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Sunday, August 30, 2009

Activities for Alzheimer's Disease Patients

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities



eHow

by Molly Land

It can be a challenge to come up with ideas for activities for Alzheimer's disease patients. With moderate and advanced Alzheimer's, the patient may have an extremely short attention span and poor control over her physical movements. Patients with early Alzheimer's can become depressed or frustrated over their inability to perform tasks they once found easy

Enjoyable Activities
Engage your patient in an activity that was once enjoyable to him to see if it stimulates interest. Any activity that he enjoys doing that engages his mind and lets him perform physical movement will benefit his body, mind and spirit. The goal of the activities should be to provide pleasure and not to try to get your patient to perform at a certain skill level. For example, if your patient was once an avid gardener, let him get his hands in the dirt and pull weeds or plant seeds.

Group Activities
Play games that appeal to all skill levels, like batting a balloon hanging from a string suspended above a round table at which the patients are seated. If possible, separate your patients according to the severity of their disease so the less impaired can work on puzzles and read books, while those in later stages of the disease are kept occupied with simpler activities like squeezing stress relief balls and playing balloon tether ball.

Dignity
Treat your patients with dignity and as the adults that they are, even though they may act childlike. Avoid games and puzzles that are obviously for children and are branded with cartoon characters. Puzzles are good for exercising the mind, but it is better to choose puzzles with nature themes or animals instead of cartoons.

Passive Activities........read more Activities for Alzheimer's Disease Patients

Friday, August 28, 2009

Activities for elderly in residential care. we have tried bingo dancing crafts gardening

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities



Gardeningcaretips.com

Well I work in a nursing home and I am a Activity Assitant. And yes I love my job.

Here is what we do. We make a calander every month And for every day we put like two to three activities, I am sure that what we do is kind of different, and where you are you might not have the finances. But anyways we have activities where we have people come in and sing, we do manicures and messages, Fruit bingo, prize bingo, (we do prize bingo every Wednesday, and Fruit bingo every Saturday.) On Sundays we do coffee and donuts in the afternoon and two Sundays of the month we have church services. We go on four outings a month (one once a week,) we have a shopping trip everymonth, then we go to like restaruants, or this past month we went to the Zoo, and next month we are going to a baseball game, once a year we also go to a hockey game. We also do a lot of activities involving food (that seems to attract most of our residents) we have popsicle parties, ice cream socials. We also do two activities room to room, a book/magazine cart, and a snack cart and we usually do those two times a month each. You could try a writing club, and ask them questions that they can write about, example: what was your favorite child hood memory, what is one thing your parents use to say to you, ect. but make sure you discuss it with them. I hope this has helped and if you would like some more ideas I have plenty, feel free to email me anytime,
Kdalise@yahoo.com.

For more Activities for elderly in residential care

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Was your group activity a success?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information
Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities



When you run a group activity, you want to know whether it was succseeful or not.

If the group member is low functioning with dementia, it is sometimes hard to judge this.

Remember it is the process not the product that counts when you do any activity especially a craft or cooking activity.

Ask yourself these questions:

Did the group member have fun?
Did the group member smile?
Did the group member laugh?
Did the group member socialize?
Was this activity meaningful to the group member?
Can you answer yes to one of these questions?
Then the group was a success.

Friday, August 21, 2009

What activities and crafts are good for the elderly at a nursing home?

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

lululaluau
Aug 14th, 2009 at 7:32 pm

My Mum and Sister both manage "Retirement Flats" and from what they’ve said, if you can find someone who can play the piano or something, that’s a good start. Their old ladies love a good sing-song. I’m sure a lot of the elderly people there will have great sewing skills, so what about making a patchwork quilt together? If each person sews a square then everyone could get involved.

I’ll have to ask my Mum for any more tips.

2 thetiredpostman
Aug 14th, 2009 at 7:32 pm

BINGO!!!!!! without a doubt

3 spensmum
Aug 14th, 2009 at 7:32 pm

Bingo always go down well with the elderly, wheelchair / chair excercises, get out the music and have a singalong. When its nice and sunny how about taking some of them out for a walk to the local park. Theres lots of things you could do.

4 xHx
Aug 14th, 2009 at 7:32 pm

knitting
jigsaws
bingo
my aunty used to play the piano for them
painting

5 Rags
Aug 14th, 2009 at 7:32 pm

My Nan lives in sheltered housing and they do a lot of arts and crafts projects. They also have quiz afternoons on general knowledge. A big favourite with them was encaustic art. Abstract stuff is easier when people maybe have poorer eyesight. A history session when they all get to recall their childhood memories is another popular one.

6 Daisyhill....... for more go to Travel Norses

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Alzheimer's Disease Activities

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

eHow

Over 25 million people worldwide live with Alzheimer's disease. Bringing activities to those suffering brightens their day and makes life easier for their caregivers.
Activities keep their minds and bodies as sharp as possible in a fun way if correctly done.

