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Sunday, January 22, 2017

Bonus: From Adorable Photographs of Our Baby- A Colorful Activity

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Look at the baby photo to the right

Here is an exerpt from the book Adorable Photographs of Our Baby- a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Our baby likes to look at bright, colorful toys when he wakes up.
Where is the baby?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is in his crib. Do you see him there?

What time do you think this baby wakes up in the morning?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he wakes up at 6am. What do you think?
Have a discussion about the best time to get up. Also, talk about why babies get up so early.
Then ask: What time do you wake up in the morning?

What is the baby doing?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I think he is looking at his toys. What do you think?

Let’s name some toys.
If prompting is needed, say something like:
Is a truck a toy? There are many toys that could be named.
You can have a discussion about which toys are for boys, girls, or both.
You could have some pictures of toys or even have toys for group members to see and touch.

What color toys do you see?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
I see a red toy. Do you? What other color toys do you see?

Color ideas--Let’s name some colors.
Let’s name some things that are usually blue (or any color). Continue as long as the interest lasts. Remember: give help as needed which may include giving a choice of two.
What is your favorite color?
What colors do you think [another participant who is shy or non-verbal] likes? I think[another participant]likes red because (s)he is wearing a red shirt today.

What happens if we mix two colors, like yellow and blue(or any combination of colors)? Mix colors as long as there is interest and time.
Let’s find out! [Leader should have paints and paper on hand and provide a demonstration or directions for the activity.]

Do you think this baby is having fun?
How can you tell? If prompting is needed, say something like:
I can tell because he is smiling. What do you think?
What does his smile tell you? If prompting is needed, say something like:
It tells me he is happy. What do you think?
What are some things that make you smile?

Other smile ideas-Have a smile off. See who can smile the longest. Sing songs about smiles. Read or make up a poem about smiles. Talk about other emotions and facial expressions. Remember, those with memory impairments can relate well to emotions. Draw faces with smiles or other facial expressions.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Dementia: Spring Story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be



Spring Chicken Soup for the Soul Story
When I was little, I often helped my mother plant our family's garden. As soon as the chilly winds of Chicago winter gave way to spring, Mom would be outside with a spade, seed packets, gardening gloves, and a secret smile that had been hibernating all winter. That smile never seemed to shine as bright as on those first few days in April when she squatted in the mud with tiny seeds in her hands.
I would pull on my grubbiest jeans, choose my shovel with care, and bound across the yard before Mom could say, "You forgot a jacket!" I would kneel by her side for hours, carefully digging holes and cautiously pushing seeds into the earth with my chubby fingers. We would spend hour after hour repeating the process, until the formerly snow-smothered area barely knew what hit it!
Unfortunately, I grew up. Somehow, I found better ways to spend the first days of spring, and I threw my annual April morning job into the growing pile of childish, outgrown activities. After all, I was too old to kneel in the dirt all day planting some silly seeds. I came to the conclusion that the shopping mall needed my assistance more than Mom did.
Surprisingly, my mother never said much about my decision until two years ago, the spring I turned 14. I was on my way to a friend's house, when Mom stopped me.
"Would you please help me with the planting today?" she asked.
"Oh, Mom, I was just getting ready to leave," I pouted. "I'll probably be gone most of the day." "Well, could you possibly come home a little early and join me in the fresh air?" Mom asked.
I mumbled something along the lines of, "Uh, maybe . . . I'll see."
By the time I left the house, Mom was already in the garden. She looked up for a moment as I walked past, and from the corner of my eye I saw a certain pain and sadness in her gaze. At first my heart told me I should stay to help, but as I got farther from home and closer to an exciting day of hanging out with friends, I forgot my impulse.
A few hours later, as the sun started to fall from its place in the warm, spring sky, I decided to leave my friends a bit early and head back home.
"Mom usually finishes planting around six," I thought. "If I get back soon, I'll still have an hour or so to help her." I felt very noble for my selfless decision. But when I reached home, there were Mom's dirty boots by the door and a small pile of empty seed packets on top of the garbage can. I was too late.
I didn't think much about that day until nearly a year later.
One of my father's good friends suddenly lost his wife to cancer. The doctors hadn't discovered Sara's illness until it was too late. She died shortly after the diagnosis, leaving behind her husband and two small, confused children.
Right away, Mom went south to visit the family and see how the children, David and Rachel, were coping with the sudden loss of their mother. She spent a few hours with little Rachel. When she came home, she told me this story.
When Sara had received her terminal diagnosis, she asked her husband, "What should I leave our children? How do I give them something to remember me by, a symbol of my love for as long as they live?"
Mom learned the answer from Rachel.
"Mommy made me my own garden," Rachel cooed, as she tugged on Mom's hand and led her outdoors. Sara had decided to plant her children something that would live on long after she was gone.
Although the children had helped with the original planting, it was obvious that most of the work had been patiently completed by their mother. The result was a masterpiece, with so much more among the leaves and petals than simple foliage. A piece of Sara's heart and soul was left in full bloom for her children.
As I listened to my mother tearfully tell Sara's story, I realized the true power of a garden. How had I missed it? Our annual planting was not about kneeling in dirt, throwing in some seeds, and hoping for the best. It was about kneeling there together, planting potential life, and creating the best memories possible out of those moments together. I was so lucky to have a healthy, vibrant, caring mother who was always there for me. As I suddenly realized how badly I missed seeing her soft hands place seeds in mine, many things became clear. I began to understand that the pain I had seen in her eyes that day a year ago had come from missing the little girl who was once at her side.
A few weeks later, I came home to find several bags of seeds on the kitchen table. I knew spring planting was near. The following Sunday, I woke to rays of sunlight streaming through my window. I looked outside to see a figure stooping in the dirt. I threw on the first clothes I could find and ran outside.
The first rays that encircled me were the ones streaming from my mother's smile. The first water our seeds encountered were the teardrops sliding happily from my eyes. We worked together all day and didn't stop until nightfall.
I won't ever miss planting day again.

