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Saturday, July 30, 2016

What's My Line-An Activity for Labor Day

What's My Line?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is a game for those with dementia and other long term care residents

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals, 



Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



The first Monday in September is Labor Day, a perfect time to talk about former jobs of residents. You can play a game called “What My Line?” 

First discuss former occupations of the audience members. Include answers to the following questions in your discussion of each job.
For lower functioning groups, discuss one or two occupations. Then have the audience guess the occupation of the mystery guest. 
What’s My Line?
Suggested questions
Do you work inside?
Do you provide a service?
Do you wear a uniform?
Do you sit while you work?
Do you travel when you work?
Do you use your hands while you work?
Do you use tools while you work?
Do you entertain people while you work?
Do you work with other people?
Do you take care of other people?

Review the answers with the audience for a more successful outcome.

You can play this game many different ways depending on the abilities of your audience.
If you have any questions, please leave them in the comment section.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

More Ways to Keep the Mind of People in Long Term Care Active in October



Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


There are a number of activities that can be done in the October with those who have dementia whether they live at home or at a long term care facility. Many of the activities can be done with other long term care residents as well. Remember any activity that makes people think will go along way in slowing the decline of dementia. In addition sparking conversation as these suggested ideas do, also help to keep a dementia person's mind active and slows down the disease process.

October is also pizza month. You could have a pizza party. You can make English muffin pizzas. If you do not want to do any cooking, you can talk about pizza toppings. See how many you and the group can name.

Another big event happening in October is the World Series. In fact October is World Series Month.

This is a good opportunity to talk about baseball one last time. Talk about favorite baseball teams, teams that might make it to the World Series, baseball trivia, etc. Of course do not forget to sing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame".


October: Reproducible Activities (From Your Friends At The Mailbox, Grade 1)

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

The Star Spangled Banner

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About.com


—Francis Scott Key, 1814
O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there.
O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


On the shore dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner: O, long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!


And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


O thus be it ever when free-men shall stand
Between their lov'd home and the war's desolation;
Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land
Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserv'd us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: “In God is our trust!”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!



On Sept. 13, 1814, Francis Scott Key visited the British fleet in Chesapeake Bay to secure the release of Dr. William Beanes, who had been captured after the burning of Washington, DC. The release was secured, but Key was detained on ship overnight during the shelling of Fort McHenry, one of the forts defending Baltimore. In the morning, he was so delighted to see the American flag still flying over the fort that he began a poem to commemorate the occasion. First published under the title “Defense of Fort M'Henry,” the poem soon attained wide popularity as sung to the tune “To Anacreon in Heaven.” The origin of this tune is obscure, but it may have been written by John Stafford Smith, a British composer born in 1750. “The Star-Spangled Banner” was officially made the national anthem by Congress in 1931, although it already had been adopted as such by the army and the navy.



Read more: The Star-Spangled Banner — Infoplease.com


Sunday, July 24, 2016

Using gratitude

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

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feelingsnet.com


Use this information about gratitide is important and will have a positive impact on the people you serve

Gratitude is appreciation of someone who has done something desirable, helped us, and done a good deed. Giving thanks to somebody gives them a good feeling of being appreciated.
There is no need to wait until somebody does something that we want for us in order to say thank you. This wonderful and enchanting phrase, "thank you", can be used every day, to express gratitude for the wonderful world that illuminates our morning with beautiful rays of sun, gratitude for our loving and supportive family, and so on. Our awareness of the wonderful things that happen in our life will only become greater and more powerful, and enable us to continue to receive more of what we already have.