Because of brain damage, people with Alzheimer's disease can display inappropriate behavior. They can show signs of depression. Make them happier with activities. In short improve the quality of life of those living with Alzheimer's disease

Why Activities

Activities are important for persons with Alzheimer's disease because those engaging in activities hold onto their remaining cognitive skills longer according to Dr. Paul Raia, Director of Patient Care and Family Support of the Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts Chapter. Cognitive skills include memory, logical thinking, concentration, reasoning, perception, and intuition. Activities provide mental stimulation and reminiscing opportunities. Activities give those with Alzheimer's disease a sense of purpose and self worth. People with Alzheimer's disease involved in activities have less problem behaviors and sleep better at night. Activities provide a social outlet. Socializing can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease according to the Rush Memory and Aging Project study.
Because success at activities improves the mood of people with Alzheimer's disease, depression is less likely.

Which Activities

The type of activities that persons with Alzheimer's disease do depends on their interests, past and present, and their skill level. Simple short activities are best. It is best to have a daily routine that has a lot of room for flexibility.

Engage the person in activities using life skills of former jobs he or she may have had. For example, if the person was a homemaker, she may enjoy folding clothes, setting the table, or preparing simple dishes. Participating in physical activities expends energy. We all benefit from being out in the great outdoors. The sunshine, the smells, the sounds bring back happy memories. Sunshine is a source of vitamin D. The article, "Does Vitamin D Reduce the Risk of Dementia?" by William B. Grant, Ph.D. published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease in May 2009, discusses how appropriate levels of vitamin D benefit persons with Alzheimer's disease.

Singing is good for the lungs. People with Alzheimer's disease sing the words to familiar songs even though they may not speak otherwise.
Many folks with Alzheimer's disease enjoy watching a musical program, video or movie that they can sing along with. They may need you to initiate the singing.
Simple arts and craft projects are a good outlet for self expression.
Playing simple adapted card games enhance memory.
Reciting familiar prayers and religious songs calm people with Alzheimer's disease if religion interested them in the past.
Looking at family photographs or pictures of babies or animals is an enjoyable activity as well.
Implementing Activities
Activities must be success oriented and failure free. Failing at an activity is not an option for persons with Alzheimer's disease. Do not ask,"Do you know who I am?" Instead introduce yourself.
Break activities down into small steps. Give directions using simple short sentences. Repeat the directions in the same way or simpler if necessary. Since attention spans are short, work on projects over several days.
Adapt and modify difficult activities they may have enjoyed.
Compliment often.
Never argue.
Be patient.

Enter their reality. Here is an example: If the person thinks........read all of Alzheimer's Disease Activities

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Move to improve residents' quality of life a welcome development

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

Nancy L. Gorman

As growing numbers of Americans age and need extended care, long-term care organizations have sought to better meet both the healthcare and social needs of their residents. Those who reach the point in life where nursing home care is necessary do not want to live in an environment that feels like a hospital instead of a home.

Over the past several years, alternatives to institutional environments such as the Green House Project, the Pioneer Network and the Eden Alternative have all aimed to encourage genuine homes for the disabled elderly. And, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' recent call for a culture change in nursing homes, the focus on resident-centered care places a priority on residents' rights.

CMS' new rules will encourage long-term care organizations to improve the quality of residents' lives by moving away from the institutional environment. For example, a resident's preferences for a daily schedule should be respected. Also, institutional overhead paging systems, alarms and large nursing stations, and meals served on institutional trays, should be eliminated.

Standards support culture change

The Joint Commission's enhanced standards complement CMS' guidance, support the quality of life and quality of care in long-term care organizations, and embrace the culture change movement so needed across the long term care industry.

Consider the following Joint Commission standards that support this new thinking:

* Standard RI.01.06.05: The resident has the right to an environment that preserves dignity and contributes to a positive self-image.

In long-term care settings, the place where care is provided is also the resident's home. Home is a place where residents feel safe; their possessions are secure and accessible. More importantly, the environment supports their independence and interests.nResidents can personalize their living space with pictures, photos, radios, furniture and afghans. It is important for the organization to support the unique needs and choices of each resident, recognizing that these needs and choices may change over time.

* Standard RI.01.07.05: The resident has the right to receive and restrict visitors.

The organization establishes visiting hours that accommodate the resident's personal preferences.
This standard underscores that space must be provided for the resident to receive visitors in comfort and privacy. Residents also should have the right to refuse to communicate with visitors such as vendors, accreditation surveyors, representatives of community organizations and others. In addition, compliance with the standard requires that individuals who are permitted by law and regulation must be granted immediate access to residents.

* Standard RI.01.02.01: The organization respects the resident's right to participate in decisions about his or her care, treatment and services.

Effective long-term care requires the read all of......Move to improve residents' quality of life a welcome development

Monday, August 17, 2009

How to Host a Poetry Reading at a Nursing Home

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

eHow

By Ariana Cherry-Shearer

Residents at nursing homes enjoy visits and entertainment. Many of them may not have any family or have visitors for long periods of time. When you can share almost anything with these residents, it can have more of a larger impact than you can imagine. If you are an avid poetry writer and even have some friends who are writers, think about visiting your local nursing home or healthcare center to read them some inspiring words.

