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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Ash Wednesday for Those with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Journey to Jerusalem: Scriptures, Meditations, and Prayers From Ash Wednesday Through Easter

Journey to Jerusalem: Scriptures, Meditations, and Prayers From Ash Wednesday Through Easter

For Ash Wednesday, I thought I would share a special Ash Wednesday spiritual circle which is sure to bring peace, comfort and joy to those with Alzheimer’s disease, related dementias, and to other long term care residents.
Begin with an opening hymm. I like:
Blow Ye Trumpets Blow
Other hymns I suggest are:
Ashes to Ashes and
Lay Aside Your Passing Pleasure
Secular songs I suggest are:
Battle Hymn of the Republic
Always
I Love You Truly
I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles
You are My Sunshine
Talk about this reflection
God will deliver His promises as we are able to receive them.
What He is doing is right for us. We should listen to His messenger.
Instead of a story, read this poem
Marked by Ashes Ruler of the Night, Guarantor of the day . . .
This day — a gift from you.
This day — like none other you have ever given, or we have ever received.
This Wednesday dazzles us with gift and newness and possibility.
This Wednesday burdens us with the tasks of the day, for we are already halfway home
     halfway back to committees and memos,
     halfway back to calls and appointments,
     halfway on to next Sunday,
     halfway back, half frazzled, half expectant,
     half turned toward you, half rather not. This Wednesday is a long way from Ash Wednesday,
   but all our Wednesdays are marked by ashes —
     we begin this day with that taste of ash in our mouth:
       of failed hope and broken promises,
       of forgotten children and frightened women,
     we ourselves are ashes to ashes, dust to dust;
     we can taste our mortality as we roll the ash around on our tongues.We are able to ponder our ashness with
   some confidence, only because our every Wednesday of ashes
   anticipates your Easter victory over that dry, flaky taste of death. On this Wednesday, we submit our ashen way to you —
   you Easter parade of newness.
   Before the sun sets, take our Wednesday and Easter us,
     Easter us to joy and energy and courage and freedom;
     Easter us that we may be fearless for your truth.
   Come here and Easter our Wednesday with
     mercy and justice and peace and generosity.We pray as we wait for the Risen One who comes soon.
For over thirty years now, Walter Brueggemann (b. 1933) has combined the best of critical scholarship with love for the local church in service to the kingdom of God. Now a professor emeritus of Old Testament studies at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia, Brueggemann has authored over seventy books. Taken from his Prayers for a Privileged People (Nashville: Abingdon, 2008), pp. 27-28
Questions for Discussion:
Q: What is Ash Wednesday?
A:Ash Wednesday is the day Lent begins. It occurs forty days before Good Friday..
Q: Why is it called Ash Wednesday?
A:Actually, Ash Wednesday is its colloquial name. Its official name is the Day of Ashes. It is called Ash Wednesdaybecause, being forty days before Good Friday, it always falls on a Wednesday and it is called AshWednesday because on that day at church the faithful have their foreheads marked with ashes in the shape of a cross
Q: Why do they have their foreheads marked with a cross?
A: Because in the Bible a mark on the forehead is a symbol of a person’s ownership. By having their foreheads marked with the sign of a cross, this symbolizes that the person belongs to Jesus Christ, who died on a Cross..
Q: Where do the ashes used on Ash Wednesday come from?
A: They are made by burning palm fronds which have been saved from the previous year’s Palm Sunday, they are then blessed by a priest
More Prayers
Father in Heaven,
Let Us Pray
[for the grace to keep Lent faithfully]
Lord
Protect us in our struggle against evil.
As we begin the discipline of Lent,
make this season holy by our self-denial.
Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit
one God, for ever and ever.
International Committee on English in the Liturgy (ICEL)
Penitential Prayer of St. Ambrose of Milan
O Lord, who hast mercy upon all,
take away from me my sins,
and mercifully kindle in me
the fire of thy Holy Spirit.
Take away from me the heart of stone,
and give me a heart of flesh,
a heart to love and adore Thee,
a heart to delight in Thee,
to follow and enjoy Thee, for Christ’s sake, Amen
St. Ambrose of Milan (AD 339-397)
Prayer of St. Ephraim the Syrian 
O Lord and Master of my life,
give me not the spirit of laziness,
despair, lust of power, and idle talk. (prostration)
But give rather the spirit of sobriety,
humility, patience and love to Thy servant. (prostration)
Yea, O Lord and King,
grant me to see my own transgressions
and not to judge my brother,
for blessed art Thou unto ages of ages. Amen (prostration)
St. Ephraim the Syrian (AD 305-373)
End with the song
This is the Day

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Black History Month


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,
Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Black History Month can be tricky for those with dementia because some folks with dementia are predjudiced and can say some not so nice things about African Americans.

