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Friday, May 29, 2015

A patient's prayer

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be
 
 
 


A Patient’s Prayer
God, source of all life and healing,

Who can help us grow in wholeness:

Be with me in this time of physical and emotional need.

Help me rest and cope with the challenges I am facing.

Comfort and encourage those who love and care for me

whose lives have been unsettled and disrupted

by my illness and hospitalization.

Guide and give wisdom to the healthcare personnel

who are committed to my treatment and well-being.

In this special moment of my need,

I pray for healing and for inner peace.

I pray for patience and for understanding.

I pray for a deepening of my faith and belief in you,

my loving God. Amen.
This prayer is offered to you by your hospital chaplains

who are also members of HealthCare Chaplaincy.

For additional spiritual care resources and information about
For some people, the thought of praying can be intimidating. To speak directly

to God can leave you speechless, not sure what words to use, where to begin

or how to end. Often, prayer does not rely on words, but on a desire to be closer

to God, reminded of God’s love and abiding care, and hopeful that God will give

you the necessary strength to cope with life’s challenges and be healed.

Your chaplains offer you the support of the following prayer, which you may use

or modify according to your own circumstances, beliefs and needs.May it serve

as a springboard for your own personal and spontaneous prayer.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Why religion is important to those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Even in their later stages, Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia do not necessarily snuff out the spiritual lives of those afflicted, according to many who minister to the elderly.
In fact, familiar hymns and oft-repeated prayers can be an effective way to rekindle memories and touch those whose connection with the world around them has grown tenuous.

Even when individuals remember little more than the tune to a familiar hymn, you have a sense that, internally, they're still worshipping, they get what this is all about.

Patients responded. Familiar rituals and religious symbols seemed to give them a measure of peace.
"Those patients who are able to repeat some of the prayers that are typical for their religious belief seem to be pleased to be able to do that," she said, "and to get the same consolation they ever had from it."

Rabbi Cary Kozberg, chair of the American Society on Aging's Forum on Religion, Spirituality and Aging, went further.
People with dementia, he said, "can sometimes be the most spiritual people, because that cognitive filter isn't there."

"Unfortunately, there are people who believe that folks with dementia have no spiritual needs, because they can't articulate them anymore," he said.

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Ground Hog's Day Activity

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Play with shadows using your hands and a bright light. A portable lamp or a flashlight will do.

Shine the light on your hands or resident's hands so that the shadow of their hands falls on a smooth surface like a wall or table. Invite all to move their hand closer to the light and farther away from the light. Notice what happens to the shadow.

Have them turn their hands in different ways to see how the shape of the shadow changes

Haha.nu

Here is a great site that shows you how to make hand puppets with your hands and a flashlight

This can be a fun activity for those with dementia.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Fishing Game for those with dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Get your subscription to Alzheimer's Care Guide Magazine

For fish, you can either draw simple fish shapes on construction paper, or you can go all out and print off beautiful clip art fish. Another idea is to go to the dollar store. They at times have good fish shapes you can use. If you attach a paper clip or two to the fish, the participant can then catch the fish with their magnetic fishing rod. Your pond can be a good size box that you can hold near the participant. If using the magnetic fishing pole is too difficult, then have them use a good magnet(which you can also get at the dollar store) or just have the person grab a fish.

What's great about this game is how versatile it is. You can have group members catch fish of different colors. You can put letters or numbers on the fish. If you want to practice matching you could have two fish of the same color or shape or with the same number.