Contact the activity director at your local healthcare center or nursing home and speak with them about your intentions of hosting a reading at their facility. Set up a day and a time to visit the residents.

Step 2 Gather some of your poems once you have permission from the activity director. Choose shorter and more lively poems to hold the resident's attention for at least a half an hour. You can choose inspirational, humorous, or even some about romance. It might be best to clear away from sad poems, as you are here to brighten the residents day.

Step 3Talk to any of your friends or family members who also write or may just enjoy reading poetry. They could read poems by other well known poets as well. A lot of the residents really enjoy being read to.

Step 4 Introduce yourself to the residents once you make your appearance for the poetry reading. Tell them who you are, where you are from, and just a few things about yourself. Greet everybody with a warm smile, and just relax. They aren't there to judge you. They are just happy to see you.

Step 5 Keep the reading timed to about a half an hour. Most residents can only hold attention for so long. Also they have other activities and meals as well. End your reading with a bright happy poem, and offer to hand out copies of the poems you have.

Step 6 Speak with the...read all of.....Host a Poetry Reading at a Nursing Home

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Try Sharing Poetry with the Elderly at Nursing Homes…

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

Published by lilairthepoet

A poetry club that I formed in my area does readings at our local nursing home. I began doing some of these readings on my own before the club, and found it very rewarding. In all actuality, many people really do enjoy being read to. If you are looking for an appreciative and attentive audience-try speaking with with the activity director at your local nursing home.

Our club probably reads at the home every couple of months. If I get busy, or the home wants us back, the director usually ends up calling me. When you are planning on doing readings, some people may not even think as a home as a venue-but this is a rewarding activity that I do within my daily life.

Gather up a few of your writing friends or just go on your own. Find some of your poems and browse through them. Find seasonal or holiday poetry, humorous poetry, inspirational poetry, or even a few that have friendly humor about getting old. Shy away from poetry that seems dark, sad, or speaks of death. The goal for a poetry reading at a nursing home is to cheer the residents up. And don’t forget to have copies of your poems. You will be surprised at how many residents want copies. Some read over them again later or have staff read them.

If you are interested in sharing poetry at a nursing home in your area, ask to speak to the activity director and set up a meeting. Share some of your poetry with them, and let them know you are interested in entertaining their residents. -Also– if you haven’t already guessed-this is strictly volunteer. My club is non-profit-so we never ask for money when we do poetry readings. The most we ask during a public reading is donations for the area food pantry.

So if you want to brighten someone’s day, share your poetry, or reach out to the community, spread the art of poetry. It really can change someone’s life.

Even those with dementia respond to poetry

Friday, August 14, 2009

Brain Hub That Links Music, Memory And Emotion Discovered

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities



This fMRI brain scan shows areas that respond to familiar music (green), salient memories (red), and music that is perceived as enjoyable (blue). The yellow area, in the medial prefrontal cortex, is a response both to music familiarity and salient memory. (Petr Janata/UC Davis)

ScienceDaily — We all know the feeling: a golden oldie comes blaring over the radio and suddenly we're transported back — to a memorable high-school dance, or to that perfect afternoon on the beach with friends. But what is it about music that can evoke such vivid memories?

By mapping the brain activity of a group of subjects while they listened to music, a researcher at the University of California, Davis, now thinks he has the answer: The region of the brain where memories of our past are supported and retrieved also serves as a hub that links familiar music, memories and emotion.

The discovery may help to explain why music can elicit strong responses from people with Alzheimer's disease, said the study's author, Petr Janata, associate professor of psychology at UC Davis' Center for Mind and Brain. The hub is located in the medial prefrontal cortex region — right behind the forehead — and one of the last areas of the brain to atrophy over the course of the disease.

"What seems to happen is that a piece of familiar music serves as a soundtrack for a mental movie that starts playing in our head. It calls back memories of a particular person or place, and you might all of a sudden see that person's face in your mind's eye," Janata said. "Now we can see the association between those two things – the music and the memories."

His study, "The Neural Architecture of Music-Evoked Autobiographical Memories," will be published online on Feb. 24 in the journal Cerebral Cortex and will appear in the journal's print version later this year.

Earlier work of Janata's had documented that music serves as a potent trigger for retrieving memories. In order to learn more about the mechanism behind this phenomenon, he enrolled 13 UC Davis students into a new study.

While his subjects listened to excerpts of 30 different tunes through headphones, Janata recorded their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI. To assure the best chance that students would associate at least some of the tunes with memories from their past, he chose songs randomly from "top 100" charts from years when each subject would have been 8 to 18 years old.

After each excerpt, the student responded to questions about the tune, including whether it was familiar or not, how enjoyable it was, and whether it was associated with any particular incident, episode or memory.

Immediately following the MRI session, students completed a survey about the content and vividness of the memories that each familiar tune had elicited.