The other factor is that there can be a number of African American CNAs taking care of people with dementia in a long term care facility.

Celebrating or at least recognizing Black History Month may be a way to break down some of these barriers.

However, understand that if an African American caregiver upsets or causes agitation in a person with dementia, get a different caregiver. Realize however before jumping to any conclusions that it may not be the color of the caregivers skin that is upsetting the person with dementia, but rather it may be the caregiver.

Friday, January 27, 2017

How to make a football pool

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be




A football pool is a fun way to get everyone involved in the super bowl game.  Be sure to include that you’ll be doing a pool in your football party invitations.  The most common type of betting pool one displayed on a 10 x 10 grid with numbers along both the top and left side of the page.  You can sell the squares for any amount you wish.  $1.00 per square is a typical amount.  This puts $100 in the pool.
The object of this pool is to have the combination of number that match the last numbers in the score of the game. Payouts are based on the score of each team at the end of each quarter. Please note that the digit used is always the second number. For example, if a team has 17 points at the end of the quarter, the 7 is used to determine the winner. You can make the payouts equal for each quarter, but it is also common to have a larger payout for the end of the game.

Things You’ll Need:

  • Television- to watch the game of course!
  • Colored Pens
  • Construction Paper
  • Permanent Markers
  • Poster Boards
  • Colored pens
  • Permanent markers

Making the Grid:

Step 1: Get pens and a large piece of blank paper.
Step 2: Draw a 10-by-10 grid.
Step 3: Write the numbers 0 through 9 across the top, above each square.
Step 4: Write the numbers 0 through 9 along the left side of the grid, next to each square.
Step 5: Write one Super Bowl team’s name at the top and the other on the left side.
Step 6: Sell each square for one unit, which will provide a 100-unit payoff. Players may want to acquire more than one square; it’s best to use all squares.
Step 7: Write the initials of the buyer in the corresponding square.
Final Step: As you Watch the game and enjoy the commercials,  match the last digit of each team’s final score with the grid to decide the winner. For example, a score of Team A 13, Team B 26, would mean finding the square where 3 on the vertical scale meets 6 on the horizontal. If Mike chose the space where these two numbers meet, he’s the winner.  Remember you can also do this at the end of each quarter or at half time and the final score.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

A Ground Hog's Day Activity

Activities Directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

For Ground Hogs Day
Play with shadows using your hands and a bright light. A portable lamp or a flashlight will do.

Shine the light on your hands or resident's hands so that the shadow of their hands falls on a smooth surface like a wall or table. Invite all to move their hand closer to the light and farther away from the light. Notice what happens to the shadow.

Have them turn their hands in different ways to see how the shape of the shadow changes



This can be a fun activity for those with dementia.

Super Bowl Facts for Activities




Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

NFL.com

The Super Bowl is the championship game of the National Football League (NFL), the highest level of professional American football in the United States, culminating a season that begins in the autumn of the previous calendar year. The Super Bowl uses Roman numerals to identify each game, rather than the year in which it is held. For example, Super Bowl I was played on January 15, 1967, following the regular season played in 1966, while Super Bowl XLVI will be played on February 5, 2011, to determine the champion of the 2011 regular season.
The game was created as part of a merger agreement between the NFL and its then-rival league, the American Football League (AFL). It was agreed that the two leagues' champion teams would play in an AFL–NFL World Championship Game until the merger was to officially begin in 1970. After the merger, each league was redesignated as a "conference", and the game was then played between the conference champions.
The day on which the Super Bowl is played is now considered a de facto American national holiday,[1][2][3] called "Super Bowl Sunday". It is the second-largest day for U.S. food consumption, after Thanksgiving Day.[4] In most years, the Super Bowl is the most-watched American television broadcast; Super Bowl XLVII played in February 2013 between the Baltimore Ravens and the San Francisco 49ers may become the most-watched American television program in history, drawing an average audience of 106.5 million viewers and taking over the spot held for twenty-seven years by the final episode of M*A*S*H.[5] The Super Bowl final is among the most watched sporting events in the world, primarily due to mostly North American audiences, and is second to the UEFA Champions League final as the most watched annual sporting event worldwide.
Because of its high viewership, commercial airtime during the Super Bowl broadcast is the most expensive of the year. Due to the high cost of investing in advertising on the Super Bowl, companies regularly develop their most expensive advertisements for this broadcast. As a result, watching and discussing the broadcast's commercials has become a significant aspect of the event.[6] In addition, many popular singers and musicians have performed during the event's pre-game and halftime ceremonies because of the exposureThoughts from a fan
The Super Bowl is the single greatest sporting event that any fan can aspire to watch.
The Super Bowl is more than a game, it’s more than a World Championship, it’s a full on NFL
experience.
The game itself is indescribable.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Ground hog's day story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