History & Meaning of the Mandala

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some Mandala art information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Many people and cultures have vouched for the mandala’s intrinsic meaning. Buddhists, Tibetans, and Hindus have all derived meaning from the mandala and its captivating beauty. Psychoanalyst Carl Jung has called it “a representation of the unconscious self.” The mandala is widely recognized as a meaningful reflection of its creator. Mandala art therapy & healing can be a great source of reflection on one’s soul.

Mandalas can be seen all around us, but are not just people-centric. They are larger than life. Mandalas represent life as we know it, but they also represent a larger ecosystem and universe that exceeds our consciousness.
The “circle with a center” pattern is the basic structure of creation that is reflected from the micro to the macro in the world as we know it. It is a pattern found in nature and is seen in biology, geology, chemistry, physics and astronomy.
On our planet, living things On our planet, living things are made of cells and each cell has a nucleus — all display circles with centers. The crystals that form ice, rocks, and mountains are made of atoms. Each atom is a mandala.

Within the Milky Way galaxy is our solar system and within our solar system, is Earth. Each is a mandala that is part of a larger mandala.
Flowers, the rings found in tree trunks and the spiraling outward and inward of a snail’s shell all reflect the primal mandala pattern. Wherever a center is found radiating outward and inward, there is wholeness–a mandala.
Source: http://www.mandalaproject.org/Index.html
This couldn’t have been explained more beautifully.

Mandalas are everywhere. They are the structures of our cells, our world, and our universe.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Mandala Art

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some Mandala art

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be















Monday, January 16, 2017

People with dementia may turn to art

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Scientists are doing research on people with Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders to help unravel how the brain works and why these people are interested in creating art. In increasing numbers, people with Alzheimer's disease are picking up paintbrushes or putting drawing pencils to paper. Some turn to art only after Alzheimer's disease has set in, and they may even be inspired by it. Both groups are helping researchers unravel the complicated and intertwined ways that biology produces creativity, including the contributions of inhibition, obsession and other personality traits. "There are virtually no situations where brain damage makes things better," says Anjan Chatterjee, a neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia , who is working on a book about art and the brain. But art is, he adds, one of the few complex aspects of human cognition that doesn't necessarily get worse.
"Think of a mobile where you have different weights that settle into some kind of equilibrium," he says. "If you take away certain weights, the whole system readjusts. In some instances, the art ends up being just as beautiful.
"In other cases, it's more beautiful."

