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Friday, November 17, 2017

Thanksgiving Activities for Those with Dementia

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia How to Eat Right, Keep Calm and Enjoy Thanksgiving with Someone Who Has Alzheimer's Disease or a Related Dementia


According to the National Institute of Mental Health(NIMH) over 5.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Countless others are impacted by their illness. Studies have shown that eating right staves off dementia and slows the decline of someone who already has Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia.


What can you do as a friend, loved one, or health care professional, to make Thanksgiving enjoyable and healthy.


The first thing is to keep it simple. Do not make elaborate dishes that take lots of time. There are plenty of easy healthy recipes out there. Using South Beach Diet, Zone Diet or Weight Watchers recipes is a good place to start. You can modify the recipes according to the dementia persons' likes and dislikes.


Another tip is to involve persons with Alzheimer's disease or a related dementia. Ask them about their preferences. If they say that they do not know, help them by telling them about things you like. Say, for example, I like squash. How about you? Then talk about ways to make squash. In this way, you can discuss every item you want to have for Thanksgiving.
Have them help you prepare the food. Give dementia persons simple tasks to do. Of course, you need to know their strengths and weaknesses to choose an appropriate chore. Make sure the assignment is failure free. In other words, there is no right or wrong way to do it. While you are preparing the food, reminisce about past Thanksgivings. Do not ask: Do you remember when...? Rather say That was so much fun when we...


Have a good belly laugh while talking about the good old days. Remember, research indicates that laughter does make someone feel better.


Fill your home with pleasant soothing aromas. Making a soup before or after Thanksgiving is a good way to do this. Cook the soup on a low flame all day long to let those heavenly smells fill the air.


Do not have too many guests at the meal. Make sure to keep it low key.


You may want to have two Thanksgiving meals. One for you and one for them. The one for them need not be on Thanksgiving Day. Pick a day that you and the dementia person can spend the day together enjoying all the happiness has to offer.


Now that you have read about the tips for healthy dementia dining, go have a great day
The book Adorable Photographs of Our Baby makes a great holiday gift for someone with dementia


Wednesday, November 15, 2017

A Cornucopia of Fresh Thanksgiving Ideas

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


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Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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One of them is called A Cornucopia of Fresh Thanksgiving Ideas

It offers you, the Activities Dittector,other healthcare professional, or caregiver, a number of seasonal activities that can be adapted so they can be used on many occassions.


In a future post, I will discuss some additional tips to make thrse activities extra special

Monday, November 13, 2017

Thanksgiving gifts for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

Get your loved one with dementia a perfect gift to enjoy on Thanksgiving or anytime.

Over 5.5 million Americans are living with dementia. Is one of them someone you know or a client of yours? Get him/her or anyone with Alzheimer's disease or another dementia, a gift that will keep on giving.

Of course, person appropriate offerings are the best. This means matching a gift to a persons interests and abilities, However, there are some presents that will make them smile no matter what.

One such gift is a book by Susan Berg called Adorable Photographs of Our Baby -- Meaningful, Mind-Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals, This book features baby photographs that seniors with dementia love. This book shares a plethora of ideas and resources for you.

Another gift dementia persons will fancy is a classic musical video or DVD especially a musical love story. A classic movie of this type is Rogers and Hammersteins movie, Carousel (1945) or South Pacific (1949)

Any Roger's and Hammerstein movie is a good choice, However matching their interests and favorite actors and actresses should simplify the gift giving process. You can even discuss some of the movies to get a better feel for the one they might like the best.

A video sing along is great for persons who has Alzheimers disease or another dementia. Even if they were not music lovers in the past, music is extremely therapeutic for them. Often non-verbal folks with dementia will sing along to a song that is familiar to them. Russ Carlton has a series of videos that will enchant a person with dementia.

A music download or CD is another good choice. Just as with the movies, talking about songs often brings to light a good musical selection. There are some by Mitch Miller that are favorites of many. Also Broadway tunes are a preference of those with Alzheimers disease or a related dementia.

Especially for a lower functioning person with dementia is the gift of hand or body lotion. Any kind will do. Just be aware of any allergies or pain issues he/she might have. If he/she can tolerate it, those with a pleasant scent work well. Give him/her a relaxing hand massage talking about how good the hand massage feels and how much you love this person,

If you cannot afford or do not have time to get these gifts before Thanksgiving, give the gift of yourself. No matter how hard it is for you to visit a dementia person, he/she will appreciate your company even though he/she may not be able to express it. Take him/her for a walk, sing some of your favorite songs together, or share some messages of love. Just spend some quality time with a dementia person. Both of you will feel better. Do remember to be upbeat animated and excited about visiting.

