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Thursday, January 28, 2016

Sensational ideas for those with dementia and other nursing home residents(Part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

USA Today

Smell
Thanks to nimble noses, babies know the scent of their mothers at birth, food tastes a lot better, and the mere act of sniffing men's sweat relaxes us (and may make us more fertile). Our sense of smell also keeps us safe from everything from fire (is that smoke I smell?) to spoiled food (sour milk -- eww).
Smell also plays a key role in mood and memory. Just getting a whiff of Granny's chicken soup or a steaming cup of hot chocolate can immediately evoke an emotion or an image from our past. That's because, more than any other sense, the sense of smell is irrational.
"A smell affects us emotionally," says Alan Hirsch, M.D., neurological director of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago. "When we detect an odor in the air, we decide if we like it before we even identify it. You can be going about your day one moment, and the next moment, be on the verge of tears -- all because of a fragrance."
When your sense of smell is at its peak, you have about 10 million olfactory receptors, and your nose and brain can distinguish among 10,000 to 30,000 smells. But as we age, "we experience loss of sensitivity and deterioration in our receptors, which are responsible for getting messages to the brain to process smell," says Richard Doty, Ph.D., director of the Smell and Taste Center at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. But a little practice can improve your sense of smell.
Sniff a pick-me-up. When the clock strikes 4, and you start to wane, take a nice whiff of peppermint candy. Scents such as peppermint and cinnamon increase the brain waves in the front of your head, which helps keep you awake and alert. Lemon or eucalyptus in your morning shower gives you the same kind of fragrant wake-up call.
Be different. "By bombarding your nose with a series of different scents for a few minutes each day, you can create new receptors," Hirsch says. Why not try this with wine? Open a few varietals of vino, and breathe deeply. Try to detect the various notes, from sweet to strong. Soothe with scent. Before heading off to bed, relax with scented candles, bubbles, or aromatherapy oils. Try lavender or chamomile in the bath or shower, where the warm water and humidity will increase the volatility of a scent; both herbs inhibit the area of the brain that keeps you awake.
Stop smoking. Cigarette smoke kills off those essential olfactory receptors, whether you're the one smoking or not. Since indoor smoking was banned, there's been a resurgence in our sense of smell.

Come back for more

Friday, January 22, 2016

More sensory ideas for those who are non verbal with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition] 

We want to Include a non verbal person with dementia in the conversation in some way
Here are a few ways to do it
Say," I know (non verbal person's name) likes (whatever.) I can tell by his/her smile." or
Give an expected answer and say that is what (the non verbal person) would say if he/she could talk
Then gently squeeze the non verbal peron's hand or rub his back.
You may want to give this person a sensory object to hold.
Studues have shown that doing this will ground this type of person and actually can arouse him/her if the person os lethatgic or calm his/her down if mild agitation is present
What kinds of objects can you  use?

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Making Apple Butter: A Sweet Sensory Treat

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Simple Recipes

This recipe makes a sweet treat that smells so good. It is sure to wake up anybody's senses. It is easy to make and nutritious.

Here is the recipe:

Apple Butter
3 1/2 cups apple sauce,
sugar, (the formula is: sugar equal to half the amount of applesauce) Use sugar substitute for folks who are diabetic
A heaping tablespoon of cinnamon,
Half a teaspoon of cloves ( optional)
Cook it on low all day in a
crock pot!

This is especially good to make on a cold day. The aroma of it cooking is a true sensory experience.



Sunday, January 10, 2016

No bake easy Hamantaschen recipe

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


ReformJudism
Hamantaschen doesn't have to be difficult to make! Here's a way to let your residents make their own.
Ingredients: 
Soft, pliable whole wheat or white bread
Jam, soft butter, cheese spread, or peanut butter
Directions: 
Take soft, pliable slices of bread and use a large, round cookie cutter to cut out circles. Then, using a spoon or butter knife, fill the center with one or two of the above toppings. Pinch into a triangular, hamantaschen shape

Monday, January 4, 2016

Programming Ideas: National Activity Professionals Week

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Courtesy of National Association of Activity Professionals

   
Educate and show everyone in your homes how your activity department
provides Oceans of possibilities for your Elders.