Lester Potts had never picked up a paintbrush before his Alzheimer's diagnosis in 2001, at the age of 72. He had worked in a rural Alabama sawmill through the Great Depression. He served in the Korean War and grew into an even-keeled and dependable civic leader. But when his brain disorder struck, Potts lost the ability to take care of himself, and he sank into depression.
Painting with watercolors as part of a therapy program buoyed him, says his son, Daniel C. Potts. Even more surprising, his father had talent. When Lester brought home his first creation '" a bright purple and yellow hummingbird with green wings and a red head '" his wife asked him who gave him such a beautiful painting

As Lester's disease progressed, his paintings evolved too. And even though he lost the ability to talk or write before his death in 2007, his artwork continued to feature themes from his youth, offering comfort to his family and a fascinating look into the brain of someone with a degenerative and still-mysterious disease.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Dementia activities for spring

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Here are some easy fun, yet mind stimulating activities anyone can do with someone who has dementia.

Connect to nature

In late spring flowers are in bloom. This is the perfect time to arrange flowers and discuss the favorite flowers of all. You can talk about flower colors scents, where flowers grow as well as any other characteristics about flowers that seem appropriate. This discussion and activity will stimulate their mind and give a dementia person a feeling of self worth

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Colorful ideas for those with dementia

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter



Color Activity Ideas related to the picture of the baby looking at toys on the right side of this blog

What color toys do you see?
If prompting is needed, say something like:
   I see a red toy. Do you? What other color toys do you see?

Color ideas--Let’s name some colors.
   Let’s name some things that are usually blue (or any color). Continue as long as the          interest lasts. Remember: give help as needed which may include giving a choice of two.
   What is your favorite color?
   What colors do you think [another participant who is shy or non-verbal] likes? I think[another participant]likes red because (s)he is wearing a red shirt today.        

What happens if we mix two colors, like yellow and blue(or any combination of colors)?  Mix colors as long as there is interest and time.
   Let’s find out! [Leader should have paints and paper on hand and provide a demonstration or directions for the activity.]  

Get more ideas related to this picture as well as other ideas related to other pictures, see Adorable Photographs of Our Baby

Friday, January 6, 2017

Easy Spring riddles trivia and facts

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Q.  What season is it when you are on a trampoline?
A.  Spring-time!
Q.  When do monkeys fall from the sky?
A.  During Ape-ril showers!
Q.  Can February March?
A.  No, but April May!
Q.  What flowers grow on faces?
A.  Tulips (Two-lips)!
Q.  Why is the letter A like a flower?
A.  A bee (B) comes after it!

Question 1:


What does the name 'Irish Spring' refer to?
A soap brand
An euphemism for bad breath
A holiday
An uprising in Ireland

Question 2:

View the provided image.
What is the nickname of musician Bruce Springsteen?
The Soldier
The Boss
Chairman of the Board
The Devil


View Image

Question 3:

View the provided image.
In which U.S. state is the city of Palm Springs located?
California
All of these
Texas
Hawaii


View Image

Question 4:


What kind of animal is the Springbok?
Frog
Antelope
Wild cat
Insect

Question 5:


'La primavera', or 'Spring', is Concerto No. 1, in E major which is part of 'The Four Seasons' violin concertos. Who composed "The Four Seasons"?
Giacomo Puccini
Antonio Vivaldi
Antonio Salieri
Gioachino Rossini

Question 6:

View the provided image.
In what country did the European Revolution of 1848, also known as the Spring of Nations, begin?
Italy
England
Russia
France


View Image

Question 7:

View the provided image.
'Primavera', or 'Spring', is a famous painting by which celebrated artist?
Michelangelo
Leonardo da Vinci
Sandro Botticelli
Titian


View Image

Question 8:

View the provided image.
What is the birth name of TV host and former politician Jerry Springer?
Jeremiah
Gerald
Joseph
George


View Image

Question 9:

View the provided image.
What is the name or the Roman goddess of spring?
Venus
Flora
Primavera
Aphrodite


View Image

Question 10:

View the provided image.
What breed is the dog in the picture?
American Springer Spaniel
French Springer Spaniel
.German Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel

Spring Facts

Spring is one of the four seasons.