A ground hog is a small animal that digs and lives under the ground. It is also called the woodchuck. Ground hogs live in many parts of America. In the winter they hibernate like bears and some other animals.

There is a legend that says a few hundred years ago Europeans brought Ground Hog Day to America. They said that the ground hog wakes up from his hibernation on February 2. (February 2 is half way between winter and spring.) If he comes up from his hole and it is sunny, he will see his shadow and be frightened. If he sees his shadow, there will be 6 more weeks of winter weather. But if he comes up and the sky is cloudy, he will not see his shadow and will not be frightened. Then spring weather will come very soon.

Some people believe this legend and they watch the sky on February 2. Many people are happy if it is cloudy on that day. They think spring will come soon. But most people think it is just a fun legend. What do you think?

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Bonus: From Adorable Photographs of Our Baby- A Colorful Activity

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Look at the baby photo to the right

Here is an exerpt from the book Adorable Photographs of Our Baby- a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Our baby likes to look at bright, colorful toys when he wakes up.
Where is the baby?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is in his crib. Do you see him there?

What time do you think this baby wakes up in the morning?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he wakes up at 6am. What do you think?
Have a discussion about the best time to get up. Also, talk about why babies get up so early.
Then ask: What time do you wake up in the morning?

What is the baby doing?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is looking at his toys. What do you think?

Let’s name some toys.
If prompting is needed, say something like:
Is a truck a toy? There are many toys that could be named.
You can have a discussion about which toys are for boys, girls, or both.
You could have some pictures of toys or even have toys for group members to see and touch.

What color toys do you see?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I see a red toy. Do you? What other color toys do you see?

Color ideas--Let’s name some colors.
Let’s name some things that are usually blue (or any color). Continue as long as the interest lasts. Remember: give help as needed which may include giving a choice of two.
What is your favorite color?
What colors do you think [another participant who is shy or non-verbal] likes? I think[another participant]likes red because (s)he is wearing a red shirt today.

What happens if we mix two colors, like yellow and blue(or any combination of colors)? Mix colors as long as there is interest and time.
Let’s find out! [Leader should have paints and paper on hand and provide a demonstration or directions for the activity.]

Do you think this baby is having fun?
How can you tell? If prompting is needed, say something like:
I can tell because he is smiling. What do you think?
What does his smile tell you? If prompting is needed, say something like:
It tells me he is happy. What do you think?
What are some things that make you smile?

Other smile ideas-Have a smile off. See who can smile the longest. Sing songs about smiles. Read or make up a poem about smiles. Talk about other emotions and facial expressions. Remember, those with memory impairments can relate well to emotions. Draw faces with smiles or other facial expressions.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Dementia: Spring Story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be



