"Memory Lane TV" Soothes Anxiety & Agitation in Dementia

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Monday, July 24, 2017

Experiencing Life, Briefly, Inside a Nursing Home

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New York Times



“When I came in, I was worried about working with older folks because I was afraid I wouldn’t be good at it,” Ms. Murphy said. “Now, if anything, I’m worried I’ll love them too much and it will really hurt to work with folks at the end of their lives.”

there. During her going-away party they presented her with a big card, and shouts of “We love Kristen” were heard throughout.

The program has solidified Ms. Murphy’s desire to work with older people. And the hardest lesson she learned — that for some people, it is better to be in a wheelchair or to have limited mobility — will make her become a better doctor, she said.

“As a doctor, my job is to help patients live the life they want to,” she said. “And if they’re in pain, you have to say ‘That’s O.K. if you want to spend your time in a wheelchair.’

“For me that’s such a different place to be. Because I hate this chair. It still startles me that that’s the choice.”

Ms. Murphy said the care she received at the home was outstanding. But there were things that could use improvement: she did not realize she could ask for things like soda, and she felt that shower bars were too high for someone in a wheelchair. She also told the staff at a debriefing session that families should be included in more activities.

Dr. Phillips of the American Geriatrics Society, which is not involved with this program, said the challenge was to see “how this replicates everywhere else and how enthusiastic medical students are to take this on.”

Another of the 10 students who have gone through the program, William Vogt, spent 10 days last summer in a nursing home at the Veterans Affairs hospital in Augusta, Me. Mr. Vogt, who spent a day wheeling around with petroleum jelly smeared on his glasses and cotton stuck in his ears, said he was particularly struck by the fact that many patients considered the nursing home to be home and the staff “a second family.”

Mr. Vogt said the little things counted, like lowering nameplates so patients could locate their rooms and not putting a remote on top of a television, out of reach.

“There’s a little part of it that works its way into everything I do, from patient interaction and awareness of how I come across to what I say,” said Mr. Vogt, a medical student doing clinical work at a hospital in Watertown, N.Y. “There’s this shift of the humanity of it.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

August Activity Newsletter

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Here is an August Activity Newsletter courtesy of Eldersong.

One idea was to reminisce about jobs
Here are a couple of
coversation starters
**Reminisce about household chores and responsibilities. Ask: What did your parents teach you about work? What kind of chores or tasks did you have as a child/teen - e.g., shovel snow, cut grass, wash dishes? Did you receive an allowance?

**Share recollections about participants’ first paid job outside the home, including memories of bosses, duties, pay, hours, co-workers. List common jobs for 1940s teenagers, e.g., bus boy in a restaurant, locker room attendant at the YMCA, soda jerk, usher in movie theatre, paper boy.

**Listen to the old Disney tune "Whistle While You Work"

**Ask the ladies if any had a career as a homemaker. Write a job description for the position! Ask: Which household jobs did you enjoy the most? The least?

**Read Walt Whitman’s poem "I Hear America Singing," which honors workers

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Brain Exercises for Dementia


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Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]



eHow

Dementia, a condition affecting the brain, causes loss in memory and thinking skills. Dementia gets worse over time. The key is slowing down progression of this condition. One way to do this is to engage those with dementia in mentally stimulating brain exercises. Exercising your brain throughout your life is beneficial if you succumb to dementia. After your loved one has dementia, the trick is finding the right activities so your loved one keeps functioning at the highest possible level.

Predementia
According to a study published in the August 4, 2009, issue of Neurology, people who devote effort to activities that exercise the brain, such as reading, writing, and playing card games, may delay the rapid memory decline that occurs if they later develop dementia. The study found that for every activity a person participated in, the onset of rapid memory loss in dementia was delayed by 0.18 years.