  • The four seasons are Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer.
  • Spring comes after Winter and before Summer.
  • Spring is a symbol of rebirth.
  • When it is Spring in the Northern Hemisphere it is Autumn or Fall in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • The Northern Hemisphere is North of the Equator.  The US is in the Northern Hemisphere.
  • The Southern Hemisphere is South of the Equator.  Australia is located in the Southern Hemisphere.
  • Spring begins on March 21st or 22nd.
  • The first day of Spring is called the Vernal Equinox.
  • Vernal is Latin for Spring.
  • Equinox is Latin for Equal Days.
  • On the first day of Spring the sunrise and sunset are about 12 hours apart, everywhere on the Earth and the hours of daylight and night are almost equal. Daylight is a little longer.
  • The Vernal Equinox occurs when the tilt of the Earth’s axis is not facing towards or away from the sun.
  • On the Vernal Equinox the sun is directly above the equator. This also happens on the Autumnal Equinox in Fall around September 22nd.
  • What Happens During Spring?

    • During Spring the Earth’s axis start to tilt towards the sun.
    • The days get longer and warmer.
    • Many animals have babies such as cows, birds, ducks
    • Animals such as bears who hibernate start to wake up and become active.
    • During April you will see more rain showers.
    • During May the flowers will start to bloom.
    • That is where the saying April showers bring May flowers comes from.
    • Easter, Passover, April Fools Day, Earth Day, Arbor Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Cino De Mayo, Holi (festival of colors in India) are all holidays in Spring
    •  

  •  







    Wednesday, January 4, 2017

    A Rose Mandala to Color and Rose Facts


    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is some information to help you celebrate Rose Day which i in February


    Interesting Facts about Roses 

    • Copy this mandala rose picture or have your group create their own mandala art

    Monday, January 2, 2017

    Flower discussion for those with dementia

    Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

    Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


    Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

    Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

    Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

    Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

    The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


    Get your subscription to Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine 

    Flower Week is Soon. Are you ready?

    FLORA'S DIAL
    containing A FLOWER DEDICATED TO EACH DAY IN THE YEAR

    This is an enhanced listing of the index of the book
    alphabetical by Flower Names A-D

    Month Day
    Flower Flower Meaning
    A
    September
    14
    Acacia
    Platonic Love

    September
    16
    Adonis
    Sorrowful Recollections

    March
    25
    Allspice
    Languishing

    April
    8
    Almond Tree
    Indiscretion

    January
    4
    Aloe
    Grief

    December
    8
    Althea
    Dying for love

    December
    29
    Amaranth
    Immortality

    February
    22
    Amaryllis
    Pride

    December
    30
    Ambrosia
    Mutual Love

    May
    1
    American Star-Wort
    Welcome !

