"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

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Saturday, May 21, 2011

Easyceus for healthcare workers

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities





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Tuesday, May 17, 2011

How to Create a Care Plan for a Dementia Patient

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities

Here is a dementia music activity

ehow

A care plan for a patient with dementia, no matter where he is living, ensures the highest quality of life for him despite this diagnosis. Since each person with dementia displays different behaviors, has specific interests and different strengths, the care plan is person centered. His dementia progresses over time. Because of this, it is more difficult to assess the dementia patient's needs and preferences as time goes on. Learn all you can while the dementia person is able to communicate. The outcome of the care plan makes the dementia patient's life as happy and satisfying as possible.


Difficulty: ModerateInstructions

Step 1Get an accurate history about the patient with dementia. This includes current medications, strengths, weaknesses, current and past interests, former jobs, and a thorough family history.

Step 2Observe the dementia patient. Make note of how she reacts to her environment, especially triggers for unwanted behavior.

Step 3Meet with all team leaders who are responsible for every aspect of the dementia patient's care. The teams include nursing, social work, therapy, activities, family members and the dementia patient, unless the meeting will upset him.

Step 4Together write a care plan that includes the best ways to care for this person. Include specific goals for each team and ways to accomplish these goals. Assign team members to each goal. Make sure to get everyone's input.

Step 5Share...read all of How to Create a Care Plan for a Dementia Patient

Sunday, May 15, 2011

Drug-Induced Dementia and Delirium Common in Seniors But Often Undetected, Public Citizen Says


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and categivers, here is something you should know

CommonDreams.org

Older patients become more susceptible to drug-induced dementia and delirium as they age, but the symptoms are often overlooked by doctors who don't realize that the condition may be caused by drugs and reversed, Public Citizen writes in a Worst Pills, Best Pills News article released today on WorstPills.org, the organization's drug safety Web site.

Unlike most forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease, which cannot be reversed, dementia caused by prescription drug use may be stopped by discontinuing the offending medication. The drug safety experts at Public Citizen have identified 136 commonly prescribed medications, especially certain antidepressants and pain medications, that can cause difficulty thinking.

Drug-induced dementia and delirium are commonly misattributed to underlying medical illness or merely to "old age." But by stopping or modifying the dosage of numerous, frequently prescribed drugs, most patients can be restored to a pre-drug state of mental clarity.

Older people are more susceptible to drug-induced delirium and dementia because the body's ability to rid itself of drugs decreases with age, often because of normal age-related decrease in kidney and liver function. Also, older patients are often prescribed multiple drugs at the same time, resulting in complicated interactions and enhanced side effects. Some research also suggests older patients' brains may be more sensitive to drugs' effects on the central nervous system.

"Sadly, doctors don't always recognize cognitive impairment as a side effect, so many patients needlessly suffer from this debilitating but reversible condition," said Sidney Wolfe, M.D., director of Public Citizen's Health Research Group and acting Public Citizen president. "After beginning new drugs, doctors, patients and their families should watch for subtle changes in cognition and assume changes may be caused by drug therapy. People already suffering from some cognitive impairment are most susceptible."

Delirium is a syndrome of changes in vision, hearing and thinking that usually starts abruptly and is commonly seen in the hospital setting or during an acute illness; symptoms typically improve when the cause is treated. Dementia, on the other hand, is a chronic alteration in thinking that progresses slowly. Alzheimer's disease is dementia's most common cause, but it also can be caused by strokes and other conditions.

Saturday, May 7, 2011

All About Eggs: An Activity for Those with Dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here are more interesting dementia brain boosting activities





Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

AC Content



When you hear the word egg, you might think of breakfast, an omelet, bacon or any number of things. This game is all about things eggs remind people with dementia of. Just about everyone has eaten or cooked with eggs or both. Thinking about eggs may remind you of certain holidays and special days as well. That is why the egg is a perfect topic.

You can really start anywhere. In June National Egg Day is celebrated. I like to start by asking group members about ways to cook eggs. Most people with dementia do not eat raw eggs. Participants might say that you can fry eggs. Now here you could ask about ways to fry eggs such as scrambled or you could go on with other ways to cook eggs like boiling them.

You could discuss what breakfast foods you make with eggs like French toast, waffles or pancakes. Pancakes and waffles could be another side discussion because there are many different foods you can mix with the batter to make different varieties of these breakfast treats. You might also put different types of toppings on as well.

Still on the topic of breakfast, you and your participants with dementia can talk about foods you eat with eggs such as ham, bacon sausage or toast. As another side discussion, you can talk about varieties of any of these things. For example, if you are talking about types of toast and what toppings you could put on toast.

When you have exhausted breakfast foods, move onto what ...read all of All About Eggs: An Activity for Those with Dementia