Programming Ideas:
Activities: “Oceans of Possibilities”
Educate and show everyone in your homes how your activity department
provides Oceans of possibilities for your Elders.
The possibilities of keeping traditions.
_ Talk with the Elders about family traditions and your facility
traditions
The possibility to win.
_ Have a special Bingo using pictures or words relating to
activities.
The possibility of making friends.
_ Have a tea,
_ create a “Getting to know you Bingo” (see example)
_ have a staff / Elder scavenger hunt (using activity items as the
items to find)
_ Starting a Post Card Pen Pal Program to write to Nursing Home
Elders in other cities.
The possibility to socialize and try new things.
_ host a special dinner party serving different kinds of food
_ Host a happy hour with different types of drinks
The possibility to serve others.
_ make Sandwiches for a local shelter
_ have a food drive (this time of year is usually a lean time for food
banks so they will appreciate even more)
The possibility to explore past interest and be creative.
_ Crafts
_ Creative Writing
The possibility to stay in touch with the community.
_ Plan out trips
The possibility to LET GO.
_ Be a kid again for just an hour or so ( see attached).
_ show off your talent & lack of at Karaoke.
The possibility to learn something new.
_ Learn how to write and say your name in another language
o Chinese http://www.chinesetools.eu/names/
o Hawaiian http://hawaiiannames.hisurf.com/
Just google “my name in (what ever language) then print
it and make it a special sign for them to keep.
_ Show them the world wide web.
“Oceans”
The Tropics
_ enjoy some Kona Coffee, Hawaii’s “Gold”
_ Use the web to learn elders’ names in Hawaiian and a few
Hawaiian phrases.
_ Learn the meaning of the different Hula Dances by the way they
use their hands
http://library.thinkquest.org/J0110077/dance.htm
_ Dinner Party. adventure into Hawaiian Dishes
_ Try your hand at Pineapple bowling with a Coconut bowling ball
_ Have a Parrot Head Day. Play Jimmy Buffett, have “Changes in
Attitude” discussion group, Cheeseburgers in Paradise for lunch
and Margaritaville for Happy Hour
_
_ Take photos and make your own Hawaiian Post Card
c
http://www.hawaiiandays.com/HDC/categories/cat_postcards.htm
has vintage postcards, and may grant permission (they did for me)
for you to copy and use their photos for backgrounds. Then cut and
paste resident photos on the computer (looks best) or by hand to
make the postcards
_ Have a luau with BBQ, have staff dress tropical.
_ Use fruit of the Islands, and make individual Pineapple
Shortcakes: twinkies, vanilla pudding, pineapple and whipped
cream
_ Don’t forget the Drinks of the Islands happy hour !!



Saturday, January 2, 2016

Press Release: National Activity Professionals Week


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


It is not too late. Remember to send the newspaper a press release about National Activity Professionals Week. This idea is courtesy of Re-Creative Resources


SAMPLE PRESS RELEASE The following is a sample press release related to recreation programs in long-term care. Note: Before writing a press release or any other public relations activity, refer to your facility administrator, marketing director, etc. to ensure you are following guidelines. CONTACT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact Person Date Company Name Telephone Number FAX Number Email Address Website URL RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES: A FUN-DAMENTAL COMPONENT IN LONG-TERM CARE "Activities are the heartbeat of the facility," a resident in a long-term care facility once said. The importance of activity in long-term care is just one reason why
At
The team of professionals at
disciplinary approach to quality of life. As an example, the Food and Nutrition Department hosts a monthly cooking class, in which residents share in the preparation of their favorite recipes. Similarly, the Rehabilitation Department works in conjunction with the Recreation Department to increase residents’ physical functioning. Even the Nursing Department can be found reading the newspaper or singing in the dayroom. In addition, there are numerous community groups and volunteers that enhance the quality of life of the residents.
The long-term care industry has changed dramatically over the years. Now, quality of life is as equally important as quality of care. Recreational activities have become a heightened focus of regulatory agencies such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and are a FUN-damental component of today’s long-term care facilities.
name of facility offers a variety of recreational activities that stimulate minds, promote physical fitness, increase social interaction, teach new skills and, overall, improve the quality of life for all residents. name of facility, residents are engaged in person-centered, meaningful activities, specially adapted to meet the needs and interests of each resident. For example, the wide range of therapeutic recreational activities at name of facility include pet therapy, music therapy, intergenerational programs, community outings, exercise and creative-expressive programs, cognitively challenging games, cultural programs, clubs and special events, programs for the cognitively impaired, etc. are just some of the activities offered. Programs are offered daily and provided in small, medium and large-sized groups, as well as on a one to one basis. name of facility believes in creating an environment that is fulfilling, holistic and nurturing for the residents. For that reason, name of facility has an inter-Name of facility is one of 10 skilled nursing facilities in the xyz Corporation that provides both short and long-term care and rehabilitation services. For more information on name of facility, please call (555) 123-456-7890 or visit us on the web at www.nameoffacility.com.