The surveys revealed that, on average, a student recognized about 17 of the 30 excerpts, and of these, about 13 were moderately or strongly associated with an autobiographical memory. Moreover, tunes that were linked to the strongest, most salient memories were the ones that evoked the most vivid and emotion-laden responses.

When he took a look at his fMRI images and compared them to these self-reported reactions, Janata discovered that the degree of salience of the memory corresponded to the amount of activity in the upper (dorsal) part of the medial pre-frontal cortex.

While this correlation confirmed Janata's hypothesis that this brain region links music and memory, it was another discovery that sealed his conclusion.

A lifelong music buff, Janata had earlier created a model for "mapping" the tones of a piece of music as it moves from chord to chord and into and out of major and minor keys. By making tonal maps of each musical excerpt and comparing them to their corresponding brain scans, he discovered that the brain was tracking these tonal progressions in the same region as it was experiencing the memories: in the dorsal part of the medial pre-frontal cortex, as well as in regions immediately adjacent to it. And in this case, too, the stronger the autobiographical memory, the greater the "tracking" activity.

"What's cool about this is that.....read all of Brain Hub That Links Music, Memory And Emotion Discovered

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Dementia Discussion-More About Apples

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

Are Apples in Your Future

If you like bugs, you could be an entomologist. Entomologists are insect specialists that help growers identify the good and bad bugs in their orchards. They also recommend ways to control bad bugs so they don't damage apple trees.

If you like machines, you could be an apple grower, apple packer or apple processor. Apple growers use sprayers, mowers and other machines in the orchards. Apple packers use large machines to wash, sort and pack apples for customers. Apple processors use many different kinds of machines to make apple juice, applesauce and other apple products.

If you like trucks, you could be an apple hauler. Haulers drive to farms and packing houses, load their trucks with apples and deliver them to supermarkets, processors and other customers.

If you like supermarkets, you could be a produce manager or apple buyer. Produce managers take care of the fruit and vegetable section in the supermarket. Apple buyers work with apple growers and apple shippers to get apples for the supermarket to sell.

If you like to sell, you could be an apple shipper. Apple shippers sell apples to supermarkets, restaurants, school cafeterias and other places. They sell apples in many countries including England, Israel, Canada and Costa Rica.

If you like to play "store", you could be a farm market manager. Farm marketers sell apples and other produce at farm stands and country markets. Many farm markets also provide fun activities for their customers such as pick-your-own apples, wagon rides, playgrounds and harvest festivals

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

A Discussion for Those with Dementia-Types of Apples

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

Here is a complete list of types of apples courtesy of All About Apples

Aceymac
Adams Pearmain
Adanac

Akane
Akero
Akifu Fuji

Albany Beauty
Alexander
Alfriston

Alkmene
Allington Pippin
Almata

Ambrosia, USPP #10,789
American Summer Pearmain
Ananas Reinette

Anaros Anderson Jonathan
Andre Sauvage
Anna
Antonovka
Api Etoile

Arkansas Black
Arlet
Aroma

Aromatic Russet
Ashmead's Kernel
Astrachan, Red

Aurora Golden Gala®
Austin Apple (Sponsel cv.)
Autumn Gold (Hein cv.), USPP #9,907

Autumn Pearmain

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-- B --
Bailey Sweet
Baldwin
Ballarat Seedling (Stewart cv.)

Barry
Batmans Tree Battleford
Beacon
Beautiful Arcade
Beauty of Bath

Beauty of Stoke
Bedfordshire Foundling
Belle De Boskoop

Belmac
Belmont
Ben Davis

Benoni Berne Rose
Bess Pool

Beverly Hills
Billie Bound
Bismark

Black Amish
Black Gilliflower
Black Oxford

Blackjon
Blacktwig
Blaze
Blenheim
Blue Pearmain
Blushing Golden

Boiken
Bolero ®
Bonnie Best

Bonza
Bottle Greening
Braeburn

Braestar ® (Brayleet cv.)
Bramley's Seedling
Breakey

Breakwell's
Britemac
Brock

Brown Sweet
Brownlees' Russet
Buckingham

Buff
Bulmer's Norman
Burgundy

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-- C --
Calville Blanc
Calville Rouge d'Automne
Cameo (Caudle cv.), USPP #9,068

Campfield
Canada Red Canada Reinette

Captain Kidd Cardinal Von Galen
Carlos Queen

Carmeliter Reinette
Carpentin Carroll

Cat's Head Champlain Cheddar Cross

Chehalis
Chenango Strawberry
Cherry Cox

Cherry Pippin Chestnut Crab
Chieftan

Chinook, USPP #10,669, PBR #0386
Chisel Jersey
Cindy Red
Cinnamon Spice
Claygate Pearmain
Cleopatra
Coe Fuji (Ebbourcoe cv.), PPAF
Coe's Golden Drop
Cole's Quince

Colvis Spice Connell Red
Coppertone
Corail (Pinova cv.), USPP #11,601
Cornish Aromatic Cornish Gilliflower