Spring Chicken Soup for the Soul Story
When I was little, I often helped my mother plant our family's garden. As soon as the chilly winds of Chicago winter gave way to spring, Mom would be outside with a spade, seed packets, gardening gloves, and a secret smile that had been hibernating all winter. That smile never seemed to shine as bright as on those first few days in April when she squatted in the mud with tiny seeds in her hands.
I would pull on my grubbiest jeans, choose my shovel with care, and bound across the yard before Mom could say, "You forgot a jacket!" I would kneel by her side for hours, carefully digging holes and cautiously pushing seeds into the earth with my chubby fingers. We would spend hour after hour repeating the process, until the formerly snow-smothered area barely knew what hit it!
Unfortunately, I grew up. Somehow, I found better ways to spend the first days of spring, and I threw my annual April morning job into the growing pile of childish, outgrown activities. After all, I was too old to kneel in the dirt all day planting some silly seeds. I came to the conclusion that the shopping mall needed my assistance more than Mom did.
Surprisingly, my mother never said much about my decision until two years ago, the spring I turned 14. I was on my way to a friend's house, when Mom stopped me.
"Would you please help me with the planting today?" she asked.
"Oh, Mom, I was just getting ready to leave," I pouted. "I'll probably be gone most of the day." "Well, could you possibly come home a little early and join me in the fresh air?" Mom asked.
I mumbled something along the lines of, "Uh, maybe . . . I'll see."
By the time I left the house, Mom was already in the garden. She looked up for a moment as I walked past, and from the corner of my eye I saw a certain pain and sadness in her gaze. At first my heart told me I should stay to help, but as I got farther from home and closer to an exciting day of hanging out with friends, I forgot my impulse.
A few hours later, as the sun started to fall from its place in the warm, spring sky, I decided to leave my friends a bit early and head back home.
"Mom usually finishes planting around six," I thought. "If I get back soon, I'll still have an hour or so to help her." I felt very noble for my selfless decision. But when I reached home, there were Mom's dirty boots by the door and a small pile of empty seed packets on top of the garbage can. I was too late.
I didn't think much about that day until nearly a year later.
One of my father's good friends suddenly lost his wife to cancer. The doctors hadn't discovered Sara's illness until it was too late. She died shortly after the diagnosis, leaving behind her husband and two small, confused children.
Right away, Mom went south to visit the family and see how the children, David and Rachel, were coping with the sudden loss of their mother. She spent a few hours with little Rachel. When she came home, she told me this story.
When Sara had received her terminal diagnosis, she asked her husband, "What should I leave our children? How do I give them something to remember me by, a symbol of my love for as long as they live?"
Mom learned the answer from Rachel.
"Mommy made me my own garden," Rachel cooed, as she tugged on Mom's hand and led her outdoors. Sara had decided to plant her children something that would live on long after she was gone.
Although the children had helped with the original planting, it was obvious that most of the work had been patiently completed by their mother. The result was a masterpiece, with so much more among the leaves and petals than simple foliage. A piece of Sara's heart and soul was left in full bloom for her children.
As I listened to my mother tearfully tell Sara's story, I realized the true power of a garden. How had I missed it? Our annual planting was not about kneeling in dirt, throwing in some seeds, and hoping for the best. It was about kneeling there together, planting potential life, and creating the best memories possible out of those moments together. I was so lucky to have a healthy, vibrant, caring mother who was always there for me. As I suddenly realized how badly I missed seeing her soft hands place seeds in mine, many things became clear. I began to understand that the pain I had seen in her eyes that day a year ago had come from missing the little girl who was once at her side.
A few weeks later, I came home to find several bags of seeds on the kitchen table. I knew spring planting was near. The following Sunday, I woke to rays of sunlight streaming through my window. I looked outside to see a figure stooping in the dirt. I threw on the first clothes I could find and ran outside.
The first rays that encircled me were the ones streaming from my mother's smile. The first water our seeds encountered were the teardrops sliding happily from my eyes. We worked together all day and didn't stop until nightfall.
I won't ever miss planting day again.

History & Meaning of the Mandala

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some Mandala art information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Many people and cultures have vouched for the mandala’s intrinsic meaning. Buddhists, Tibetans, and Hindus have all derived meaning from the mandala and its captivating beauty. Psychoanalyst Carl Jung has called it “a representation of the unconscious self.” The mandala is widely recognized as a meaningful reflection of its creator. Mandala art therapy & healing can be a great source of reflection on one’s soul.

Mandalas can be seen all around us, but are not just people-centric. They are larger than life. Mandalas represent life as we know it, but they also represent a larger ecosystem and universe that exceeds our consciousness.
The “circle with a center” pattern is the basic structure of creation that is reflected from the micro to the macro in the world as we know it. It is a pattern found in nature and is seen in biology, geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy.
On our planet, living things On our planet, living things are made of cells and each cell has a nucleus — all display circles with centers. The crystals that form ice, rocks, and mountains are made of atoms. Each atom is a mandala.

Within the Milky Way galaxy is our solar system and within our solar system, is Earth. Each is a mandala that is part of a larger mandala.
Flowers, the rings found in tree trunks and the spiraling outward and inward of a snail’s shell all reflect the primal mandala pattern. Wherever a center is found radiating outward and inward, there is wholeness–a mandala.
Source: http://www.mandalaproject.org/Index.html
This couldn’t have been explained more beautifully.