Make sure no one tries to eat the paper clips.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Simple sun facts

The Sun gives life to the Earth and the Earth would have no life at all without the energy it receives from the Sun.
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  • The Sun is only one of millions and millions of stars in the Galaxy.
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  • We see it as a large round red ball only because we are much closer to the Sun than to any of the other stars.
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  • Other stars may be larger, brighter, smaller or fainter than our Sun but they are so very far away that we only see them as points of light in the night sky.
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  • The Earth is one of nine planets that orbit round the Sun in what we call the Solar System.
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  • Solar is the adjective from Sun and comes from the Latin word for Sun – sol, which also gives us the French soleil. (and the word for Sun in several mother European languages).
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  • The Sun measures 2,715,395 miles (4.730,005 kilometres) right round (diameter).
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  • The Sun is 92.96 million miles or 149.6 million kilometres from the Earth.
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  • The Sun is bigger than can really be imagined, over one million times bigger than the Earth.
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  • This measurement is taken as one Astronomical Unit and is how we measure distances in our Solar System
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  • Like all stars, the Sun is composed of a great burning ball of gases. It is made of 92.1% hydrogen and 7.8% helium (helium is from the ancient Greek word helios, which means Sun).
    •   The Sun
      Figure 1. The burning heat of the Sun
    • The Sun has six layers.

    • The centre of the Sun is its core which produces all the Sun’s energy.
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    • Around the core is the radiative zone, which carries the energy out from the core.
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    • It takes about 170,000 years for the Sun’s energy to move from the core through the radiative zone to the next layer, the connective zone.
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    • From the connective zone, great bubbles move into the Sun’s surface, the photosphere.
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    • From the photosphere the Sun’s radiation escapes to the earth as sunlight.
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    • It takes about 8 minutes for the sunlight to be seen on the earth after it has left the Sun.
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    • Outside the Sun’s surface, or photosphere, are two further layers of light gases, the chromosphere and the corona (Corona means “crown” in Latin).
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    • These are too faint to be normally seen against the much brighter photosphere but they can be seen on a very dull day or during a solar eclipse (Look at figures 2 and 3.).
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    • In very bright weather it is dangerous to look directly at the Sun without protective glasses.
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    • On a dull day when the sky is overcast, you can often see the Sun’s corona – the bright layer around the Sun’s photosphere.
      The Sun on a hazy day
      Figure 2 The Sun's corona - the hazy bright area around the Sun, seen on an overcast day.
    • As the moon orbits round the earth, it very occasionally comes between the Sun and the earth.
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    • This shuts out most of the light of the Sun and is called a solar eclipse. Sometimes only part of the moon comes between us and the Sun: this is called a partial solar eclipse.
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    • In a total solar eclipse it is often possible to see chromosphere, the layer of thin gas between the Sun’s surface and the Sun’s corona.  You may be able to see the chromosphere as a thin red line in Figure 3 with the corona outside it.
      The Sun Eclipsed
      Figure 3. The moon has eclipsed the Sun which cannot be seen. Only the chromosphere and corona of the Sun can be seen.
    • Sometimes darker spots are seen on the surface of the Sun. These are magnetic areas which are cooler than the rest of the Sun. They are called Sunspots.
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    • Many civilisations, such as the Aztec civilisation in Mexico, have worshipped the Sun.
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    • Many prehistoric stone circles, such as Stonehenge, are thought to have been built as part of religious worship involving the Sun.
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    • In the past many people believed that the Earth did not move and that the Sun rotated round the Earth.
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    • The first scientist to suggest that the Earth and other planets moved round a fixed Sun was Aristarchus of Samos (310-230 B.C.) – more than 2000 years ago.
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    • The scientist Ptolemy, however, writing more than 300 years later, in 140 A.D. said that the Earth was the centre of the universe.  This was believed for another 1400 years.
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    • The great Polish scientist Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543) published a book at the end of his life, in 1543,  in which he tried to prove that the planets orbited round the Sun; the book’s title was De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (Concerning the revolution of the heavenly spheres).
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    • Those people who agreed with Copernicus were often imprisoned and even executed for suggesting that the earth moved round the Sun.
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    • The work of the Italian Galileo (1564-1642) and the German Johann Kepler (1571-1630) reinforced Copernicus’ theory.
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    • The theory of the Solar System was not really fully accepted until the great English scientist Isaac Newton (1642-1727) published his works on the theory of gravity and finally proved that the planets orbited around the Sun. 
    Useful Websites
    NASA Website
    Star Child
    The Sun - Videos