Expressing gratitude calms the emotions. Expressing gratitude brings us into harmony and is good for the heart and soul. Expressing gratitude opens many doors to happiness, serenity and good health.
Sometimes we give thanks in our heart - very quietly.
The effective way to feel a sense of gratitude is to change our focus towards the positive things around us that are already taking place in our lives.
Expressing gratitude as a way of coping with bad moods
Sometimes we feel depressed and out of sorts. The circumstances can be many and varied, and sometimes there may be no real reason, just that we "got out of bed on the wrong side".
There are many beautiful catchphrases: "it is all in our own hands", or "don`t take any notice of what they say about you, know your own value". These things are good and true, but people who are in a black mood are not capable of hearing advice from others. When they feel that their situation is dark and gloomy, it is hard to persuade them by means of such slogans.

We all experience a wide range of emotions, we all fall sometimes into the pit of anger, hatred, competitiveness, jealousy and fear. One of the strongest tools for getting out of this maelstrom and letting go of these difficult emotions is to express gratitude.

Being thankful is a practical action, with the power to heal body and soul. It has a magical power that can bring us out of our state of "emotional emergency".
We have to find time during the day to give thanks for all the good things in our lives, from our functional limbs to the external environment in which we live. Expressing gratitude works like a magic broom: if said wholeheartedly, it will free us from the shackles of sadness and discontent. After we give thanks for everything that exists in our lives, we will certainly reach a place of emotional serenity and balance.
Even if somebody has, for example, insulted and hurt me, I have to make the effort to find something positive. It always exists. Sometimes awareness helps to improve things or to understand new directions.
Expressing gratitude and appreciation opens many doors.
When we thank others for their actions, they immediately feel like doing more for us. Expressing gratitude is one of our tools for enhancing and increasing good things in our lives.
In fact, it works like a formula:

the more we give thanks, the more we will receive of the things we are asking for.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Aesop's fable: The Lion and the Mouse


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dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

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The Lion and the Mouse


Once when a Lion was asleep a little Mouse began running up
and down upon him; this soon wakened the Lion, who placed his huge
paw upon him, and opened his big jaws to swallow him. "Pardon, O
King," cried the little Mouse: "forgive me this time, I shall
never forget it: who knows but what I may be able to do you a turn
some of these days?" The Lion was so tickled at the idea of the
Mouse being able to help him, that he lifted up his paw and let
him go. Some time after the Lion was caught in a trap, and the
hunters who desired to carry him alive to the King, tied him to a
tree while they went in search of a wagon to carry him on. Just
then the little Mouse happened to pass by, and seeing the sad
plight in which the Lion was, went up to him and soon gnawed away
the ropes that bound the King of the Beasts. "Was I not right?"
said the little Mouse.

Moral:
Little friends may prove great friends.

A Memory Pie - Creating a life experience for today which will create discussion for tomorrow.

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




Spark of Life

Jenn French

Kristina Larsson & Pamela Morales share how residents and staff at Meath House, Trigg, discovered cooking had never been so much fun as when it included every resident in their dementia ward.

It all started outside - on a beautiful day - where the residents were enjoying picking apples off our apple tree. In a team effort, the tallest picked the apples off the highest branches and passed them to those waiting below. Then we all geared up in gloves and hairnets for pie making, and, of course, everyone looked absolutely fabulous! The atmosphere was one of a big family coming together. Can there be anything better than the smell of homemade apple pie, wafting throughout the home and the sound of laughter coming from the kitchen? It was absolutely wonderful to see the residents' pride in making that lovely, fresh apple pie. Everyone talked about it for days and many of us agreed that it was the best apple pie we'd ever tasted.

Transforming apple pie into memories

Now the residents are making their own collage with bake-up day photos, getting creative and reminiscing at the same time.

Everyone participates in the craft sessions, even if just by looking at the photos, or being encouraged to share ideas and thoughts.

Making their own collage, and then seeing it displayed, will ensure that this is one activity that will continue to prompt discussion. Whether young or old, seeing ourselves in a photo brings out the same question: "Is that really me?"

Laughter is truly the best medicine and don't we all love to have fun? We definitely do here at Meath and making that apple pie certainly put a smile on everyone's face.