Mandalas are everywhere. They are the structures of our cells, our world, and our universe.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Mandala Art

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some Mandala art

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be















Monday, January 16, 2017

People with dementia may turn to art

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Scientists are doing research on people with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders to help unravel how the brain works and why these people are interested in creating art. In increasing numbers, people with Alzheimer's disease are picking up paintbrushes or putting drawing pencils to paper. Some turn to art only after Alzheimer's disease has set in, and they may even be inspired by it. Both groups are helping researchers unravel the complicated and intertwined ways that biology produces creativity, including the contributions of inhibition, obsession and other personality traits. "There are virtually no situations where brain damage makes things better," says Anjan Chatterjee, a neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia , who is working on a book about art and the brain. But art is, he adds, one of the few complex aspects of human cognition that doesn't necessarily get worse.
"Think of a mobile where you have different weights that settle into some kind of equilibrium," he says. "If you take away certain weights, the whole system readjusts. In some instances, the art ends up being just as beautiful.
"In other cases, it's more beautiful."

Lester Potts had never picked up a paintbrush before his Alzheimer's diagnosis in 2001, at the age of 72. He had worked in a rural Alabama sawmill through the Great Depression. He served in the Korean War and grew into an even-keeled and dependable civic leader. But when his brain disorder struck, Potts lost the ability to take care of himself, and he sank into depression.
Painting with watercolors as part of a therapy program buoyed him, says his son, Daniel C. Potts. Even more surprising, his father had talent. When Lester brought home his first creation '" a bright purple and yellow hummingbird with green wings and a red head '" his wife asked him who gave him such a beautiful painting

As Lester's disease progressed, his paintings evolved too. And even though he lost the ability to talk or write before his death in 2007, his artwork continued to feature themes from his youth, offering comfort to his family and a fascinating look into the brain of someone with a degenerative and still-mysterious disease.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

More Sensory Ideas for those with Dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


Here are some more ideas for residents who have dementia, especially those who are lower functioning


Sorted by type


Vision
Pretty Wrapping Paper & Florescent Papers
Animals such as Birds, Bird Feeders, Fish Tanks
Bubble Tubes
Colored Lights, Strings of Lights, Christmas Lights
Light Box
Rattles, Tambourines
Mirrors
Flashing lights & Strobe Lights
Wind Up Animals
Mobiles that are age appropriate
Wind Socks & Wind Chimes
Activity Boxes, Easy to Watch Videos
Relaxation Videos


Taste
Peanut Butter, Licorice
Jelly, Spices, Honey
Chocolate, Peppermint
Nutella (located with Peanut Butter)
Tea, Coffee, Milk Shakes, Sodas
Strong Smelling Soups
Yogurt, Ice cream, Ice Chips Flavored
Lifesavers, Pickles, Horseradish


Smell
Lavender and other oils. Use an Electric Aroma Fan
Pot Pouri, Sachets
Perfumes, Powders, Lotions
Sun Tan Lotions (Coconut)
Candles, Incense, Aromatherapy
Bath Oils, Bubble Baths, Bath Soaps
Spices
Powders, Talcum Powders, Pillows with Powders inside
Flowers, Shrubs with Scents, Flowering Trees
Bakery, Candle Shop, Candy Shop
Pet Shop, Fruit Stand
Licorice


Hearing / Sound
Water Sounds, Fountains, Bubbling Brooks, Sound of Waves
Faucet turned on, Waterfall
Washing Machine, Dishwasher
Music, Bag Pipers, Concerts
Wind Chimes
Ticking Clocks, Metronomes, Coco Clocks
Music Boxes, Whistles
Instruments- Maracas, Pianos, Tambourines, Rattles, Chimes, Electric Key Boards, Pianos, Drums


Touch
Fake Fur, Soft Ear Muffs
Pets, Horses, Cows
Outside-Leaves, Tree Bark, Roses
Snow, Sand, Shells, Sea Weed
Hard Items-Rocks, Tree Bark, Fences
Soft Items-Clay, Dirt, Play Dough
Cotton, Sheepskin, Feathers,
Pastas, Cereals, Spaghetti
Large Beads, Jewelry, Gaskets
Pat Mats, Activity Aprons & Activity Pillows
Body Pillows, Textured Fabrics
Massage, Silk Materials
Vibrators, Dryer vibration, blow dryers, washing machines

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Dementia activities for spring

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Here are some easy fun, yet mind stimulating activities anyone can do with someone who has dementia.

