Wednesday, May 30, 2018

A Flag Day Story

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you
can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

A Flag Incident
By M. M. Thomas
(Adapted)

When marching to Chattanooga the corps had reached a little wooded valley between the mountains. The colonel, with others, rode ahead, and, striking into a bypath, suddenly came upon a secluded little cabin surrounded by a patch of cultivated ground.

At the door an old woman, eighty years of age, was supporting herself on a crutch. As they rode up she asked if they were "Yankees," and upon their replying that they were, she said: "Have you got the Stars and Stripes with you? My father fought the Tories in the Revolution, and my old eyes ache for a sight of the true flag before I die."

To gratify her the colonel sent to have the colors brought that way. When they were unfurled and planted before her door, she passed her trembling hands over them and held them close to her eyes that she might view the stars once more. When the band gave her "Yankee Doodle," and the "`Star-Spangled Banner," she sobbed like a child, as did her daughter, a woman of fifty, while her three little grandchildren gazed in wonder.

They were Eastern people, who had gone to New Orleans to try to improve their condition. Not being successful, they had moved from place to place to better themselves, until finally they had settled on this spot, the husband having taken several acres of land here for a debt.

Then the war burst upon them. The man fled to the mountains to avoid the conscription, and they knew not whether he was alive or dead. They had managed to support life, but were so retired that they saw very few people.

Leaving them food and supplies, the colonel and the corps passed on.

Monday, May 28, 2018

How to engage a person with Alzheimer's disease

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Activities are a cornerstone to dementia health. See some great ideas on creating positive experiences for people with Alzheimer's. 





Saturday, May 26, 2018

Growing Connections: Gardening with Seniors




Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire


Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]


Aging Care
By June Fletcher,

To grow a more meaningful and healthy connection with an elderly loved one, put on some rubber clogs and head out together to the garden.
At any age, gardening is one of the best activities we can do outdoors, several experts told AgingCare.com. It stimulates all of the senses; awakens our connection with nature and with each other; and rewards us with fresh flowers and juicy tomatoes. "It's restorative, even if you have dementia," says Dee McGuire, a horticultural therapist at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Baltimore.
Gardening is also an excellent way for aging bodies to get a moderate-intensity aerobic workout, shed calories and stay flexible, according to a Kansas State University study. That's one reason why gardening remains popular with Americans well into their golden years. Indeed, about three-quarters of households age 55 or older participated in some form of lawn and garden activity in 2010, according to the National Gardening Association (NGA).
Still, there's no question that bending, lifting, kneeling, squatting, weeding and pruning—not to mention dealing with sun, heat and bugs-- all become more challenging as we grow older.
But there are ways to cope. Bruce Butterfield, the NGA's research director, says his mother was able to garden until her death at age 96 by growing flowers in about 70 big pots connected to an automatic irrigation system. "She placed them around the patio so she could get to them easily using her walker," he says.
Protection against pests and the elements is important, too, both for caregivers and seniors. New York dermatologist Arielle Kauvar says gardeners should slather on sunscreen and insect repellents before putting on clothes, so no area is overlooked. "And don't forget to protect your lips," Dr. Kauvar says, suggesting a lip balm with an SPF of at least 30.
Here are more tips for aging gardeners from these and other experts:
Rethink the Landscape
-- Reassess the yard with an eye to lowering maintenance. Wherever possible, remove lawn and replace it with ground covers, mulched beds, and paved areas or paths.
-- Add benches or chairs under shady trees.
-- Create raised beds to improve drainage and make harvesting easier. Lightweight plastic landscape timbers can be stacked to form raised beds at waist or wheelchair height, if necessary. Make the beds narrow, so anyone can reach into the center without straining.
-- Make vertical gardens by growing vining plants upward using trellises, tomato cages, bamboo stakes, fences, walls or arbors as supports. It will cut down on bending and make harvesting easier.
-- Change steps to wide, curving, gently sloping paths. Use pavers or fine gravel to line paths rather than wood chips or river rocks. Paths should be at least four feet wide to allow walker and wheelchair access, and wider at the end so wheelchairs can turn around.
-- Build high fences to keep out deer and other pests. Add latches and locks to gates if the gardener has memory problems and is prone to wandering.
-- Install an irrigation system to cut down on watering, and low-voltage lighting to improve visibility on paths and steps in the evenings.
-- Plant in containers using lightweight "soil-less" mixtures and resin or foam-walled pots to reduce weight. Put pots on casters.
-- Avoid hanging baskets, since they dry out quickly, require frequent fertilization, and can be difficult to reach.
Tend to the Gardener
-- Work in the morning and evening, when it's coolest.
-- Bring a water bottle to prevent dehydration.
-- Wear sturdy shoes, a broad-brimmed hat and gardening gloves.
-- Bend at the knees and hips to avoid injury.
-- Move from one activity to another to avoid stressing any particular muscle group.
-- Paint tool handles in neon colors or wrap them in brightly colored tape so they're easy to find if dropped.
-- Use manual shears instead of power hedge clippers to avoid accidents.
-- Hire labor (or commandeer adult children and grandchildren) to do the heaviest lifting, digging and grading.
-- If there's no room for a backyard garden, join or form a community garden.
-- If a garden-loving senior becomes bedridden, bring the outdoors inside. Plant a mini-garden in pots on the windowsill, or create a maintenance-free terrarium in an old glass or plastic container