A phone call or a Thanksgivings day card will do if there is no way you can visit in person. At least they will know you are thinking of them. Then visit on another day.

So no matter what you do, do not forget your favorite friend with dementia this Thanksgiving because it will make you and her feel good. What could be better than that?

Order most of the products mentioned in the article at Amazon.com or from the artists directly

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Think about National Bible Week now

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

National Bible.org





Communities are strengthened and lives are renewed by the reading of the Bible. The celebration of National Bible Week is an annual opportunity to encourage everyone in your community to begin, or to begin again, to read the Bible.


Started in 1941, National Bible Week is celebrated from Sunday to Sunday of Thanksgiving week. Many national events highlight the importance of this week – such as the issuing of a Presidential message, the entering of statementsinto the Congressional Record, and our annual dinner in New York City.


But the real celebration of National Bible Week happens when real people begin to read the Bible.


Local activities focus the attention of the community on the Bible’s spiritual, moral, and cultural values, and inspire people to engage the world’s greatest book.


You can help encourage Bible reading in your community!Here are some activities and events that will encourage everyone to read the Bible for themselves. Get involved in as many of these activities and events as possible.We encourage you to assemble a broad-based group representing all faith traditions using the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures.


Adapt the suggestions below for your community. Share with us what you do and we’ll feature iton our website. Email us at rbeni@nationalbible.org orwrite us at National Bible Association, 405 LexingtonAvenue, New York, NY 10174. 212-907-6427.(continued)


Request your public librarian to create a display of available books about the Bible (commentaries, Bible atlases,study helps) or literature inspired by biblical themes.


Encourage civic clubs such as Rotary, Lions, etc. todevote a meeting during National Bible Week to a speakerwho will develop a Bible-related theme such as the varietyof English translations, or the use of biblical principles inbusiness, etc.


Arrange for a community theater group or college drama club to perform a biblical play, or arrange for a freepublic showing of a film with a biblical theme.


Ask a community choral group or organize a mass choirfrom several houses of worship to present a public concert inwhich all selections are musical settings of biblical texts


Conduct a Bible reading marathon – a cover to cover,non-stop reading of the entire Bible – in a public place such asthe courthouse steps or in a shopping mall. The event takesapproximately 90 hours.


Create a ‘community Bible’ by asking individuals tohand-write the verses. In a larger community, youth groups ofvarious houses of worship could each take responsibility fora book of the Bible. In a smaller community, portions of theBible could be handwritten each year during November untilthe Bible is completed. The finished product might be presentedand permanently displayed in the public library.


Enlist volunteers to regularly read the Bible to theelderly who live alone or in retirement or nursing homes.


Organize a drive to collect used Bibles to be sent topeople who cannot afford to purchase a Bible of their own. Contact your state or regional Bible society or the BibleFoundation for additional information on where and how toship the used Bibles you collect.


Secure permission to use display cases at local shopsor churches to create a public display of unique Bibles ownedby community residents – antiques, large, small, differentlanguages, diglots (two languages in one edition), one carriedthrough a war.


Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaperexplaining how the Bible has impacted American culture andwhy it is important to celebrate National Bible Week.


Provide copies of National Bible Week public serviceradio announcements to each radio station in your community.Enlist a local business person to hand deliver the spots to thestation managers. Contact us at rbeni@nationalbible.org toobtain the spots.


Send press releases to all local media including informa-tion about each of the local activities you have planned. Be sureto provide the name of a contact person.

A sample press releaseis included in the National Bible Week Resource Packet.405 Lexington Avenue • 26th Floor • New York, NY 10174 • Phone: (212) 907-6427 • Fax: (212) 898-1147 • www.nationalbible.org • rbeni@nationalbible.org©1997-2007 National Bible Association.

All rights reserved.National Bible association NATIONAL BIBLE WEEK™Sunday to Sunday of Thanksgiving week each year.

