, on a unit for staff members to use with residents or in a resident’s room. You can “pre-package” some dice with a stack of print- outs, plain paper and pencils. Put the dice and any other necessary equipment in a resealable plastic bag or box.

Dice games are personally satisfying.. Most people love the look and feel of dice. They like the versatility of dice game and the quickness of a dice game

Dice are cheap. You probably have a number of interesting dice in existing games, and you can certainly buy more very cheaply at a dollar store. You can make your own dice using varying sizes of cardboard boxes, white paper, dark paper or other interesting material to make the dots, a scissors and glue or tape. For some ideas on how to make dice go to

Dice games are plentiful. There are so many games you can play with just one di. A simple game to use as a filler is to have each participant roll the di to see who gets the highest number. You can have more than one round where you can have a winner for each round or the scores can be cumulative where you can have a scorekeeper or the residents can keep their own score. You can do the same thing with two or three dice. You could have a list of six things to do. Each time a group member throws a certain number, he has to do what is in the list for that number. For ideas as to what to put on the list go to

Another easy dice game is to have each number represent a part of something like an animal or object. The object is divided into six parts and each part has a number. The object is for each participant to roll each number so the whole object is made. To make it more difficult, the parts must be gotten in order. You cannot get one part until you get the part before it. For an example of this go to
Since December is a holiday month, play a dice game that relates to the holidays. You can make an adapted dreydl that looks sort of like a di with Hebrew letters on it.
Using the ideas on how to make a di, instead of putting dots on it, you could put Christmas symbols on it or make it in red or green or both. 
Encourage your residents make up their own games. You can help them of course. Then play the game(s) that have been made up.
Dice games can be quick or they can take a ling time. Pick a game for your audience that matches their needs, preferences, and time allotment.

Search this blog for more about dice games

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

December 12 is Poinsettia Day

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition] 

December 12 is Poinsettia Day. I like to buy bushes of silk Poinsettia stems,
cut the stems up with a wire cutter and distribute one or more to the
residents. This is a great gift and prop to give to a resident who gets 1:1
visits. It shows caring and can start a great discussion of the Poinsettia
plant. You can buy silk Poinsettia bushes at the dollar store or at Walmart.

You can also do a simple flower arranging project with the cut silk Poinsettia
stems and distribute the finished arrangement to some room bound
residents or you can give them as prizes at another activity.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Classic Fairy tales to read to those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

To go along with National Tell a Fairy Tale Day, here is a list of fairy tales and links to them that residents with dementia or other long term care residents will enjoy

Friday, December 2, 2016

December is Hi Neighbor Month


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two



There are more words on this video even though it is with Barney


Here are words to the song Hi Neighbor


spoken
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Whadaya know
And whadaya say
Hi, Neighbor!
Hi, Neighbor!
Throw all your worries away
Come on and shake my hand
And let a grin do the rest
It makes you feel so grand
To get your chin off your chest
And shout
"Hi, Neighbor!"
My Neighbor
Time to play
And say "Hi!"
Never, never, never wear a frown
Or let yourself get down
Just take a minute
And you'll all begin it
Hi, Hi, Neighbor!
(Instrumental interlude)
(spoken)
Well, Hiya, Neighbor!
Ah ... Howdy, Partner!
Whadaya know
And whadaya say
Hey!
(spoken)
Hi, Neighbor!
Why ... ah, Howdy, Partner!
Throw your worries
Away for a day
Come on and shake my hand
And let a grin do the rest
It makes you feel so grand
To get your chin off your chest
I'm shoutin' to ya
"Hi, Hi, Neighbor!"
My Neighbor
Time to play
And say "Hi, Neighbor!"
Hi, Neighbor!
Keep the chin up
Light the grin up
Follow right up with
"Hi!"

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

How to Motivate A Nursing Home Resident

Kathleen Milazzo

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Motivating A Nursing Home Resident

Step 1 Introduce yourself as a staff member or volunteer and ask if they mind you visiting with them awhile.

Step 2 Strike up a conversation and don't be afraid to ask them what brought them to live in the home. As they begin to talk about their situations you will start learning more about their pasts and what things they might be interested in. You can mention for instance if they used to go to play bingo, that bingo games are held in the home and ask if they would be interested in going. Offer to come and pick them up and escort them to the game.

Step 3 When residents say they don't want to join in activities ask if they would at least come out of the room for awhile and watch the game. Assure them you will come and get them and bring them back to their rooms afterward.

Step 4 If they don't want to go at all ask if they would mind daily visits from you. During these visits you can offer to bring some activity they like for just the two of you to participate in. You can also gently drop hints while your visiting about joining in the group activities.

Step 5 If they refuse even visits saying they want to be left alone, insist that you have to come even if it's just to pop your head in and say hello. Once in awhile a resident will tell you that they are just too sick or in too much pain to be bothered. If that's the case, respect their wishes and offer to leave something of interest in their room in case they change their mind. Use gentle prodding and don't give up. Talk to the nursing department about enlisting their help in motivating the resident, and let them know how the resident is feeling.