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Red Plates for Eating with Dementia

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Alzheimers and Dementia Weekly

MEALTIME: 

If you couldn’t see your mashed potatoes,  you probably wouldn’t eat them. That's why what "The Red Plate Study" found was astonishing! Alzheimer's patients eating from red plates consumed 25 percent more food than those eating from white plates. Find out why. 




Boston University Biopsychologist Alice Cronin-Golomb and her research partners designed the “red plate study.” Their idea was to see whether seniors with advanced Alzheimer’s would eat more food from red plates than they did from white ones. The researchers in the Vision & Cognition Lab of the Center for Clinical Biopsychology, which Cronin-Golomb directs, had reason to hope that their experiment would succeed. 

Nursing home staff often complain that Alzheimer’s patients do not finish the food on their plates even when staff encourages them to do so. 40% of individuals with severe Alzheimer’s lose an unhealthy amount of weight. Previous explanations for this phenomenon included depression, inability to concentrate on more than one food at a time, and inability to eat unassisted. Cronin-Golomb and her colleagues took a different approach. They believed this behavior might be explained by the visual-cognitive deficiencies caused by Alzheimer’s. Patients with the disease cannot process visual data—like contrast and depth perception—as well as most other seniors.

So the research team tested advanced Alzheimer’s patients’ level of food intake with standard white plates and with bright-red ones. What they found was astonishing—patients eating from red plates consumed 25 percent more food than those eating from white plates.

Since these findings were published in 2004, some nursing homes have made red plates the norm. Private companies even market special red plates for seniors with visual impairment.

The CAS researchers’ approach to the problem of decreased functioning was what led to their breakthrough. Whereas many scientists look for drugs to treat degenerative cognitive diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, Cronin-Golomb and her team focus instead on finding visual aids that can improve patients’ quality of life. By assisting Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients with their visual perception, the researchers actually are able to improve the subjects’ mental functioning.

Asks Cronin-Golomb,



“If the information getting into their brain through their eyes is already degraded, how can you expect them to do much with that?”

“If we can enhance how fast they are getting information in, then they can have a better shot at remembering it. For instance, we can improve their reading speed just by enhancing what they see.”
It is generally known that memory problems are associated with Alzheimer’s disease, but many people don’t realize that vision problems can plague these patients as much as their mental challenges do.

Cronin-Golomb and her team put subjects through a battery of tests to determine their visual capabilities—visual psychophysics tests to look at contrast sensitivity, color discrimination, and depth perception; neuropsychological tests to examine object recognition, word reading, facial recognition, and pattern completion; and, finally, tests to determine whether the subjects perform better using visual aids, such as measuring cups with larger lettering. Once researchers understand each subject’s abilities, they can then assess how various visual aids improve a patient’s visual perception.