Thursday, November 9, 2017

November is Alzheimer's Awareness Month



Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



November is Alzheimer's awareness month
What are you doing to find out all you can about this mind robbing disease and related dementias?
Visit this blog often to find out the latest news.
Here is what the president had to say
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America
During National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, we recognize the dignity and courage of the men and women living with Alzheimer's disease. We also honor the devoted family members and caretakers who bring them love and comfort, and we underscore our dedication to finding a cure for this tragic disease
...read the whole proclamation from 2011
Become an Alzheimer's advocate

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

"Chicken Soup for the Soul" and fairy tales

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

On Nov 12, we celebrated, “Chicken Soup for the Soul”, Day. I am sure you are familiar with “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories. They are heartwarming true short stories that bring smiles to people’s faces.

Reading “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories are a great time filler. You can have higher functioning residents, students, volunteers or staff members read these stories to the residents. I always read the stories with a lot of expression and enthusiasm asking questions as I read. This way you keep everybody’s attention.

You can find Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories online, you can borrow these books from the library or you can purchase them.

Here are some links to “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories



I hope you will shared some “Chicken Soup for the Soul” stories with your residents this November and other times throughout the year.

Learn why fairy tales have some of the same positive attributes as "Chicken Soup for the Soul" stories in the February issue of the Activity Directors Today E-Magazine

Sunday, November 5, 2017

Veteran's Day-A perfect time to honor veterans(part 2)

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]







Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers,
having a program to honor veterans both alive and deceased at a long term care facility or at your home, seems like the right thing to do this Veteran's Day.

Everyone feels good being honored and honoring those who served in the service no matter what capacity, during war the war.

I always have such a program.It does not cost anything in dollars, but it pays off greatly in raising the mood of everyone.

First I allow each veteran to speak about his/her time in the service. As they age, they may forget some of the details. I try to have a veteran from the community speak as well, to try to fill in the gaps.

Then we sing some patriotic songs

I then allow each person in the audience speak about loved ones and friends who were in the service. I ask them what they were doing
to keep the home fires burning


I give each person a certificate honoring him or her.

Everyone feels so good when we are done.

THANK YOU VETERANS FOR ALL YOU DID TO MAKE THIS COUNTRY GREAT!

Friday, November 3, 2017

Honor veteran's with dementia on Veteran's Day

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



PRLog

Dementia,including Alzheimer disease, affects about 1 in 13 seniors,many of them veterans. As you remember our war heroes on Veteran's Day,think about what you can do for them.They did so much for us



PRLog (Press Release) – Veterans who suffer from various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer disease, often have very specific care needs. It is important that these veterans are cared for by people who understand their condition and have the appropriate instruction and skills.

Therefore encourage family members of veterans to gain the training they need to care for their loved one with dementia.

All people, including those with memory loss, need human contact. They need to be hugged. They need to hear your voice. They may not know you but as long as you know who they are, that's all that matters.

Talk to them about their service to our country. Often they will share stories with you because their time in the service made a huge impression on them

For those in nursing homes and other institutions, make sure veterans with dementia are visited often.

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

What's My Thanksgiving Line?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter 


The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition 
 

Here is a dementia Thanksgiving activity


A Game About Thanksgiving Food for Dementia Sufferers, Long-Term Care Residents



Thanksgiving is right around the corner and will be here before you know it.


This game is ideal for folks with Alzheimer's disease, related dementias, other long-term care residents, those attending adult daycare and people with these diseases living at home.


The group leader can be an activity staff member, other long-term care staff member, a volunteer or family member.


This game is easy to do, a lot of fun, can be adapted and modified for other occasions, and can be used with a wide variety of audiences.


The game is loosely based on the classic television show called, What's My Line. This program originally aired in the 1950s and 60s.


Instead of guessing the guests profession, the guest is pretending to be a Thanksgiving dish.


Before starting the activity, set the stage for the group or individual playing. Tell them that each person is going to pretend to be a food served at a Thanksgiving dinner.


It is probably best to discuss foods eaten on Thanksgiving first. If possible, give each participant a list of food eaten during Thanksgiving. The list can be given before the discussion or after depending on the group's cognitive level. Alternately, you could have a whiteboard or a blackboard and write down the foods as they are mentioned.


As the foods are talked about, it is probably a good idea to discuss the characteristics of the food to remind the group members about the foods. You could include this information on your list.