Connect to nature

In late spring flowers are in bloom. This is the perfect time to arrange flowers and discuss the favorite flowers of all. You can talk about flower colors scents, where flowers grow as well as any other characteristics about flowers that seem appropriate. This discussion and activity will stimulate their mind and give a dementia person a feeling of self worth

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Colorful ideas for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter



Color Activity Ideas related to the picture of the baby looking at toys on the right side of this blog

What color toys do you see?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
   I see a red toy. Do you? What other color toys do you see?

Color ideas--Let’s name some colors.
   Let’s name some things that are usually blue (or any color). Continue as long as the          interest lasts. Remember: give help as needed which may include giving a choice of two.
   What is your favorite color?
   What colors do you think [another participant who is shy or non-verbal] likes? I think[another participant]likes red because (s)he is wearing a red shirt today.        

What happens if we mix two colors, like yellow and blue(or any combination of colors)?  Mix colors as long as there is interest and time.
   Let’s find out! [Leader should have paints and paper on hand and provide a demonstration or directions for the activity.]  

Get more ideas related to this picture as well as other ideas related to other pictures, see Adorable Photographs of Our Baby

Friday, January 6, 2017

Easy Spring riddles trivia and facts

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Q.  What season is it when you are on a trampoline?
A.  Spring-time!
Q.  When do monkeys fall from the sky?
A.  During Ape-ril showers!
Q.  Can February March?
A.  No, but April May!
Q.  What flowers grow on faces?
A.  Tulips (Two-lips)!
Q.  Why is the letter A like a flower?
A.  A bee (B) comes after it!

Question 1:


What does the name 'Irish Spring' refer to?
A soap brand
An euphemism for bad breath
A holiday
An uprising in Ireland

Question 2:

View the provided image.
What is the nickname of musician Bruce Springsteen?
The Soldier
The Boss
Chairman of the Board
The Devil


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Question 3:

View the provided image.
In which U.S. state is the city of Palm Springs located?
California
All of these
Texas
Hawaii


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Question 4:


What kind of animal is the Springbok?
Frog
Antelope
Wild cat
Insect

Question 5:


'La primavera', or 'Spring', is Concerto No. 1, in E major which is part of 'The Four Seasons' violin concertos. Who composed "The Four Seasons"?
Giacomo Puccini
Antonio Vivaldi
Antonio Salieri
Gioachino Rossini

Question 6:

View the provided image.
In what country did the European Revolution of 1848, also known as the Spring of Nations, begin?
Italy
England
Russia
France


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Question 7:

View the provided image.
'Primavera', or 'Spring', is a famous painting by which celebrated artist?
Michelangelo
Leonardo da Vinci
Sandro Botticelli
Titian


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Question 8:

View the provided image.
What is the birth name of TV host and former politician Jerry Springer?
Jeremiah
Gerald
Joseph
George


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Question 9:

View the provided image.
What is the name or the Roman goddess of spring?
Venus
Flora
Primavera
Aphrodite


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Question 10:

View the provided image.
What breed is the dog in the picture?
American Springer Spaniel
French Springer Spaniel
.German Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel

Spring Facts

Spring is one of the four seasons.



  • The four seasons are Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer.
  • Spring comes after Winter and before Summer.
  • Spring is a symbol of rebirth.
  • When it is Spring in the Northern Hemisphere it is Autumn or Fall in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • The Northern Hemisphere is North of the Equator.  The US is in the Northern Hemisphere.
  • The Southern Hemisphere is South of the Equator.  Australia is located in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • Spring begins on March 21st or 22nd.
  • The first day of Spring is called the Vernal Equinox.
  • Vernal is Latin for Spring.
  • Equinox is Latin for Equal Days.
  • On the first day of Spring the sunrise and sunset are about 12 hours apart, everywhere on the Earth and the hours of daylight and night are almost equal. Daylight is a little longer.
  • The Vernal Equinox occurs when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is not facing towards or away from the sun.
  • On the Vernal Equinox the sun is directly above the equator. This also happens on the Autumnal Equinox in Fall around September 22nd.
  • What Happens During Spring?

    • During Spring the Earth’s axis start to tilt towards the sun.
    • The days get longer and warmer.
    • Many animals have babies such as cows, birds, ducks
    • Animals such as bears who hibernate start to wake up and become active.
    • During April you will see more rain showers.
    • During May the flowers will start to bloom.
    • That is where the saying April showers bring May flowers comes from.
    • Easter, Passover, April Fools Day, Earth Day, Arbor Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Cino De Mayo, Holi (festival of colors in India) are all holidays in Spring
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