One experiment the team conducted was to test which shades of gray pills were easiest for subjects to pick out. Seniors commonly take multiple daily medications, but pill manufacturers often don’t take into account patients’ vision problems when choosing pill colors. The researchers found that with the right shade of gray, they could help patients more easily locate their medications.

The researchers also educate local caregivers for the elderly about how to use visual aids to improve patients’ functioning. Many of these caregivers are family members taking care of loved ones. Others are professional caregivers at day programs for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients, as well as architects designing living spaces for older adults.

Team member and PhD candidate Tom Laudate recalls an encounter following his talk to a local caregiver support group.

“A woman came up to me and said that just the week before, her mother had been in the kitchen trying to pour milk into a mug. The mug was white, the milk was white, and the countertop was white. She poured milk all over the place, and it wasn’t until the daughter heard me talk that it clicked in her mind and she understood her mother’s vision problem. It’s a great feeling to be able to give some information to someone that can make a difference. It’s not huge; we are not solving Alzheimer’s, but we are helping people in their daily lives.”
Cronin-Golomb’s goal is not only to train others; she is also driven by a personal connection to, and respect for, the elderly. While some people stigmatize Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and approach them with a sense of dread, she recognizes that the elderly, including some of her test subjects, are full of vitality.

“I love working with Parkinson’s patients,” she says. “It is probably from my background. My grandma lived upstairs from me. She had all these brothers, sisters, and cousins, and they’d play these really competitive games of pinochle. So they weren’t doting old people. This gave me the idea of old people as very vivacious, and only later did I come across the attitude that old people are slow and frail.”



Friday, May 18, 2018

THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF HUMOR AND LAUGHTER

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,


Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire




Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be


Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two


Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Helpguide.org

  • Humor is infectious. The sound of roaring laughter is far
     more contagious than any cough, sniffle, or sneeze.

When laughter is shared, it binds people together and

increases happiness and intimacy. In addition to the domino

effect of joy and amusement, laughter also triggers healthy

physical changes in the body. Humor and laughter

strengthen your immune system, boost your energy,

diminish pain, and protect you from the damaging effects of

stress. Best of all, this priceless medicine is fun, free, and

easy to use. 


Laughter is strong medicine for mind and body


Laughter is a powerful antidote to stress, pain, and conflict. Nothing works faster or more dependably to bring your mind and body back into balance than a good laugh. Humor lightens your burdens, inspires hopes, connects you to others, and keeps you grounded, focused, and alert.
With so much power to heal and renew, the ability to laugh easily and frequently is a tremendous resource for surmounting problems, enhancing your relationships, and supporting both physical and emotional health.

Laughter is good for your health

  • Laughter relaxes the whole body. A good, hearty laugh relieves physical tension and stress, leaving your muscles relaxed for up to 45 minutes after.
  • Laughter boosts the immune system. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells and infection-fighting antibodies, thus improving your resistance to disease.
  • Laughter triggers the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Endorphins promote an overall sense of well-being and can even temporarily relieve pain.
  • Laughter protects the heart. Laughter improves the function of blood vessels and increases blood flow, which can help protect you against a heart attack and other cardiovascular problems.




Wednesday, May 16, 2018

More fun and active ideas for engaging an Alzheimer’s patient


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

Alzheimer's Caregivers Guide

Gear activities to the patient’s ability to participate
Plan activities that the patient is interested in, such as art, cooking, walking, swimming, or gardening. Focus on enjoyment, not achievement.
If the person is lucid enough, involve them in making music, doing puzzles or crosswords, or playing memory games, card or board games. Or, the patient may passively enjoy hearing music, contact with pets, or sitting outside in the garden.

Use humor
Even when Alzheimer's patients no longer have the cognitive ability to understand your humor, they can still appreciate it. They may still smile or laugh and sharing that laughter can be a relief to both you and your charge. Use the same modes of humor as you always have: teasing, nonsense, clowning. Be even more silly than usual!

Get outdoors
Go for walks in the neighborhood, go for a drive, or spend time at a park.
Walking is often therapeutic, although the pace may not be as vigorous as you might like. Develop a style of paying more attention to the beauty and novelty of your surroundings as you walk.

Maintain an active social life
To counteract isolation and loneliness, encourage family and friends to stay involved. Take the patient to family gatherings if it’s comfortable to do so. Schedule visitors, to avoid surprises and have something to look forward to. Even if the elder with dementia does not recognize those who visit, the contact is nonetheless valuable for them.

Seek out organized group activities.
Senior centers and adult day care facilities usually provide opportunities for structured activities such as exercise, sharing meals, group games and socializing. Some programs are set up specifically to meet the needs of dementia patients. This will provide social stimulation for the patient and respite for you, the caregiver.

Join in
Sometimes the caregiver will want to join the patient in family gatherings or stay in the home when visitors are present. Caregivers can start feeling isolated and lonely themselves as more and more of their time is built around the elder’s needs. If the patient feels safe with the visitors, the caregiver can use the visiting time as an opportunity for relief and respite. Adult day care has similar benefits: social stimulation for the patient and free time for the caregiver.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Communication strategies can benefit dementia patients and caregivers

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Medical News

Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia represent an exponentially growing social and health care challenge for American families - not only family members who face the progressive brain disease, but also those who love them.

Many spouses of those with dementia do more than watch as their partners deal with the disease's effects on brain functioning, memory, motor skills and emotional health. They often assume round-the-clock caregiving responsibilities as their husband or wife of many years faces progressive decline. Communication can become a particularly difficult issue.

"We found that breakdowns in communication may trigger or deepen problem behaviors in family members with dementia," says Marie Savundranayagam, assistant professor of social work at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). "These problem behaviors by those with dementia, such as agitation and aggression, have consistently been linked with caregiver stress."

Through a UWM Research Growth Initiative grant and an Alzheimer's Association New Investigator Research Grant, Savundranayagam is working to identify communication strategies used by caregivers to resolve communication breakdowns.

Partners in long-lasting relationships are the focus of her research. "There's something very special about these relationships," she says. "These caregivers are less likely to place their spouses in a nursing home. They want to keep that family member at home as long as possible." New strategies can backfire

"Communication breakdowns can also result from caregivers' use of ineffective communication strategies that they perceive to be helpful," says Savundranayagam.

"Imagine the frustration that a wife, married to her husband for 40 years and now thrust into the role of caregiver, feels when their familiar conversational give-and-take no longer works," she continues. "When the wife tries to communicate differently, that strategy may work - or it may create even more problems.

"For example, the wife may think that she can communicate better with her loved one by talking slower. But that's actually the opposite of what should be done. A person with dementia will actually forget what was said in the first part of the sentence before the caregiver finishes talking."Insights from everyday interactions

Savundranayagam and co-investigator J.B. Orange, associate professor and director of the School of Communication Sciences & Disorders at the University of Western Ontario, are now analyzing everyday activities and communication patterns of persons affected by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

Caregiver/care receiver couples completed questionnaires and were then video-recorded as they interacted in their homes − at the dinner table, for example. Communication Sciences and Disorders students from UWM's College of Health Sciences, coached by Orange, are transcribing and coding these videos to help pinpoint the types of communication strategies the caregiver is using to resolve misunderstandings.

The next step, says Savundranayagam, is assessing the effectiveness of caregiver carstrategies. "Do their approaches exacerbate a communication problem or resolve it?" Savundranayagam's work also will investigate the role of effective and ineffective communication strategies in predicting episodes of problem behaviors and caregiver stress.

The goal is to lay the foundation and justification for designing empirically derived communication interventions for family caregivers that target both problems.

"Sometimes a caregiver can deal with problem behaviors and it's not that distressing for them," says Savundranayagam. "But other times, the caregiver's appraisal is incorrect, and a strategy that they think is good really isn't. When we see that, we know that an intervention is necessary for a specific group of caregivers.

"That's really where this project is going − to target the people who will really benefit from a communication intervention," says Savundranayagam.

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

How to Create a Care Plan for a Dementia Patient


Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals,

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

ehow

A care plan for a patient with dementia, no matter where he is living, ensures the highest quality of life for him despite this diagnosis. Since each person with dementia displays different behaviors, has specific interests and different strengths, the care plan is person centered. His dementia progresses over time. Because of this, it is more difficult to assess the dementia patient's needs and preferences as time goes on. Learn all you can while the dementia person is able to communicate. The outcome of the care plan makes the dementia patient's life as happy and satisfying as possible.

Difficulty: ModerateInstructions

Step 1Get an accurate history about the patient with dementia. This includes current medications, strengths, weaknesses, current and past interests, former jobs, and a thorough family history.

Step 2Observe the dementia patient. Make note of how she reacts to her environment, especially triggers for unwanted behavior.

Step 3Meet with all team leaders who are responsible for every aspect of the dementia patient's care. The teams include nursing, social work, therapy, activities, family members and the dementia patient, unless the meeting will upset him.

Step 4Together write a care plan that includes the best ways to care for this person. Include specific goals for each team and ways to accomplish these goals. Assign team members to each goal. Make sure to get everyone's input.

Step 5Share...read all of How to Create a Care Plan for a Dementia Patient

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Simple Dementia Activities

Activities that ANYONE can do with a RESIDENT with or without dementia



Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information


Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter


There activities can be done with dementia residents and others looking for some thing to do
I have given this list to CNAs and other non activity personal
*All residents should be toileted on a regular basis
*Beverage Distribution-be aware of consistency 
What are your favorite drinks,for winter, for summer, at night,before going to bed etc.-give choices such as do you like apple juice or ginger ale
*Snack Distribution-be aware of diets
Remember RESIDENTS MAY NOT REMEMBER WHAT YOU SAID OR DID, BUT THEY WILL REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL!!
*Hand Massages-cutting,filing, and polishing nails-have a conversation with the resident while doing this
*Appropriate TV WATCHING Anytime Animal Planet or Game Show Network
M-F Rosary, Price is Right 
Satirday evening Lawrence Welk -Sunday am Mass 
there are plenty of good appropriate movies, Lawrence Welk tapes and other Sing alongs. Join the residents in singing-MANY OF YOU are very TALENTED- *If residents are supposed to be watching TV, make sure they are facing the TV
**Before meals or any time you have a few minutes-Look at a magazine or newspaper with a resident
-Do simple word searches or crossword puzzles with the residents
-Ask trivia questions
-Do abcs of most any subject-Name all the flowers you know that start with a, then b etc.
-Play simple card games-Pass out 1 card to everyone- then before you give a second card to a resident ask if that card will be higher or lower than the one they have. Cheer for them if they are right. If they are wrong say great try. Have others give their opinions as to whether the next card of someone else will be lower or higher
-Have residents fold,sign and give cards to others. Read the card to the residents. Talk about times when you get or give cards 
THANK YOU
email
alzheimersideas@gmail.com for more ideas or if you have questions

Friday, May 4, 2018

How to Talk to Someone With Dementia: New Insights

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Here is information on being the best
caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two

People with dementia remember more than it may appear, says a small but interesting new study from the UK's University of Dundee. All knowledge isn't lost forever, as it may appear when the person is asked something and blanks on a correct response. That knowledge may be retrieved if the person is asked questions in the right way. The researchers found that when subjects were asked the meaning of words, they often couldn't say. But when the same information was asked in different ways, with more context, they often did remember.

Some related tips on how to talk to someone with dementia to boost their understanding:

Be as clear and specific as possible.
Instead of: "Do you remember Mary?"

Try: "Here's Mary, your cousin. She used to live next-door to you in Chicago."

Instead of: "What do you want for lunch?"

Try: "Do you want to eat a turkey sandwich?"

Use short sentences. Give one instruction at a time.


Sandwich game

Activities directors and other healthcare professionals here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professionals, 

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care professionals to get an easyceu or two


If you were a sandwich, what kind would you be? Find out! Take this fun personality test to see which kind of sandwich you are. See with the sandwich test.
This is one of the quizzes that has absolutely no meaning. Once 
 Age
 Under 18 Years Old

  18 to 24 Years Old

  25 to 30 Years Old

  31 to 40 Years Old

  41 to 50 Years Old

  51 to 60 Years Old

  Over 60 Years Old

2. What is your gender?
  Male

  Female

3. What kind of bread do you like for your sandwich?
  Multigrain

  Rye

  Sourdough

  A roll of any kind

  White

  Wheat

4. What goes best with a sandwich?
  Corn chips

  Pickles

  Fries

  Fruit

  Potato chips

  Soup

5. How do you cut your sandwich?
  You don't cut it, you eat it whole

  You cut it in half and cut off the crusts

  Into four little sandwiches

  You don't cut it, it's on a roll or bun

  In half, straight up and down

  In half, on the diagonal

6. Which of these sandwiches are you likely to choose?
  Cuban pork loin sandwich

  Sloppy joe

  BLT sandwich

  Pesto chicken with avocado and focaccia

  Ice cream sandwich

  Breakfast sandwich

7. The word that best describes your lunch is:
  Comforting - it's the time you eat your favorite foods

  Inventive - you don't like to eat the same thing twice in a week

  Impressive - you eat as much as you do at dinner

  Ordinary - you're likely to eat the same thing every day

  Fun - you're up for anything

  Relaxing - it's your break during the day

8. What do you drink with your sandwich?
  Soda

  Juice

  Beer

  Water

  Chocolate milk

  Milk

9. What sort of dessert are you likely to have?
  Apple pie - sweet and decadent

  Peach cobbler - downhome goodness

  Banana split - mixin' it all!

  Tiramisu - sophisticated

  Chocolate chip cookies - childish

  Cheesecake - classic

10. Where is your sandwich served?
  Fast food joint - quick and easy

  Deli - with a variety of fine foods

  Bar - gotta love the company and the game

  Upscale restaurant - expect to leave a nice tip

  Home - simple and delicious

  Leftovers - you take what's given to you

11. What sort of extras go on top of your sandwich?
  Chips - you like the crunch

  Mayo - pure mayo, not the fake stuff

  Tomato - you've matured to this

  Lettuce - necessary for the color scheme

  Chocolate - everyone's dream come true

  Ketchup - thick and flavorful

12. Besides sandwiches, which of these foods sounds most appetizing to you?
  Pizza

  Sushi

  Chicken wings

  Beef

  Donuts

  Nachos

13. It's Friday night, and you're at a party. You are probably:
  Calm, just talking to friends and having a good time

  Irresistible, the one everyone flocks to

  Full of alcohol, loud and flamboyant

  Understated and reserved, but worth getting to know

  A ball of energy, bouncing around from person to person

  Sweetness and light, trying to make everyone smile

 What Kind of Sandwich Are You?
Ham
0%
Club Sandwich
0%
Turkey Sandwich
0%
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich
0%
Grilled Cheese Sandwich

Each answer is rated 1-6
The first answer being one point. The last answer on each question is worth six points.The answers in between are worth 2-5 depending on the order they are in the answer section

Add up all your points
Ham 13-26 points
club   27-40
turkey 41-54
PB&J  55-68
grilled cheese more than 68
If you liked this quiz 


Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Special offer just for you

Activities directors, caregivers, and healthcare professionals,here is some great information

Here is a great dementia resource for caregivers and healthcare professinals,

Your residents will love the Amazon Kindle Fire

Here is information on being the best caregiver you can be

Here is a way for nurses administrators, social workers and other health care  professionals to get an easyceu or two

Follow alzheimersideas on twitter

The Dementia Caregiver's Little Book of Hope [Kindle Edition]

Special Offer on Activity Director Today E-Magazine for those in my network!

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