"The point of accelerated decline was delayed by 1.29 years for the person who participated in 11 activities per week compared to the person who participated in only four activities per week," said study author Charles B. Hall, PhD, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y. This means start engaging in activities that exercise your brain.
Best Exercises
It is best to involve yourself with....read all of Brain Exercises for Dementia

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Non-verbal communication (part 2)


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Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Power to learn

contimued from July 10

Tell each team that when you say “Go,” they will have five minutes to work as a team to put the picture together. This time period can be flexible based on the level of the group.
9. Ask if there are any questions. And then, as a last minute piece of instruction, tell the group, “Oh, I almost forgot to tell you, you have to complete the task by not talking.”10. Ask if everyone understands what to do. Say “Go,” and let the teams begin to work.
11. As the teams work, move among them to observe how they act as a team. Caution a team or individual team members should they start to talk.
12. Call time.
13. Guide a discussion on communication by asking the following questions.
• Did all of the teams put their puzzle together? (Show of hands)
• First, involve the teams that competed the puzzle. Ask:
􀂃 Do you think that you worked as a team to complete the puzzle?
􀂃 How did you work together?
􀂃 Did you have trouble not talking?
􀂃 Did you want to talk?
􀂃 What were other ways you found to communicate with one another?
􀂃 What did the leader of your group do?
• Second, (if applicable) move to the teams that did not complete the puzzle. Ask:
􀂃 Why do you think your team did not complete the puzzle?
􀂃 What do you think needed to happen for your team to be able to complete the puzzle?
􀂃 What did the leader of your team do?
• Third, work with the pictures involved in the puzzle by asking the following questions.
􀂃 What did your picture show?
􀂃 Were the people in the picture a team?
􀂃 Why were they a team? What were they doing that made them a team?
􀂃 Are the people in the pictures communicating?
􀂃 Is their communication always verbal? If not, what are some examples of people doing their jobs without necessarily talking?
14. Return to your original questions at the beginning of the group.
• What is a team?
• What is the role or responsibility of each person on a team?
• What happens when someone does not do his or her part for a team?
15. Bring closure by asking the participants to think about what happened during their team activity. Ask the following question:
• Do you think you were a good team member?

Sunday, July 16, 2017

Non-verbal communication


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two







Get your subscription to Activity Director Today's e magazine

Power to learn


Communicate — Without Talking?

Synopsis:
In this activity participants will learn the value of verbal communication and the value of working together. In groups of four, members will have to assemble a puzzle without communicating verbally. After this activity, you will lead a discussion to help them understand the importance of communication and cooperation.

Body:
1. Before starting, select a variety of large pictures that show people working together in various environments. Examples are: scenes involving a construction site, restaurant scene, athletic event, and an accident scene. You need one picture for every four participants in the group. Cut each picture into at least four pieces (one per group member) so that the picture becomes like a puzzle. Depending on the level of the group, you could have more or fewer pieces of a single picture and can also vary the size of the individual puzzle pieces.

Ask the following questions:
• What does communication mean?
• Do you think you can communicate well with other people?
• How do you know that you communicate well?
• What are some of the ways in which you communicate with people?
Now divide the group into teams of four each.

Now ask
• What would you call your group of four people? (Team)
• What does the word “team” mean?
• What is the role or responsibility of each person on a team?
• What happens when someone does not do his or her part for a team?

Friday, July 14, 2017

Flowers, fresh ideas are in bloom

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Here is an idea for your facility or home