    March
    9
    Anemone
    Forsaken

    July
    11
    Angelica
    Inspiration

    December
    31
    Apple Blossom
    He prefers you

    December
    28
    Arbor Vitæ
    Unchanging Affection

    December
    27
    Ash Tree
    Grandeur

    July
    13
    Asphodel
    Unending Regret

    October
    19
    Austrian Rose
    Very Lovely



    B
    February
    27
    Bachelor's Button
    Single Wretchedness

    December
    26
    Balm of Gilead
    relief

    April
    9
    Balsam
    Impatience

    April
    10
    Barberry
    Ill Temper

    July
    12
    Basil
    Hatred of the other sex

    July
    14
    Bay
    Fadeless Affection

    December
    23
    Bear's Breach
    Misery

    April
    11
    Beech
    Prosperity

    July
    15
    Belladonna
    Loneliness

    July
    16
    Bell-Flower
    Constancy

    July
    17
    Bilberry
    Treachery

    April
    12
    Bindweed
    Obstinacy

    April
    14
    Birch
    Meekness

    July
    18
    Bittersweet
    Truth

    June
    20
    Black Mulberry
    I shall not survive you

    June
    11
    Black Poplar
    Courage

    September
    30
    Blue Bell
    Solitude

    August
    18
    Blue Periwinkle
    Early Love

    March
    11
    Blue Violet
    Faithfulness

    September
    17
    Box
    Stoicism

    July
    19
    Bramble
    Weariness

    April
    26
    Bridal Rose
    Happy Love

    April
    27
    Broken Straw
    Trouble ! Trouble !

    July
    20
    Bulrush
    Independence

    August
    22
    Bunch of Currants
    You please all

    August
    1
    Burgundy Rose
    Simplicity

    January
    27
    Burning Nettle
    Cruelty

    September
    18
    Buttercup
    Ingratitude

    August
    16
    Butterfly Orchis
    Domestic Quiet



    C
    September
    19
    Cabbage
    Self-willed

    January
    3
    Cactus
    Ardent Love

    February
    28
    Calla
    Magnificent Beauty

    July
    21
    Canterbury-Bell
    Constancy in Adversity

    December
    20
    Cardinal Flower
    Distinction

    December
    19
    Carnation
    Disdain

    May
    30
    Carolina Rose
    Love is dangerous

    December
    18
    Cedar of Lebanon
    Incorruptibility

    July
    22
    Celandine
    Joys to come

    December
    17
    Chamomile
    Love in Adversity

    May
    2
    Chickweed
    Will you meet me ?

    April
    15
    China Aster
    True yet

    September
    20
    China Pink
    Aversion

    October
    14
    China Rose
    Grace

    December
    25
    Christmas Rose
    Relieve my Anxiety

    December
    24
    Chrysanthemum
    Cheerfulness in adversity

    April
    13
    Cinquefoil
    The Dead

    December
    13
    Citron
    Estrangement

    February
    13
    Clematis
    Artfulness

    December
    11
    Cockle
    Absence

    April
    1
    Columbine
    Folly

    October
    31
    Common Nettle
    Cruelty

    December
    12
    Coreander
    Hidden merit

    December
    15
    Coreopsis
    Always cheerful

    September
    21
    Corn
    Quarrel

    December
    10
    Coronella
    You will succeed

    September
    22
    Cowslip
    Pensiveness

    December
    14
    Coxcomb
    Singularity

    September
    11
    Cranberry
    Cure for heart-ache

    December
    9
    Creeper
    Protection

    September
    24
    Cresses
    Roving

    September
    25
    Crocus
    I am his

    April
    16
    Crocus Blossom
    Youthful gladness

    August
    20
    Crow-Foot
    Brilliancy

    July
    5
    Crown of Roses
    Virtue

    August
    21
    Cuckoo Plant
    Ardor

    February
    11
    Cypress
    Mourning



    D
    August
    23
    Daffodil
    Contentment

    August
    24
    Dahlia
    Elegance and Dignity

    June
    4
    Daily Rose
    A Smile

    April
    17
    Daisy
    I share your sentiments

    August
    2
    Damask Rose
    Bashful Love

    September
    27
    Dandelion
    Coquetry

    November
    24
    Dark Geranium
    Melancholy

    January
    10
    Dead Leaves
    My love has ended

    October
    13
    Deep Red Rose
    Shame

    February
    12
    Dew Plant
    Serenade

    December
    7
    Diosma
    Good for nothing

    September
    26
    Dock
    Shrewdness

    July
    9
    Dog Rose
    Pain and Pleasure

    March
    6
    Dog's Bane
    Deceit

    June
    2
    Double Red Pink
    Unchanging Love

    December
    6
    Dragon Plant
    You are near a snare

    You can use this list to have great discussions about flowers in so many different ways