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Chicken Soup for the Soul and positive thinking and inspiration


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]






We all need to be inspired in order to accomplish something. Inspiration fuels our desire to reach for our dreams even though they may have changed. It enables us to become someone we want to be. There are different sources of inspiration and one of them is from the people we met. It's great to be inspired.

Inspire others with your words. Words are powerful tool to change a person's life. To inspire others, you need to translate your message of hope through spoken or written words.

Inspire others by your example. People pay attention to your actions without you even knowing about it. In order to inspire others, you need to be a good role model for them to follow. Inspiration comes when those around you see qualities in you that are worth emulating.

Inspire others by caring. Show the residents that you care for them by your kind words and deeds to them.

Inspire others by listening actively. Listen to what your participants are telling you. Then act on what they have told you.

Inspire others by your self-confidence. A self-confident person inspires people around him by exuding positive vibes. If you believe in yourself and in your own ability, people will notice and follow you. You will inspire them to be confident in how they are and in whatever they do.

Read inspiritational stories. Chicken Soup for the Soul stories are great

Monday, July 18, 2016

Positive Thinking: The Power of Positive Thoughts Enables to Be Free from Worries

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

The power of positive thoughts enables others to be free from their worries. When someone is going through difficult times there would be naturally worry and tension. At such times it becomes very natural for us too to come into tension. However, we don't seem to be able to help the other person in anyway when we have such thoughts. Instead we only add to the negative thoughts of that person. When we find someone who is having negative thoughts in a difficult situation, we need to remind ourselves that we are the only ones who can help them come back to his positivity. It is possible for us to do this only when our own thoughts are positive. When we train our mind in this way we will be able to maintain our own positivity which will enable the other person also to be rid of his worries.


~ Brahma Kumaris, Mt Abu

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Smile activities

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

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Have a smile off.

See who can smile the longest.

Sing songs about smiles.

Read or make up a poem about smiles.
Talk about other emotions and facial expressions. Remember, those with memory impairments can relate well to emotions.

Draw faces with smiles or other facial expressions.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Wreath of leaves- an easy to do fall craft for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

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Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Wreath of leaves- an easy to do fall craft for those with dementia

Supplies needed:

A plain white paper plate
Construction paper (orange, red, yellow, brown, and other earth tones)
Crayons or markers
Scissors
Glue or a glue stick

Cut a half circle out of the center of a plain paper plate. This will hold the leaves.

Cut out a lot of leaves from construction paper. Draw the leaf veins if you wish. If you'd like, use leaves gathered from outdoors.

Leaf templates and other fall ideas

Glue the leaves all around the rim of the paper plate.

For more, come back soon

Leaf Wreath- An Easy Dementia Activity(part 2)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

In the lower center of the wreath, write, "I am thankful for," and then let the client write or draw what he is thankful for.
Put the client's name on the wreath (or let him sign it).

For variations on this wreath: instead of using cut out leaves, use leaves from outdoor trees, silk leaves or torn-up scraps of paper.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Tree Names