Cort Pendu Plat Cortland
Court Of Wick
Court Pendu Plat
Cox's Orange Pippin
Crawley Beauty

Crème D’licious
Creston, USPP #10,739
Crimson Crisp

Crispin
Criterion
Crofton

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-- D --
D'Arcy Spice
Dabinett
Dandee Red, PPAF

Davenport Russet Davey
Dayton,USPP #5,584

Delblush, protected in France
Delcon
Delicious

Detroit Red
Devonshire Quarrenden
Discovery

Doctor Dologo Doctor Hogg Doctor Matthews

Dolgo Crab
Dorsett Golden
Double Red Jonathan

Duchess
Dulcet

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-- E --
Earliblaze
Earlichief Delicious Earligold, USPP #4,820

Early Harvest
Early Joe Early Mcintosh

Early Red Early Strawberry
Early Victoria
Eddie April
Edith Smith Edward VII

Egremont Russet
Ellison's Orange
Elstar

Emperor Alexander Empire
Empress

English Beauty Enterprise (Co Op 30 cv.), USPP #9,193
Epicure

Erwin Bauer
Etter's Gold
Excel Jonagold, USPP #10,314

Exeter Extra Red Gala (Wyles cv.)

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-- F --
Fall Pippin
Fallawater
Fameuse

Fearns Pippin
Fiesta
Fireside

Firmgold
Five Crown Pippin Florina (Querina cv.)

Fortune
Foxwhelp
Franklin

Frauen Rotacher
Freedom
Freyburg

Fuji
Fuji Lynd Spur (Fuji Spike cv.)
Fukunishiki
Fukutami

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-- G --
Gala
Gala Supreme
Galarina (Borkh cv.)

Galaxy Gala (Kiddle cv.)
Gano
Garden Royale

Garland
Geeveston Fanny Geneva

George Carpenter
George Cave
Gernes Red Acre

Gideon Gilbert Gold
Gilpin
Ginger Gold (Mountain Cove cv.), USPP #7,063
Gloster
Gold Rush, USPP #9,932

Golden Crab
Golden Delicious
Golden Earl

Golden Haralson
Golden Hervey Golden Noble

Golden Nugget
Golden Pearmain
Golden Pippin
Golden Reinette
Golden Russet
Golden Supreme ®

Golden Sweet
Goodland
Goof

Granny Smith
Gravenstein
Gray Stark
Green Sweet
Greensleeves
Grenadier

Grimes Golden
Grove

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-- H --
Haas
Hampshire, USPP #8,519
Haralred (Lautz cv.)

Haralson
Harcourt
Hauer Pippin

Hauxapfel
Hawaii
Hawkeye Delicious

Hawley
Hayne's Seedling
Hazen

Henry Clay
Herrings Pippin
Heyer 12

Heyer 20
Hidden Rose Hightop Sweet
Hokuto
Holiday
Holly

Holstein
Honeycrisp,USPP #7,197
Honeygold

Hoople's Antique Gold
Horei Horneburger Pancake

Horse
Howgate Wonder
Hubbardston Nonesuch

Hudson's Golden Gem
Hunt Russet
Hyde King
Hyslop Crab

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-- I --
Idaho Spur
Idared
Imperial Gala ®, USPP #4,121

Imperial Red Delicious Ingrid Marie
Irish Peach

Itzstedster Apfel

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-- J --
Jacob's Strawberry
James Grieve
Jefferies

Jerseymac
Jesse Hall Jonafree, USPP #4,633

Jonagold
Jonagored Supra, ®, Jonagold (Morren cv.), USPP #10,401 and/or USPP #5937
Jonalicious

Jonamac
Jonathan
Jonica Jonagold, USPP #7,146

Jonnee Red Jonathan
Jonwin
Jordan Russet

Jubilee
Juliet July Red

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-- K --
Kandil Sinap
Karin Schneider
Karmijn De Sonneville

Katja
Keepsake
Kent

Kerry Irish Pippin
Keswick Codlin
Kidd's Orange Red

King
King Cole
King David

King of the Pippins
King Of Tompkin's County
King Russet
Kingston Black
Kinsei
Kleinheart (Sponsel cv.)

Knobbed Russet

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-- L --
Lady
Lady In The Snow Lady Sudeley

Lady Williams Lakeland
Lamb Apple Pearmain

Late Harrison
Lawspur Rome
Laxton's Fortune

Laxton's Superb
Leather Coat
Lehigh Greening
Lemon Pippin
Liberty
Limbertwig

Lindamac
Lobo
Lodi

Lombart's Calville
London Apple (Sponsel cv.)
Lord Lambourne

Lord Nelson Lubsk Queen
Lydia's Red Gala (Hilltop cv.)