You will also want to have pictures of popular Thanksgiving foods. You could also write a food name on an index card to hand to the participant who is having trouble thinking of a food on his own. Have a number of cards, each with a food written on it. Also have some blank cards for those who have thought of a food on their own. Handing them the card with the food name on it is a good reminder of the food's name should they forget what they chose.


Remember, folks with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias have poor short term memory.


After the discussion, it is time to play the game. Tell the group or individual again that each person is going to have a turn "being" a Thanksgiving food

Choose a person in the group to be the first contestant. You could be the first player to show everyone how the game is played.

Give the player a card with a
food name written on it or have a short private conversation to decide what the food to be guessed will be

Tell all we are going to ask the contestant about the
food he is pretending to be

Here is a sample list of questions.

Alter it as needed

Is the
food a vegetable, meat, or dessert?

Is the
food served hot or cold?

What color is the food?

You may have to provide a choice of two colors

Is the
food hard or soft?

Is the
food sweet, sour, etc?

Do you
eat the food with a fork or spoon?

After each question is asked and answered, ask if someone wants to guess what the
food is.

Give each person in the group a turn to pretend to be a food.

During the activity, make sure you or the group leader is excited and animated. Make it sound like you are really on a
game show.

You could give out prizes or hugs to those who guess correctly.

This
game is a perfect lead into other discussions about Thanksgiving.

You can reminisce about past Thanksgivings. You can talk about why you are thankful for each person there, or what each participant is thankful for. Planning a Thanksgiving
dinner might also be fun. Also sharing favorite Thanksgiving recipes is sure to be enjoyable.

When you are finished, thank everyone for coming. Tell them how much you enjoyed being with them

November 1 is author's day

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

famous authors

Thumbelina “, “The Ugly Duckling “, “The Little Mermaid “, “The Emperor’s New Clothes “, and “The Princess and the Pea all by Hans Christian Anderson

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll

The Last of the Mohicans and The Deerslayer.by James Fenimore Cooper

A Christmas Carol , Oliver Twist , Nicholas Nickleby, A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield and Great Expectations all by Charles Dickens<샄Ы> </샄ы>

Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Scarlet Letter or The House of the Seven Gables . By Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

The Call of the Wild and White Fang by Jack London

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

The Raven, Murders In The Rue Morgue, The Mask Of Red Death, The Fall Of The House Of Usher, The Black Cat, The Pit And The Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart. By Edgar Allan Poe

Hamlet , Macbeth , Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , The Prince and the Pauper, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court , and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. by Mark Twain

Journey to the Centre of the Earth , From the Earth to the Moon , 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea , The Mysterious Island and Around the World in Eighty Days. By Jules Verne

The Invisible Man, The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau and The War of the Worlds. by H.G. Wells

The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest. By Oscar Wilde

Old Man and the Sea, For Whom the Bell Tolls,
by Ernest Hemingway
 





Saturday, October 28, 2017

Halloween activities for everyone!

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



by Kathleen Milazzo, Chicago Recreation Examiner

Halloween is a wonderful excuse for a party and whether you are hosting one at a nursing home or having it at your own house, there are Halloween activities that everyone can participate in.

One of the most traditional Halloween activities is apple bobbing, however I even have trouble with that activity. The very young, the elderly, and the handicapped have even more difficulty and usually don't involve themselves in that game. For some it can feel as though they are being left out, but not to worry, we can fix that!

First, you need to know if you don't already that Alzheimer patients do not like water. Secondly, it's important with older individuals that you preserve their dignity, so you've got to present the activities to them carefully, especially when it's something that the young usually do. You may want to remind them that at their age they've earned the right to kick back and have some fun. You can also tell them that bobbing for apples in water is a kids game but that you've got a version that's a little more dignified for adults. Tell them they'll have fun and what do they care what anyone thinks. Finally start off by reminiscing and discussing with them how they celebrated at Halloween parties when they were young. Get them to laugh and remember if they can.

To further get them in the mood, costumes are in order. You only need to get some funny masks and/or hats. They can feel more a part of the party at little effort and cost.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Halloween Memories – Mental Boost for Seniors

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Suite101

Katrena Wells

Seniors with Alzheimer's or dementia may recall Halloween traditions from years ago. Find tips for reminiscing that may boost mental health in older adults.

Older adults with dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease may be able to recall memories from long ago even if they do not have an intact short term memory. For example, a senior with dementia may not remember what he had for lunch but may be able to tell you many details about his first car.