For residents and staff of Wood Haven, everything's coming up roses. And petunias. And zinnias. And geraniums.
That's because a concerted effort to beautify the grounds and involve residents came into bloom this spring. The KaBloom program, thought up through a group effort by programming staff and administrators, saw well over 300 flowers and vegetable plants planted at the care facility, 1965 E. Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green.
"It's been known that gardening has been able to lower blood pressure and increase brain activities and give a good general feel to whoever is doing it. We are doing all kinds of different activities. The KaBloom program pretty much came out of getting the residents outside on nice days in May and to get the employees involved and the families involved," said Jeff Orlowski, Wood Haven's administrator. "We're completely different than we were three years ago at Wood Haven. We wanted to get more colors outside and show this is an inviting place and wanted everybody to take pride in living here, working here and visiting here."
The residents continue to take care of the plants that have been installed, and some tend to elevated beds that eliminate the need to stoop and kneel when they garden. Orlowski said some of the raised beds contain herbs and vegetables that the residents can take care of and eat. KaBloom is also spurring more activities beyond planting and tending, and some residents are making garden stones to be placed throughout the grounds.
"The whole focus of these activities, and this is our overall goal at Wood Haven, is providing an outstanding experience, and activities are so much a part of that," Orlowski said. "We brainstormed with a bunch of ideas and kind of used the inspiration of a cruise ship. On a cruise ship, there are nonstop activities for all ages to enjoy, and we kind of wanted to use that as a guideline. We asked, 'what can we do to get more people involved, to have more activities' and so forth."
Many staff members and numerous residents and their families were involved in the initial effort this spring. The plants that can be seen around Wood Haven include mock roses, petunias, geraniums, zinnias, daisies, impatiens, basil, lavender, thyme, chives, parsley, tomatoes, green peppers and sunflowers, "for Bob," Orlowski said.
Community Relations Director Chris Stearns notes resident Bob Boyer is very involved in the KaBloom program and he also requested hollyhocks to add an additional punch of color.
"He's very into the courtyard, the flowers and the vegetables out there," Stearns said, "He told them he wanted hollyhocks out there. I haven't seen any flowers yet, but they did plant some hollyhocks out there for him."
Stearns said the plants, which are a mix of perennials and annuals, were obtained from Joseph's Greenhouse for a discount. Orlowski said the KaBloom program will be repeated annually.
"We'll invite families, staff and community to come out and get their thumbs dirty," he said.
The flowers and vegetables are just part of what's currently blooming at Wood Haven, which has been in existence in its current location since 1971.
Orlowski said that a host of renovations to update the facility are underway, and they are in phase three of five phases.
"We are scheduled to be completed in September. They are currently working on phase three. Phase three and four involves redoing the hallways and phase five will be the main lobby. We are doing the main lobby, the hallways, the dining room and we have already painted the residents' rooms," he said. He has a long history with Wood Haven, as he used to volunteer at the center while attending Bowling Green State University in the mid-90s, and noted the building needed updates.
"We've updated the residents' rooms," Stearns said. "It's more modernized."
One feature that Orlowski is particularly excited about is the upcoming transformation of the facility's dining room. In an effort to give residents more choices, the dining room will become two restaurants.
"We're actually going to be turning our dining room into two restaurants. One will be called the Wood Haven Grille where you can get traditional meals and the other one is going to be called Le Cafe Au Bois, which is going to be a French cafe concept. That will be open for breakfast and lunch, and on nice days, residents can eat on the cafe's patio outside, which I think is a first in this area," Orlowski said. Families and visitors will be able to eat meals with their loved ones at the restaurants with residents.
Orlowski notes the support of the Wood County commissioners as being a key help in bringing the updated vision of Wood Haven to fruition.
"It's great that the commissioners are 100 percent pushing this and supportive of this. We are very fortunate that they really care about the residents here at Wood Haven and making it a success," Orlowski said.
Wood Haven is a skilled and intermediate nursing facility that offers both long-term care and short-term rehabilitation. The 95-bed facility is both Medicare and Medicaid certified and accepts most private insurance. Wood Haven Health Care is owned and operated under the Board of Wood County Commissioners.
It's history in the community is long. In 1868, the Wood County Board of Infirmary Directors purchased a 200-acre farm on which to build a three-story building to house the county infirmary. Additions in 1892 included a barn, staff quarters and a new resident wing. In 1913, the governing powers were transferred to the county commissioners, and the Infirmary became the Wood County Home in 1919.
In 1971, the county home was relocated and replaced with a modern 125-bed, single-story brick building and dedicated as the Wood County Nursing Home. The original building and acreage was turned over to the Wood County Historical Society in 1973 and currently houses the Wood County Historical Society and Museum.


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

An activity for long term care residents."If I Were a Milkshake"

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Here is a story you can use as acretive activity by having residents make up a story about chocolate milkshakes especially for chocolate milkshake day.

They can fill in the underlined words with different words if they so choose. Even those with dementia will find this story and activity fun.

If I Were a Chocolate Milkshake

If I were a chocolate milkshake most people would like me because I am smooth, creamy and sweet. People like me especially in the summer because I am cold.

I am made with some favorite ingredients of many people. These ingredients are milk, ice cream and chocolate sauce. Some extra things you can add to this delightful drink are whipped cream and chocolate chips.

Most people put the ingredients in a blender to ensure the creaminess of the me. I am usually served in a tall glass especially for made for milkshakes.

Children especially like me. But many adults like me too. I am glad I can make so many people happy.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Chocolate milkshake recipes

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Recipe#1




Original recipe makes 2 serving Change Servings

Directions
Combine the ice cream, diced chocolate, and 1/2 cup whipped cream in a blender. Blend until smooth. Pour into glasses, and garnish with 1/4 cup whipped cream and chocolate shavings.
Recipe#2

Original recipe makes 1 serving Change Servings

  •        
  • In a blender, combine ice cream, drink mix powder and milk. Blend until smooth. Pour into glasses and serve
  • Best Milkshake ever.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

History of a milkshake

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Did you know that the first reference to a milkshake appeared in a British newspaper in 1885? The original recipe called for a shot of whiskey! Milkshakes were popular at soda fountain counters in the early 1900s and are now a mainstay at ice cream shops, diners, and fast food restaurants throughout the country.
, the milkshake, as we know it today, was invented by a Walgreen's employee in Chicago

in 1922. He added two scoops of ice cream to a drink called a malted milk. Although the concept of milkshakes had been around since about 1885, it wasn't until that fateful day that the drink became popularized.

. The first milkshakes were a kind of alcoholic eggnog, first appearing in print around 1885. In addition to tasting great, they were said to have also served medicinal purposes.
By 1900 they were enjoyed purely for refreshment, and without the alcohol, but it wasn't until 1922 that they made their giant leap into widespread popularity. That's when Ivar "Pop" Coulson -- a Walgreens employee -- added two scoops of ice cream to a regular malted milk drink. The idea spread like wildfire.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Preparing for sundowners


Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great
dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

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TBO.com


If you have a loved one or client with Alzheimer's whose confusion appears to increase during the latter part of the afternoon, you're not alone. This is a symptom which many Alzheimer's patients will go through. It is called, "Sundown Syndrome"—also known as "Sundowning." This descriptive term describes the onset of heavier confusion and intensified agitation. Usually, this begins anywhere from late afternoon to dusk. But in reality, it could happen anytime throughout the day.
Around 4:45 p.m.—everyone in my house got a new name, possibly two. My father, who didn't seem to need a clock for this, went through this change daily toward the end of the moderate stage of Alzheimer's disease.
Experts believe one of the contributing factors is a shift in their biological clock, caused from the change of daylight to dark. Keeping the house well lit during these hours will help immensely.
Physical and mental exhaustion is one of the biggest culprits. An Alzheimer's patients' days consists of coping with who's who, "where am I," and living in the past. This would mentally drain anyone.
Once again, routine is the most helpful thing for memory-impaired loved ones. Evening hours usually become the busiest in a household; people coming and going, cooking supper, phone calls and the list goes on. If the traffic in your home is high volume, try placing them in a quieter
For a caregiver, one of your best stands for defense will be to be prepared beforehand.
As the hours of daylight change with the seasons, always have you house lights turned on an hour before day's end, never allowing shadows to invade your home. Also, when you sense that a heavy bout of confusion is advancing, try to keep them preoccupied with some kind of activity. Place a photo album in their lap, anything that will redirect their jumbled thoughts. This may call for a little trial and error before you find something that is truly effective.
There were days when I swore my father's Sundowners would last morning 'til midnight. I also recall noticing similar reactions on dispiriting rainy days. Once anxiety builds, it's difficult to turn it around. Keep evenings as calm, routine and simple as possible. You just have to continue doing the best that you can.
Gary Joseph LeBlanc was the primary caregiver of his father for a decade after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and has published a new expanded edition of his book, "Staying Afloat in a Sea of Forgetfulness", d
.
These are great suggestions. A book with baby photos might be a good diversionary tool

by Susan Berg author of Adorable Photographs of Our Baby-Meaningful Mind Stimulating Activities and More for the Memory Challenged, Their Loved Ones and Involved Professionals a book for those with dementia and an excellent resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

4th of July heroes

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

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The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Celebrate America
Holiday Heroes
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Abigail Adams
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John Adams
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Crispus Attucks
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John Hancock
 
 
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Benjamin Franklin
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Thomas Jefferson
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Colonel Tye
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