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

American Arborvitae
American Beech
American Elm
American Yellowwood
Amur Maple
Ann Magnolia
Aristocrat Flowering Pear
Austrian Pine
Autumn Blaze Red Maple
Autumn Flame Red Maple
Autumn Olive
Autumn Purple Ash
Bald Cypress
Bitternut Hickory
Black Cherry
Black Gum
Black Hills Spruce
Black Locust
Black Oak
Black Walnut
Black Willow
Bloodgood London Planetree
Blue Spruce
Box elder
Bradford Flowering Pear
Bur Oak
Butterfly Bush
Canada Red Cherry
Cedar Elm
Chanticleer Flowering Pear
Cherokee Chief Red
Flowering Dogwood
Cherokee Princess White
Flowering Dogwood
Cherokee Sweetgum Tree
Cherry Bark Oak
Chestnut Oak
Chickasaw Plum
Chinese Chestnut
Chinese Elm
Chinese Pistache
Chinkapin Oak
Cimarron Ash
Cleveland Select Flowering Pear
Colorado Blue Spruce
Columnar English Oak
Common Purple Lilac
Contorted Willow
Dawn Redwood
Dura-Heat River Birch
Dwarf Red Buckeye
Eastern Red Cedar
Eastern Red Oak
Eastern Redbud
Eastern White Pine
European Horse Chestnut
Forest Pansy
Fragrant Honeysuckle
Fraser Fir
Fringe Tree
Gobbler Sawtooth Oak
Golden Chain Tree
Golden Raintree
Green Ash
Hackberry
Hardy Pecan
Heritage River Birch
Hybrid Willow
Ironwood Tree
Ivory Silk Lilac Tree
Jane Magnolia
Kentucky Coffee Tree
Kousa Dogwood
Kwanzan Flowering Cherry
Lacebark Elm
Loblolly Pine
Lombardy Poplar
Maidenhair
Mayhaw
Mimosa Tree
Mockernut Hickery Native Plum
Northern Catalpa
Northern Red Oak
Norway Spruce
Nuttail Oak
October Glory Red Maple
Ohio Buckeye
Okame Flowering Cherry
Oklahoma Redbud
Osage Orange
Overcup Oak
Patmore Ash
Paw Paw
Persimmon
Pignut Hickory
Pin Oak
Pink Flowering Dogwood
Pond Cypress
Ponderosa Pine
Poplar Hybrid
Post Oak
Prairiefire Crabapple
Red Bud
Red Cedar
Red Maple
Red Sunset Red Maple
Redspire Flowering Pear
River Birch
Russian Olive
Sargent Crabapple
Sassafras Tree
Sawtooth Oak
Scarlet Oak
Scotch Pine
Serviceberry
Shademaster Honey Locust
Shagbark Hickory
Shellbark Hickory
Shumard Oak
Siberian Elm
Silver Maple
Silverbells
Siouxland Cottonless Cottonwood
Snow Goose Flowering Cherry
Sourgum
Sourwood
Southern Crabapple
Southern Red Oak
Sugar Maple
Sugarberry
Sunburst Golden Honey Locust
Swamp Chestnut
Swamp Oak
Sweet Gum
Sweetbay or Swamp Magnolia
Sycamore
Texana Nuttail Oak
Texas Whitebud
Thornless Honeylocust
Tulip Poplar
Tulip Tree
Tupelo
Virginia Pine
Washington Hawthorne
Water Oak
Weeping Higan Cherry
Weeping Willow
White Ash
White Flowering Dogwood
White Oak
White Pine
White Walnut
Whitebud
Willow Oak
Yellow Buckeye
Yoshino Cherry
Zumi Crabtree

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Prayers lift spirits

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals.Benevolant Society

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Beyond Blue


The Serenity Prayer by Reinhold Niebuhr
God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.
Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
Taking, as He did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right if I surrender to His Will;
That I may be reasonably happy in this life
and supremely happy with Him Forever in the next.
Amen.

Prayer by Thomas Merton
My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going.
I do not see the road ahead of me.
I cannot know for certain where it will end.
Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so.
But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you.
And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing.
I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire.
And I know that if I do this
you will lead me by the right road
though I may know nothing about it.
Therefore will I trust you always
though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death.
I will not fear, for you are ever with me,
and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.


The Third Step Prayer
God, I offer myself to Thee …
to build with me and to do with me as Thou wilt.
Relieve me of the bondage of self,
that I may better do Thy will.
Take away my difficulties,
that victory over them may bear witness to those I would help
of Thy Power, Thy Love, and Thy Way of life.
May I do Thy will always!

The Memorare
Remember O Most gracious Virgin Mary,
that never was it known that anyone who fled to your protection,
implored your help,
or sought your intercession
was left unaided.
Inspired by this confidence,
I fly to you, O Virgin of virgins, my mother.
To you I come;
before you I stand, sinful and sorrowful.
O Mother of the Word Incarnate,
despise not my petitions,
but in your mercy, hear and answer me.
Amen.