Caregivers of people with dementia are often challenged to find meaningful activities for people with cognitive dysfunction. Reminiscing is one way to capitalize on the person’s strength of long-term memory, which can boost their feelings of self-worth, emotional well-being, and may provide insight into a time that may soon be forgotten.

The setting for reminiscing may be formal, as in the case of a group setting in a long term care facility or nursing home, or it may be more informal in a one-on-one conversation. By preparing a few questions in advance, the caregiver may be able to assist the senior to enjoy memories and perhaps even a laugh.

Family Traditions of Halloween in the Past
Years ago, Halloween traditions were quite different from modern commercialized trends of today. Many younger people today may have no idea what cow tipping or a Johnny house is, but an elder may readily tell others all about these and many other Halloween jokes of years ago.


Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Dementia and Halloween

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



Eons

Dementia/Alzheimer’s and Halloween have something in common- they are both scary! To an dementia/Alzheimer’s person Halloween can be destabilizing because of children constantly ringing the doorbell, strange decorations, confusing costumes and ghostly creaking sounds which contribute to the spirit of the holiday. This doesn’t mean you can’t celebrate, but you might want to reevaluate the ritual to see it with Dementia/Alzheimer’s eyes.

Here are some tips for a fun Halloween:

•Prepare for the celebration by discussing your plans with the Alzheimer’s person and describing the holiday dynamics like trick or treaters. For example, show your loved one a decoration and ask, “Do you like this decoration?” If he or she says, “This frightens me,” then respect this perception. Don’t try to talk him or her out of it. Most patients will be okay with pumpkins and cats; however, witches and ghosts might be unnerving.

•Keep furniture in its place. Consequently, your loved one will not become confused or even worse, bump into things and fall. Dementia affects balance and perception. Watch out for low-lying candles! It’s always easier to prevent than to treat.

•Avoid rigging up strange sounds like ghostly laughter or creaking doors because they bombard people with too much stimuli.

•Let neighbors know that candy will be placed outside the door, (the honor system), so that children will not keep ringing the doorbell and frightening your loved one. Or put up a note on the door with instructions for trick or treaters. However, if your loved one is adequately prepared and looks forward to the children at your doorstep by all means let them come in and strut their stuff!

•Know your loved one’s dietary restrictions, especially if he or she is diabetic. If you keep Halloween candy in a nearby bowl, you might be surprised that much of it will be missing. Those candy corns can give anyone a sugar rush! Instead place some healthy, colorful treats like cut-up apples with cinnamon or berry/yogurt parfaits. Bake your own pumpkin pie using wholesome ingredients as you follow a lighter recipe.

Halloween can be tweaked and personalized to communicate a meaningful updated ritual. Both you and your loved one will enjoy the current anticipation as you tap into a positive memory of past celebrations. Make decorations together to maximize the occasion. Art therapy provides positive stimulation and creative self-expression. And while you are coloring and pasting, play music in the background, preferably from your loved one’s time period, for happiness synergy.

Did you ever think that Halloween can be scary for your parents with dementia??

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Sayings for inside Christmas cards

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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A Christmas candle is a lovely thing; It makes no noise at all, But softly gives itself away; While quite unselfish, it grows small. -


And the angel said unto them, "Fear not! For, behold, I bring you tidings of great joy, Which shall be to all people. "For unto you is born this day in the city of David A Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you: Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, Lying in a manger. -
Are you willing to believe that love is the strongest thing in the world - stronger than hate, stronger than evil, stronger than death - and that the blessed life which began in Bethlehem nineteen hundred years ago is the image and brightness of the Eternal Love? Then you can keep Christmas. -

At Christmas play and make good cheer, 
For Christmas comes but once a year -

Best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year.

Bless us Lord, this Christmas, with quietness of mind; 
Teach us to be patient and always to be kind. –

Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, everything is softer and more beautiful. –

Greetings of the Season and Best Wishes for the New Year

Holiday Greetings and Best Wishes for a New Year of Happiness in a world of peace.

Holiday Greetings!. . . celebrate each day.

I wish we could put up some of the Christmas spirit in jars and open a jar of it every month. -

May Peace be your gift at Christmas and your blessing all year through! 
May peace, love and prosperity follow you always.

May the Blessings of Christmas be with you today and always.

May the Holiday Season bring only happiness and joy to you.