Lyman's Large Summer

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-- M --
Macoun
Macspur
Magiemer
Magnum Bonum
Magnum Gala (Stiekema 1 cv.), USPP #11,182
Mahogany
Maiden's Blush
Maigold
Malinda

Malus Floribunda
Mantent
Margil

McIndoe's Russet McIntosh
McLean

McLellan
McLicious
McShay

Medaille d'Or Melba
Melon

Melrose
Melrouge
Mendocino Cox

Merton Beauty Merton Delight
Merton Russet
Merton's Charm
Milo Gibson
Mio
Miracle Mac
Mollie's Delicious
Moore Sweet

Mother
Mountain Boomer
Moyer's Spice

Muscadet de Dieppe
Muscat de Bernay
Muster
Mutsu

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-- N --
Nectarapple
Nehou
Newell's Large Winer
Newell's Late Orange
Newtown Pippin
Niagra

Nittany Nonesuch
Norland

Northern Lights
Northern Spy
Northfield Beauty

Northwestern Greening
Nova Easy Gro
Novamac

Novaspy
NuRed Jonathan

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-- O --
Ohio Nonpareil Old Nonpareil Oliver

Ontario
Opalescent Orange Sweet

Orenco
Orin
Oriole

Orleans Reinette
Ortley Ottawa

Ozark Gold

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-- P --
Pacific Beauty
Palmer Greening
Park's Pippen

Parkland
Patterson Paula Red (Arends cv.)

Peasgood Nonsuch
Peck's Pleasant
Perrine Transparent
Perry Russet
Pettingill
Pewaukee
Pilot
Pinata
Pine Golden Pippin
Pineapple (Sponsel cv.)
Pink Lady (Cripps cv.), USPP #7,880
Pink Pearl

Pink Pearmain
Pink Princess
Pink Sparkle

Pinova
Pioneer
Pitmaston Pineapple

Pixie Crunch
Plum Crabbie (Sponsel cv.)
Polka ®

Pomme Gris
Pomme Royale Porter


Porter's Perfection
Prairie Spy
Priam

Priestly Prima Prima, USPP #Reissue 28,435
Primate

Primevere Princess
Prinzenapfel
Priscilla, USPP #3,488
Pristine ®, USPP #9881
Pumpkin Sweet

Puritan

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-- Q --
Quebec Bell
Queen Cox
Quinte

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-- R --
Ralls Genet 'Rall's Janet'
Rambo
Ramsdell Sweet

Raritan
Razor Russet
Red Astrachan

Red Baron
Red Berlepsch
Red Bietigheimer

Red Bouquet Delicious
Red Cortland
Red Delicious

Red Gold
Red Gravenstein
Red Idared

Red June
Red King Red Delicious
Red Prince Red Delicious

Red Rome
Red Royal Limbertwig
Red Spy
Red Wealthy
Red Winesap
Redchief Delicious
Redcort ®
Redfield
Redfree, USPP #4,322

Redmac McIntosh
Redmax, USPP #7,167 Redsleeves

Redspur Red Delicious
Redwell
Regal Gala (Applewaites cv.)

Regent
Reine de Reinette
Reinette de Angleterre
Reinette Gris Du Canada
Reinette Russet
Retina

Reverand Morgan
Revival
Rezista Early Jon-like ®, PPAF
Rezista Gala-like ® (Releika cv.), PPAF Rezista Gold Granny ® (Goldstar cv.), PPAF Rezista Rome-like ® (Rajka cv.)
Rhode Island Greening
Ribston Pippin
Richared

Richelieu
Rocket Red Braeburn, PPAF
Rome
Rome Beauty
Ross Nonpareil Rouville

Roxbury Russet
Royal Court TM
Royal Empire

Royal Gala
Royal Red Delicious
Royal Russet

Rubinette
Rubinola
Runkel

Rusty Coat

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-- S --
Saint Edmund's Pippin
Salome Sam Young
Sandow
Sansa, USPP #6,519
Sayaka
Scarlet Crofton Scarlet Gala (Creech cv.)
Scarlet O' Haralson (Sponsel cv.)

Scarlet O'Hara (Co op 25 cv.)
Scarlet Pippen
Schmidtberger Reinette

Schweitzer Orange Scifresh (Jazz cv.)
Scotia
Scotian Spur McIntosh, USPP #10,770
Seek-no-further
Seiko-fu Red Fuji

Sekai Ichi
Senator
Senshu

September Wonder Fuji (Fiero cv.), USPP #11,193
Shamrock
Sharon

Shay
Shiawassee
Shinsei

Shizuka
Sierra Beauty
Signe Tillisch

Silken (BC 8S-4-33 cv.), USPP #10740, PBR #95-670
Sinta
Sir Prize, USPP #3,988

Skinner's Seedling
Smokehouse
Smoothee ® Golden Delicious

Snow
Somerset of Maine Sonata, USPP #11,601

Sops of Wine
Spartan
Spencer

Spigold
Spijon
Spitzenburg

Splendour
Sponselli (Sponsel cv.)
Spur Gala (Lynd cv.)