Prayer by John Henry Newman
Dear Jesus,
Help me to spread Your fragrance everywhere I go.
Flood my soul with Your spirit and life.
Penetrate and possess my whole being so utterly,
that my life may only be a radiance of Yours.
Shine through me, and be so in me
that every soul I come in contact with may feel Your presence in my soul.
Let them look up and see no longer me,
but only Jesus!
Stay with me and then I shall begin to shine as you shine,
so to shine as to be a light to others;
the light, O Jesus will be all from You;
none of it will be mine;
it will be you, shining on others through me.
Let me thus praise You the way You love best,
by shining on those around me.
Let me preach You without preaching,
not by words but by my example,
by the catching force of the sympathetic influence of what I do,
the evident fullness of the love my heart bears to You.
Amen.
St. Teresa of Avila’s “Bookmark”
Let nothing disturb you.
Let nothing frighten you.
All things are passing.
God alone is changeless
He who has patience wants for nothing
He who has God has all things.
God alone suffices.

Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi
Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury,pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
and where there is sadness, joy.
O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek?to be consoled as to console;?to be understood as to understand;?to be loved as to love.?For it is in giving that we receive;?it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;?and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen
image courtesy of wikipedia

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

More about craft projects for those with dementia



Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, we have been discussing a patriotic craft for the Fourth of July. Here is more information.

The above craft can be done for any patriotic activity simply by changing the words or not having any words at all.

Make sure when you do a project that each step is simple

Do a project over a number of days so people do not lose interest during the activity.

If you are doing it in one day, then take breaks and do trivia or singing in between steps

Have a volunteer complete most of the project and have group members complete the project

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professionals, 





Monday, July 4, 2016

Easy patriotic art for those with dementia

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, there are so many crafts for the Fourth of July or for any other patriotic holidays.

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


One in particular that I like is a wall hanging

You will need:
1/2 half sheet of blue construction paper
red and white crepe paper streamers
glue or tape

Give each participant or team 1/2 sheet of blue construction paper
Also give them about 8 inches of red and 6 inches of white crepe paper.
Have them cut or rip them into a[[roximately 2 inch pieces so they have 7 pieces of about the same size
Have them glue or tape the crepe paper to the blue construction paper on the horizontal edge, alternating colors with 4 red strips and 3 white strips
The side they glue the strips to, is the back
Let the glue dry
This is a good time to sing some patriotic songs or play patriotic trivia

When they are almost dry or dry,decorate the front with star sticker, white stickers, or you can have them glue a smaller sign on the front that says
Happy 4th of July

They can put a ribbon across the top so they can display their hanging

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Declaration of Independence

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

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Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Kids celebrate America

Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies


In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.
Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain [George III] is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.
He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.
He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained, and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.
He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.
He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.
He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.
He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.
He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers.
He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.
He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance.
He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies, without the consent of our legislatures.
He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power.
He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:
  • For protecting them by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:
  • For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:
  • For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:
  • For depriving us in many cases of the benefits of Trial by Jury:
  • For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences:
  • For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies:
  • For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:
  • For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.
He has abdicated Government here by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.
He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.
He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.
He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.
In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms. Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.
Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren.
  • We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us.
  • We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here.
  • We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence.
They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.
We, therefore, the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by the authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare.
That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown,
and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain is and ought to be totally dissolved;
and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce,
and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.

The signers of the Declaration represented the new States as follows:

New Hampshire:

Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton

Massachusetts:

John Hancock, Samual Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry

Rhode Island:

Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery

Connecticut:

Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott

New York:

William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris

New Jersey:

Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark

Pennsylvania:

Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross

Delaware:

Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean

Maryland:

Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton

Virginia:

George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton

North Carolina:

William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn

South Carolina:

Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton

Georgia:

Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton