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Sunday, April 26, 2009

Celebrate Lei Day with those who have dementia (part 3)

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers

The next step in making leis is to place the paper strips lenghtwise through the needle in an accordian like fashion. A less able resident can help push the paper down to the knot, Keep adding strips of paper in the same way until the yarn is almost all covered. Knot the yarn at the needle end. Cut the yarn between the knot just made and the needle. Tie the two ends of the almost completed lei together

It should now be ready to use. My suggestion is to make some leis and buy the rest. As I said before, I like to give each resident a lei. Thus if you do that, you will need quite a few

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

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Saturday, April 25, 2009

Celebrating Lei Day with those who have dementia (part 2)

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers

There is something for folks with almost every level of dementia, to do.

Tearing strips of paper is a good part of the lei making process for lower functioning group members. If group members have trouble making the strips then you or a higher functioning resident can tear the strips as the less able resident holds the paper.

Use yarn as the holder for the paper strips. Use a plastic craft needle. Thread the yarn into the needle. A double strand of yarn is best. The double stranded yarn should be at least 30 inches long Make sure to make a knot at the end of the yarn.

Next start putting the paper through the needle in an…..

Come back tomorrow to find out this and more

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Volunteers are important, honor them

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers celebrate National Volunteer Week
Ezine

National Volunteer Week runs from April 19 through April 25 this year. This week is about recognizing those individuals who have engaged in their community. It's about showing the nation that we meet our challenges not as isolated individuals but as members of a true community with all of us working together. It is about all the wonderful things the volunteers do.

Many nursing home volunteers have assisted the staff in enriching the lives of the residents in oh so many ways. Some of the volunteers serve coffee and doughnuts. Some lead religious services. Some provide assistance at bingo or another activity. Some play musical instruments or lead a sing a long. Others visit residents with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias. They help to keep the minds of these folks active. Some just take time to put a smile on the faces of the residents. Of course, our volunteers help in many other ways but they are just too numerous to mention.

The theme of National Volunteer Week this year is "Celebrating People in Action". We are extremely fortunate to have these individuals, young and old, take such an interest in the happiness of the residents.

National Volunteer Week began in 1974 when President Richard Nixon signed an executive order establishing a week in April as an annual celebration of volunteering. Since then, every U.S. President has signed a proclamation promoting National Volunteer Week. Also, governors, mayors, and other elected officials make public statements and sign proclamations in support of National Volunteer Week.

In 2003, President Bush created the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation to explore ways to acknowledge the worthwhile contributions volunteers are making in our Nation. The Council brings.........read the whole article

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here

Sunday, April 19, 2009

National Volunteer Week


Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers, what are you doing for your volunteers?

This week is the perfect opportunity to honor your volunteers.

They do so much for you.

We will be having a breakfast for our volunteers.

We now give the Presidents Volunteer Service Award to our volunteers

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here
For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here
For more interesting dementia articles and activities, click here

Friday, April 17, 2009

Patriot’s Day activities for those with dementia

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers
I love holidays and here we have another opportunity to celebrate one.

I especially love patriotic holidays because most people with dementia identify strongly with patriotism.

Even though Patriot’s Day is a lesser known holiday, there is no reason why you can not celebrate in grand or not so grand fashion.

As with all patriotic holidays,discuss symbols of patriotism.

I like to have a flag available.
Then I like to ask questions about the flag.
Here are some possible questions
*What color is the flag or are on the flag?
Side question
What other things are:
Red
White and/or
Blue ?
*What shape is the flag?
Side question:
What other things are that shape?
Again if these questions are too hard then………Come back tomorrow for the answer and for more ideas

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

About The Fisher Center For Alzheimer's Research Foundation

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers,this blog has been added to the Community Links at the Fisher Center For Alzheimer's Research Foundation.
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The Fisher Center For Alzheimer's Research Foundation is team of internationally renowned scientists, under the direction of Nobel laureate Dr. Paul Greengard, has been at the forefront of seminal research that has provided the conceptual framework for modern day investigations into Alzheimer’s disease. The Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research at The Rockefeller University headquartered in New York City collaborates with the other leading research institutions around the world in the global pursuit for the cause, care and cure of Alzheimer’s disease.

Of every dollar raised, 94 cents goes directly to research programs

The mission is dedicated to attacking the scourge of Alzheimer's with a 3-pronged assault focused on the cause, care, and cure for Alzheimer's disease as well as supporting the public with educational programs.

To read more about the Fisher Center For Alzheimer's Research Foundation, click here

To donate, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Saturday, April 11, 2009

Limericks that make you smile(part 2)

Activities directors, other healthcareprofessionals and caregivers,here is part 2
alzact

We were discussing limericks yesterday. I said that this is a great mind stimulating, fun activity for those with dementia.

Here is one:
A very smart dog I once knew
Liked to ride on a bike to the zoo
And from what I could tell
He rode it quite well
Though his hand signals truly were few.

You can use this limerick. Just eliminate the...read the whole post

For dementia information, click here

For more Alzheimer's and dementia activities, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Limericks that make you smile

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers making those with Alzheimer's disease, a related dementia, and other long term care residents laugh is exellent therapy because laughter is the best medicine.

Helping them to create something enjoyable is also extremely satisfying to them.Here is a great idea from the Alzheimer's activities expert

What are limericks and how can people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias write them?

A limerick is meant to be funny. Therefore they are sure to bring a smile to the faces of the folks with or without dementia in your audience.

Limeriks are....read the whole post

For dementia information, click here

For more Alzheimer's and dementia activities, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Harms honored during Long Term Care Administrator's week

Activities directrs, other healthcare professionals, and caregivers, is it not nice when an administrator of a long term care facility with dementia residents, can make their world better.
Fort Scott Tribune
Nevada, Mo. -- David Harms, Administrator for the Barone Alzheimer's Care Center, has been involved in the health care field since 1989 and in the long-term care field since 1997.
He was born in Columbus, Ga, where his father was stationed in the U.S. Army. He doesn't hesitate to claim Vernon County as his home, though. "My family moved to Nevada, Mo., in 1969."..........
His attitude toward senior residents is his best asset. "I believe that providing quality care to our nation's senior citizens and disabled is one of the most important services we provide as a society," Harms explained.

His "always available" policy isn't such an easy task when the scope of his administrative duties is explored.

A single day might include a business meeting at Barone's parent facility, Nevada Regional Medical Center; several calls to various entities to facilitate functional needs of the building itself; staff meetings to coordinate services to the residents; or giving a luncheon speech to help educate the community to the ever-growing Alzheimer's population's needs.

Unlike some long-term care facility administrators who have offices far removed from the people they serve, Harms is very...................read the rest of the article

For dementia information, click here

For Alzheimer's and dementia activities, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Thursday, April 2, 2009

Celebrating April

Activities directors, other healthcare professionals and caregivers go here

for some great activity ideas for April.

For dementia information, click here

For Alzheimer's and dementia activities, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

New therapy is found for dementia patients

Activities directors, other healthcare professinals and caregivers, here is an article which showed what we have already seen to be true
Irish Times
LORNA SIGGINS, Western Correspondent
REMINISCENCE THERAPY can have a significant effect on patients suffering from dementia, according to research due to be presented at an international nursing conference in Galway next week.


Patients engaged in the therapy tend to be far less agitated, and the focus on psycho-social needs benefits both patients and staff, the research at National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG) School of Nursing and Midwifery has found.

Reminiscence therapy involves discussing past activities, events and experiences in an individual or group setting, often using aids such as videos, pictures, books and archival material.

NUIG is currently running a project funded by the Health Research Board known as DARES (Dementia Education Programme incorporating Reminiscence Therapy for Staff), which involves training staff to use the approach.

Prof Kathy Murphy, head of NUIG’s School of Nursing and Midwifery, said the incidence of dementia in long-stay care was estimated at 20-30 per cent.

“However, in some instances, it can be up to 50 per cent in residential care, and staff tend to be general nurses who feel that the dementia condition would be more appropriately treated by psychiatric nurses.

“This programme meets the staff needs, and the needs of patients, by helping them to understand dementia better,” she explained.

“There is much more focus now on the psycho-social needs in residential care, and this therapy helps people with this condition to know their history and their past.”

NUIG’s second International Nursing and Midwifery conference will also hear about separate research done at the college on managing chronic illness in a primary care setting.

About 3 per cent of the population suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary rehabilitation can alleviate the condition.

NUIG is currently training nurses to....read the whole article

For more dementia information, click here

For Alzheimer's and dementia activities, click here

For information on being the best caregiver you can be, click here

For a great resource for those with dementia, caregivers and healthcare professinals, click here