Spur Winter Banana
Spuree Rome
Stark Spur Delicious

Starking Delicious
Starkrimson Red Delicious (Bisbee cv.)
Starks Gala

Starr
State Fair
Staybrite Winesap
Stayman
Stayman Winesap
Stearns

Strawberry Strawberry Chenango
Strawberry Parfait

Strawberry Pippin
Sturdeespur (Miller cv.)
Sturmer
Sturmer Pippin
Sugar Shack (Sponsel cv.)
Summer Mac

Summer Pearmain
Summer Rambo
Summer Rose

Summer Treat
Summer Yellow Summerred
Sun Fuji, R Suncrisp (NJ55 cv.), USPP #8,648
Sundance

Sundown (Cripps II cv.), USPP #8,477
Sunny Brook
Sunrise

Sunset
Suntan
Superchief Spur Red Delicious

Surprise
Sutton Beauty
Swaar

Swayzie
Sweet Alford
Sweet Bough

Sweet Delicious
Sweet Gourmet Sweet Russet
Sweet Sixteen
Sweet Winesap
Swiss Gourmet (Arlet cv.), USPP #6,689

Swiss Limbertwig

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-- T --
Tallow Pippin
Taylor
Telstar

Thome Empire
Tiger (Sponsel cv.)
Tioga

Tohoku Toko
Tolman Sweet

Tompkin's King
Top Red Red Delicious
Transcendent Crab

Transparent Tremlett's Bitter
Triple E Fuji (Torres cv.) USPP #12,219

Tsugaru
Tumanga
Turley Winesap

Twenty Ounce
Twin Bee Gala Tydeman's Early
Tydeman's Late Orange
Tydeman's Red

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-- U --
Ultrared Gala (Obrogala cv.)

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-- V --
Valstar Elstar ®, PPAF
Vanda
Vanderpool Red

Victory
Viking
Virginia Gold
Virginia Greening
Vista Bella

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-- W --
Wagener
Waltana
Walter Pease

Waltz ®
Wantage
Washed Russet

Wayne
Wealthy
Wellington

Wellington Bloomless Westfield Seek-No-Further
Westland

Wheeler's Golden Russet White Astrachan
White Winter Pearmain

Whitney Crab
Wickson
William's Pride, USPP #6,268

William's Red Willie Sharp Winesap

Winston
Winter Banana
Winterstein

Wismer's Dessert
Wolf River
Worcester Pearmain

Wyken Pippin

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-- X --
Xavier De Bavay
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-- Y --
Yakata Fuji, USPP #7,001
Yarlington Mill
Yellow Bellflower

Yellow Newton Yellow Transparent
Yellow Tremlett's
York
York Imperial

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-- Z --
Zabergau Reinette
Zestar ™ (Minnewashta cv.), USPP #11,367
Zuccalmaglio's Reinette

Friday, August 7, 2009

Slow onset of dementia with brain activities

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia brain activities

Posted by Sarah Harlan - email

(NBC) - Slowing the onset of dementia may be as simple as shuffling a deck of cards.

A new study confirms playing games, like cards and Bingo, might help delay the rapid memory decline.

Older adults diagnosed with dementia were able to ward off the accelerated memory loss by more than a year if they participated in at least 11 activities that exercised their brain each week, and that included reading, writing, playing games, playing music or even having conversations.

This held true even when.......read all of Slow onset of dementia with brain activities

Thursday, August 6, 2009

Games to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

Brain Blogger

There are many games for computers and gaming systems claiming to help keep your brain young. Is that all hype? There are several ways to keep the brain healthy and active, and these games use a few already known concepts.

The saying “use it or lose it” is especially true when it comes to the human brain. We need daily stimuli, like puzzles to keep our brains exercised. Artistic activities that challenge you like drawing and painting can give your brain the stimulation and exercise needed for long term healthy function. These concepts are all utilized in most of the new brain games, and therefore the games are not all hype, but are proposed to help fight off Alzheimer’s and dementia. Though some scientists think that these games are premature and that the science doesn’t yet conclusively prove their benefit.

So maybe puzzles and artistic challenges alone enough to keep your brain young. An active brain is not necessarily a healthy one. There are several other things you can do to ensure you really keep your brain healthy. As you work to keep your body healthy through exercise and nutrition you are also feeding your brain. Research has shown that exercise develops new blood vessels in the brain that carry more oxygen-rich blood to the areas of the brain responsible for thinking. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle gives you the benefit of avoiding some of the other medical problems and habits that increase the chances of dementia in old age.

When planning your nutrition, remember your brain needs B vitamins. Leafy green vegetables and whole grains give you the folic acid, B12 and B6 necessary for the healthy function of your brain. Keeping your blood pressure healthy and your cholesterol low impacts your brain and is a natural byproduct of a healthy nutritional plan and exercise regimen. Avoiding the use of tobacco and abuse of alcohol lowers the chance that you will experience dementia, while moderate alcohol use can actually improve the health of the brain. There have been many scientific studies that offer preliminary proof that low doses of alcohol have been linked to a reduction in the risk of dementia.

The best options..........read all of Games to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Samarion Fall Prevention System reduces nursing home injuries

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

KPLC


Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of injury deaths and non-fatal injuries. Now, a cutting edge fall prevention system is helping nursing home residents maintain optimal health.

State of the art technology is changing the way nursing homes operate. Inside The Guardian House Alzheimer’s facility in Louisiana, each room is equipped with a Samarion Fall Prevention System. Guardian House CEO, Neal Rider said, “We have a ‘smart’ system, which is a computer system that will learn patient movement and activity.“

Rider says each resident has an individual profile that determines the risk for potential falls. If they are categorized as a “fall risk,“ the computer and motion sensor devices will monitor their every move in bed and alert the staff if anything is abnormal. Looking at the computer screen as an alert comes in, Rider said, “You can see the unauthorized bed exit alert is coming in and you can see the individual getting out of the bed. It identifies where the person is in the building and where other individuals and staff are located throughout the building.“

Falls account for the highest number of injuries in nursing homes and most of them occur when residents are in........read all of Samarion Fall Prevention System reduces nursing home injuries

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Dementia & Person-Centred Care – Advanced Care Planning

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

Lancashire and Information Library Service

Abstract:

Many people want to be able to plan ahead, so that if in the future they cannot make decisions or do things, their wishes will be known. This is called Advance Care Planning (ACP). Although it is part of official NHS policy (NHS End of Life Care Planning), ACP is hardly ever done, and it may become more difficult once a person has memory problems. In the UK, there is very little research into ACP. By the time someone has signs of dementia, families often become involved. We are uncertain how this affects ACP and the views of the person with dementia, particularly with the new Mental Capacity Act which allow families to comment on health, as well as financial, issues. Our study will be exploring the area of ACP, especially in dementia, by

• looking at the experience of other countries through a systematic review of the existing literature;

• finding out what people who have carried out ACP in this country think through interviews and focus groups;

• considering what factors might help professionals to encourage the process of ACP in practice; and

• looking at how ACP might be done better for people with dementia.

The ultimate aim of our study is to produce guidance on ACP for both people with dementia, their families and health care professionals.

Lancashire Care staff can request the full-text of this paper, email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Saturday, August 1, 2009

Strategies for infusing well-being (part 3)

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is interesting information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here are more interesting dementia articles and activities

Long Term Living

Promoting Social and Mental Well Being

Offer a wide range of activity programming that includes card games, like bridge or even simpler ones, or brain teasers, such as Sudoku or crossword puzzles

Identify residents willing to lead sharing seminars or tutor other residents on subjects related to their own careers or interests (e.g., watercolor painting, Internet surfing, and political science)

Set up daily newspaper groups where the residents share information about a specific section to the rest of the group

Have activity items available on the unit for residents to “borrow” (e.g., craft or scrapbooking supplies, playing cards, lending library, sewing materials, model building supplies)


Establish a welcoming committee of residents who mentor new arrivals for their first month by answering questions, encouraging participation in activity groups, and making introductions to other residents

Encourage the formation of clubs (e.g., poker, book, drama, politics, and debate)

Hold contests that promote interaction (e.g., scavenger hunts, team competitions, and dance contests)

Schedule “open mic” events for residents to share poetry, comedy, and musical talents with each other

Organize residents to complete volunteer activities together for the local community



Occupational therapy practitioners are key partners in promoting well-being in the long-term care setting. With science, research, and evidence-based background that places equal importance on the physical, mental, social, and environmental factors that impact participation in meaningful daily activities, occupational therapy practitioners can expertly identify and eliminate barriers to wellness for this specific population of older adults. For example, occupational therapy practitioners can:

assess a resident's physical and cognitive capacity to engage in various facility activities (e.g., confirming a resident has the motor skills and attention to safely assist in assembling lottery calendars for a facility fund-raiser);

modify the environment to promote participation (e.g., installation of wheelchair-height flower boxes in the garden to allow residents to do their own spring planting);

adapt activities to facilitate engagement (e.g., introducing one-handed stabilizing devices and one-handed typing skills to allow a resident with a recent stroke to be able to return to publishing the monthly facility newsletter); and

assist residents in identifying and engaging in those activities of greatest importance to them (e.g., working with staff to develop a morning routine that enables a resident to get up and be ready in time for daily church services).


“The Well Elderly Study,” landmark research published in 1997,1 was the feature article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. This study, conducted by occupational therapists at the University of Southern California, examined the effectiveness of occupational therapy in health promotion efforts for low-income, community-dwelling older adults. Results of this study demonstrated that occupational therapy was more effective than a control group that either received social activity services or no interventions in maintaining a healthy and more independent lifestyle. Subsequent follow-along studies proved the economic value of this preventive approach.

Wellness may seem to be an easily achievable goal if your facility has the programming and tools to address resident needs in a traditional format, but there are steps you can take to promote wellness in your setting even without specific resources.

The evidence for improving the well-being of those living in long-term care settings through occupational therapy and occupation-based interventions is significant. Such interventions can be integrated into daily programming by all staff and at minimal cost through identifying activities that are physically, mentally, and socially meaningful to residents and providing opportunities for engaging in them. If you are having difficulty getting started, ask your occupational therapy professionals to help you make the first step.